24

I have two DB tables in a one-to-many relationship. The data looks like this:

select * from student, application

Resultset:

+-----------+---------------+---------------------+
| StudentID | ApplicationID | ApplicationDateTime |
+-----------+---------------+---------------------+
| 1         | 20001         | 12 April 2011       |
| 1         | 20002         | 15 May 2011         |
| 2         | 20003         | 02 Feb 2011         |
| 2         | 20004         | 13 March 2011       |
| 2         | 20005         | 05 June 2011        |
+-----------+---------------+---------------------+

I want to delete all applications except for the most recent one. In other words, each student must only have one application linked to it. Using the above example, the data should look like this:

+-----------+---------------+---------------------+
| StudentID | ApplicationID | ApplicationDateTime |
+-----------+---------------+---------------------+
| 1         | 20002         | 15 May 2011         |
| 2         | 20005         | 05 June 2011        |
+-----------+---------------+---------------------+

How would I go about constructing my DELETE statement to filter out the correct records?

5
  • 1
    Is it necessary that these students have more than one application at any time? If not, you could just have a one-to-one relationship. Commented Aug 30, 2011 at 5:44
  • 1
    @mu Since this is tagged [plsql], I assume it's Oracle. Commented Aug 30, 2011 at 6:02
  • As an aside, I can't alter the DB schema, or change relationships between tables etc.
    – sim
    Commented Aug 30, 2011 at 6:28
  • What do your tables look like (ie: DESC student; DESC application)? Commented Aug 30, 2011 at 6:28
  • Your select statement seems wrong. You are not joining the two tables.
    – user330315
    Commented Aug 30, 2011 at 8:46

3 Answers 3

28
DELETE FROM student
WHERE ApplicationDateTime <> (SELECT max(ApplicationDateTime) 
                              FROM student s2
                              WHERE s2.StudentID  = student.StudentID)

Given the long discussion in the comments, please note the following:

The above statement will work on any database that properly implements statement level read consistency regardless of any changes to the table while the statement is running.

Databases where I definitely know that this works correctly even with concurrent modifications to the table: Oracle (the one which this question is about), Postgres, SAP HANA, Firebird (and most probably MySQL using InnoDB). Because they all guarantee a consistent view of the data at the point in time when the statement started. Changing the <> to < will not change anything for them (including Oracle which this question is about)

For the above mentioned databases, the statement is not subject to the isolation level because phantom reads or non-repeatable reads can only happen between multiple statements - not within a single statement.

For database that do not implement MVCC properly and rely on locking to manage concurrency (thus blocking concurrent write access) this might actually yield wrong results if the table is updated concurrently. For those the workaround using < is probably needed.

12
  • I'd suggest to use '<' instead of '<>' to avoid potential problems with concurrent transactions. Commented Nov 17, 2016 at 9:45
  • @No-BugsHare: the statement won't see any changes done by concurrent transactions. So changing <> to < won't make a difference
    – user330315
    Commented Nov 18, 2016 at 8:50
  • behaviour you're referring to, heavily depends on a "transaction isolation level" (which is mostly-never set to Serializable in practice - and it looks that even "RR" is not enough to make this completely safe as "phantom reads" possible under RR seem to cause potential trouble to this particular statement); hence - the '<' is safer Commented Nov 19, 2016 at 16:16
  • @No-BugsHare: no it doesn't, not with any modern DBMS. A single statement sees a consistent view of all involved tables as long as the statement runs. It will never see any concurrent modifications. A single statement can't have phantom reads or non-repeatable reads. The only thing this statement does not take care of is when new "latest" rows are inserted while it runs - but as those will be invisible to the running statement changing <> to < won't change that as well
    – user330315
    Commented Nov 19, 2016 at 20:04
  • Transaction isolation is a performance-vs-isolation compromise, and is all about locks (or MVCC-snapshot-to-be-used); as a result, they work in terms of execution plans and accessed rows, and not in terms of statements. That is, if we're not speaking about MySQL+ISAM which doesn't even have compliant transactions, leave alone transaction isolation (and which puts table-level locks on per statement basis, crazy stuff; probably it indeed doesn't matter for MySQL+ISAM, but as the OP wasn't mentioning MySQL+ISAM - I still suggest to change it to '<'). Commented Nov 21, 2016 at 9:42
8

You can use row_number() (or rank() or dense_rank(), or even just the rownum pseudocolumn) to apply an order to the records, and then use that order to decide which to discard. In this case, ordering by applicationdatetime desc gives the application with the most recent date for each student the rank of 1:

select studentid, applicationid from (
    select studentid, applicationid,
        row_number() over (partition by studentid
            order by applicationdatetime desc) as rn
    from application
)
where rn = 1;

 STUDENTID APPLICATIONID
---------- -------------
         1         20002
         2         20005

You can then delete anything with a rank higher than 1, which will preseve the records you care about:

delete from application
where (studentid, applicationid) in (
    select studentid, applicationid from (
        select studentid, applicationid,
            row_number() over (partition by studentid
                order by applicationdatetime desc) as rn
        from application
    )
    where rn > 1
);

3 rows deleted.
1

At first you can do so

DELETE FROM [student]
           or [application]
WHERE (studentid, applicationid) NOT IN (SELECT StudentID
                                               ,MAX(ApplicationID)
                                         FROM student
                                             ,application
group by StudentID);

but there is another solution to, you can create the backup table, after delete all records in your tables and after insert your data (what you want) with max values select in your tables.

0

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