167

I have the line in vb code:

#if Not Debug

which I must convert, and I don't see it in c#?

Is there something equivalent to it, or is there some workaround?

6 Answers 6

337

You would need to use:

#if !DEBUG
    // Your code here
#endif

Or, if your symbol is actually Debug

#if !Debug
    // Your code here
#endif

From the documentation, you can effectively treat DEBUG as a boolean. So you can do complex tests like:

#if !DEBUG || (DEBUG && SOMETHING)
18

Just so you are familiar with what is going on here, #if is a pre-processing expression, and DEBUG is a conditional compilation symbol. Here's an MSDN article for a more in-depth explanation.

By default, when in Debug configuration, Visual Studio will check the Define DEBUG constant option under the project's Build properties. This goes for both C# and VB.NET. If you want to get crazy you can define new build configurations and define your own Conditional compilation symbols. The typical example when you see this though is:

#if DEBUG
    //Write to the console
#else
    //write to a file
#endif
17

Just in case it helps someone else out, here is my answer.

This would not work right:

#if !DEBUG
     // My stuff here
#endif

But this did work:

#if (DEBUG == false)
     // My stuff here
#endif
1
  • 10
    Might have been right at the day this was posted, but at least for VS 2015 !DEBUG does work as expected
    – Ole Albers
    Commented Jun 20, 2016 at 8:01
5

I think something like will work

 #if (DEBUG)
//Something
#else
//Something
#endif
2
  • 7
    Just noting the parenthesis are not required for this conditional #if statements. It can be written #if DEBUG
    – atconway
    Commented Mar 15, 2013 at 15:46
  • Absolutely not what was asked. Commented Jun 30, 2023 at 10:43
0

I ended on this question when I googled, just want to add that an alternative could be

#if RELEASE
-4
     bool isDebugMode = false;
#if DEBUG
     isDebugMode = true;
#endif
    if (isDebugMode == false)
    {
       enter code here
    }
    else
    {
       enter code here
    }
4
  • 6
    This is a bad answer since it uses run-time logic to handle what could be done at compile time.
    – antiduh
    Commented Mar 18, 2016 at 18:06
  • Design time T4 templating and the like will need this kind of thing from time to time.
    – StingyJack
    Commented Jan 24, 2017 at 1:05
  • the advantage of using run time over compile time is that it is infinitely easier to debug, since you don't have to recompile. It also reduces the number of versions of code you could compile, which again is easier to support. if anything, using run time logic over compile time is an advantage, though in this case I would still prefer the more concise handling
    – J Scott
    Commented Feb 16, 2022 at 16:45
  • Absolutely not what was asked. Commented Jun 30, 2023 at 10:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.