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Is there a way to generate a (random) dataset that is filled with values having 6 decimals and 1 number before the decimal separator?

So for example like this:

 "A":[5.398811, 2.232098, 9.340909, 3.343434],
 "B":[6.436293,5.293756, 1.235937, 1.987384],
 "C": [3.572831, 3.826355, 3.827264, 3.257321]

I found that round(random.uniform(33.33, 66.66), 2) returns a random float number up to 2 decimal places. However, I don't want a dataframe filled "up to" 2 decimal places but a dataframe filled with only 6 decimal places. I would like to have about 1000 rows and 100 columns.

EDIT: It would also be nice to not have any 0's or 9's in any of the decimals. This because I am looking into rounding decimals. When rounding 1.999999 to 5 decimals, one wil get 2.00000 which is 2. Which then will not give a reliable rounding result. Don't know to what extend that's actually feasible.

3
  • Obviously you start by changing the 2 by 6, and setting the minimum and maximum value to get 1 digit before the decimal point (hint: numbers should not be 10 or greater). Did you try that? What is then the problem?
    – trincot
    May 26, 2022 at 17:58
  • use round(random.uniform(0, 10), 6). Alternatively you can generate random 7 digit numbers and divide by million.
    – Ach113
    May 26, 2022 at 18:01
  • The problem for both these solutions is that there is a possibility of getting values with less than 6 decimals while I do need those 6 decimals. May 26, 2022 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

1

You can use numpy.random.uniform for efficiency, then convert to dictionary:

import numpy as np
col,row = (10,20)  # (100, 1000) in your case
out = dict(enumerate(np.random.uniform(0,10,size=col*row)
                       .round(6).reshape(row,col).tolist()))

print(out)

output:

{0: [5.488135, 7.151894, 6.027634, 5.448832, 4.236548, 6.458941, 4.375872, 8.91773, 9.636628, 3.834415],
 1: [7.91725, 5.288949, 5.680446, 9.255966, 0.710361, 0.871293, 0.202184, 8.326198, 7.781568, 8.700121],
 2: [9.786183, 7.991586, 4.614794, 7.805292, 1.182744, 6.39921, 1.433533, 9.446689, 5.218483, 4.146619],
...
 19: [3.982211, 2.098437, 1.86193, 9.443724, 7.395508, 4.904588, 2.274146, 2.543565, 0.580292, 4.344166],
}

NB. note that the numbers will be UP TO 6 decimal digits (e.g., 0.123400 will be shown as 0.1234, forcing otherwise would create a non-random bias

pure python version (less efficient):

import random
out = {i: [round(random.uniform(0, 10), 6) for j in range(100)]
       for i in range(1000)}

exactly 6 digits

You can check if the rounded number has a zero on the 6th decimal place, and in this case add an arbitrary number. Here is an example, initial dataset:

np.random.seed(0) # for reproducibility
a = np.random.uniform(0, 10, size=20).round(6)

array([5.488135, 7.151894, 6.027634, 5.448832, 4.236548, 6.458941,
       4.375872, 8.91773 , 9.636628, 3.834415, 7.91725 , 5.288949,
       5.680446, 9.255966, 0.710361, 0.871293, 0.202184, 8.326198,
       7.781568, 8.700121])

With correction:

np.random.seed(0) # for reproducibility
a = np.random.uniform(0, 10, size=20).round(6)
# identify numbers ending in 0
mask = (a*1e6).astype(int)%10==0
# add a terminal 1
a[mask] += 1e-6
a

array([5.488135, 7.151894, 6.027634, 5.448832, 4.236548, 6.458941,
       4.375872, 8.917731, 9.636628, 3.834415, 7.917251, 5.288949,
       5.680446, 9.255966, 0.710361, 0.871293, 0.202184, 8.326198,
       7.781568, 8.700121])

This works by multiplying by 1e6 as integer and getting the remainder of division by 10:

(a*1e6).astype(int)%10

array([5, 4, 4, 2, 8, 1, 2, 0, 8, 5, 0, 9, 6, 6, 1, 3, 4, 8, 8, 1])

example with DataFrame

import numpy as np
col,row = (4,5)  # (100, 1000) in your case
a = np.random.uniform(0,10,size=col*row).round(6).reshape(row,col)
mask = (a*1e6+1).astype(int)%10<2
# add a terminal 1
a[mask] += 2e-6

df = pd.DataFrame(a)

print(df)

Output:

          0         1         2         3
0  5.488135  7.151894  6.027634  5.448832
1  4.236548  6.458941  4.375872  8.917732
2  9.636628  3.834415  7.917252  5.288951
3  5.680446  9.255966  0.710361  0.871293
4  0.202184  8.326198  7.781568  8.700121
13
  • Thank you for this solution already, I would not mind a non-random bias, I just need a 6 decimal filled dataframe May 26, 2022 at 18:09
  • @Iris may I ask what is the use case?
    – mozway
    May 26, 2022 at 18:15
  • Yes, I want to assess results of rounding values in a dataset on its CSV file storage. I want these results to be fully reliable. However, I realized that when rounding a 1.999 to 2 decimal places it will result in a 2.000 which is a 2. Therefore it would be nice to also not have any 9's in the numbers. May 26, 2022 at 18:19
  • I provided an update
    – mozway
    May 26, 2022 at 18:40
  • Hi yes thank you, I don't want to be difficult because I am very thankful for your solution and effort already but is it possible to also remove any 9's and 0's from the numbers, that way the measure for rounding will be fully reliable as no digits will disappear when rounding... May 26, 2022 at 18:51
0

Maybe try to generate numbers from 1,000,000 to 9,999,999 and then divide by 1,000,000. This will ensure that the numbers are always exactly 6 decimals.

Regarding the second condition, you can run a check on the number by casting to a string, something like:

if '9' in str(the_number): 
    continue
else:
    result.append(the_number)
6
  • what is 1M/1M in terms of decimal places? ;)
    – mozway
    May 26, 2022 at 18:25
  • But how would I incorporate this in code of the answer above? May 26, 2022 at 18:29
  • @mozway I completely forgot about zeroes in the first digit. Maybe add another check in the same if condition to check if number%10 == 0 or maybe len(str(number)) < 6. Thank you for the comment. May 26, 2022 at 18:43
  • 1
    converting to string is expensive, check my answer for another method ;)
    – mozway
    May 26, 2022 at 18:44
  • @IrisJacobs the other answer provided a great solution. Don't bother with my answer. May 26, 2022 at 18:44

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