89

Let's say I ran a command using a zsh

echo "mysecret" > file

I can easily print the history including the entry numbers using the command fc -l:

1  echo "mysecret" >| file

But how can I easily delete an entry from the history?

I cannot find a corresponding paragraph in man zshbuiltins.

2

7 Answers 7

112

*BSD/Darwin (macOS):

LC_ALL=C sed -i '' '/porn/d' $HISTFILE

Linux (GNU sed):

LC_ALL=C sed -i '/porn/d' $HISTFILE

This will remove all lines matching "porn" from your $HISTFILE.

With setopt HIST_IGNORE_SPACE, you can prepend the above command with a space character to prevent it from being written to $HISTFILE.

As Tim pointed out in his comment below, the prefix LC_ALL=C prevents 'illegal byte sequence' failure.

3
66

I don't know if there is some elegant method for doing this, but in similar situations I have logged out (allowing zsh to empty its buffer and write my history to file), then logged in, and finally manually edited ~/.zsh_history, deleting the "dangerous" line.

3
  • 1
    Worked for me. I did have to restart my terminal for it picked up on the changes. Aug 3, 2016 at 18:12
  • 1
    For bonus points, avoid loading the history file by setting the environment variable HISTFILE=/dev/null, or just use another shell. If zsh is the login shell, login and exec sh, then edit ~/.zhistory.
    – gnucchi
    Mar 14, 2018 at 14:12
  • It does work! remove command from ~/.zsh_history, then restart zsh.
    – Ferris
    Jun 6, 2019 at 1:23
34

If you use the HIST_IGNORE_SPACE option in zsh you can prepend commands with a space " " and they will not be remembered in the history file. If you have secret commands you commonly use you can do something along the lines of: alias hiddencommand=' hiddencommand'.

2
  • 6
    put setopt histignorespace in your ~/.zshrc
    – Tim Abell
    Mar 24, 2017 at 21:57
  • Thanks for histignorespace. Very useful ! Mar 21, 2018 at 9:00
5

I think the solution I found is easier.

In a zsh terminal (in mac os)

  1. I closed the terminal session in which I had a command I wanted to delete.
  2. Opened a new session,
  3. opened ~/.zsh_history with a text editor (I used emacs but nano or any other would do, I guess),
  4. deleted the faulty lines, closed the editor,
  5. closed the Terminal session,
  6. opened a new Terminal sessionsession,
  7. entered history and the unwanted history item was gone.

Make sure emacs hasn't backed up the previous .zsh_history instance.

(Solution based on https://til.hashrocket.com/posts/zn87awopb4-delete-a-command-from-zsh-history-)

4

This function will remove any one line you want from your Zsh history, no questions asked:

# Accepts one history line number as argument.
# Alternatively, you can do `dc -1` to remove the last line.
dc () {
  # Prevent the specified history line from being saved.
  local HISTORY_IGNORE="${(b)$(fc -ln $1 $1)}"

  # Write out the history to file, excluding lines that match `$HISTORY_IGNORE`.
  fc -W

  # Dispose of the current history and read the new history from file.
  fc -p $HISTFILE $HISTSIZE $SAVEHIST

  # TA-DA!
  print "Deleted '$HISTORY_IGNORE' from history."
}

If you want to additionally prevent all dc commands from being written to history, add the following in your ~/.zshrc file:

zshaddhistory() {
 [[ $1 != 'dc '* ]]
}

Update

I've now published a more comprehensive solution as a plugin: https://github.com/marlonrichert/zsh-hist

0
0

I found pilgix answer the easiest by far!

In a zsh terminal (in mac os)

  1. I closed the terminal session in which I had a command I wanted to delete.
  2. Opened a new session
  3. opened ~/.zsh_history with a text editor (I used emacs but nano or any other would do, I guess)
  4. deleted the faulty lines, closed the editor
  5. closed the Terminal session
  6. opened a new Terminal sessionsession
  7. entered history and the unwanted history item was gone.

Make sure emacs hasn't backed up the previous .zsh_history instance.

(Solution based on [https://til.hashrocket.com/posts/zn87awopb4-delete-a-command-from-zsh-history-])

New contributor
doug is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
-5

In BASH [Not ZSH]:

1- in bash terminal type

hsitory # This will list all commands in history .bash_history file with line numbers

ex:

  ...
  987  cd
  988  ssh x@127.0.0.1
  990  exit
  991  cd

2- pick the CMD line number you want to delete

history -d 988

Note: if you want to delete for example last 3 CMDs, just pick the third line number from bottom ex: 988 and repeat the CMD history -d 988 3 times in sequence.

Source

2
  • 3
    history -d does not work in ZSH because it's only alias for fc -l 1 and it ends with fc: event not found: -d error.
    – Wirone
    Mar 27, 2020 at 14:23
  • yes, and I wrote in bash! Just in case some one needed it for bash not zsh
    – KhogaEslam
    Mar 28, 2020 at 11:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.