36

Possible Duplicate:
#ifdef inside #define

How do I use the character "#" successfully inside a Macro? It screams when I do something like that:

#define DO(WHAT)        \
#ifdef DEBUG        \                           
  MyObj->WHAT()         \       
#endif              \

marked as duplicate by Suma, user424459, Bo Persson, Eitan T, user612429 Jul 16 '12 at 0:13

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49

You can't do that. You have to do something like this:

#ifdef DEBUG
#define DO(WHAT) MyObj->WHAT()
#else
#define DO(WHAT) do { } while(0)
#endif

The do { } while(0) avoids empty statements. See this question, for example.

  • So with an empty statement I could run into trouble on some c++ compilers? My app is cross platform, OSX, Windows and Ubuntu. Is this the safe thing to do? – JasonGenX Aug 30 '11 at 16:35
  • 1
    +1: The do {} while(0) construct is something I forgot to mention in my answer. – Oliver Charlesworth Aug 30 '11 at 16:40
  • @Ron: This actually lets you write : if(x) DO(m); else DO(n);. while @Oli's solution will give compilation error. – Nawaz Aug 30 '11 at 16:40
  • 1
    I see. Much thanks. – JasonGenX Aug 30 '11 at 16:42
  • 2
    This is one reason to use inline functions rather than macros! – Bo Persson Aug 30 '11 at 16:43
10

It screams because you can't do that.

I suggest the following as an alternative:

#ifdef DEBUG
#define DO(WHAT) MyObj->WHAT()
#else
#define DO(WHAT)
#endif
4

It seems that what you want to do can be achieved like this, without running into any problems:

#ifdef DEBUG
#    define DO(WHAT) MyObj->WHAT()
#else
#    define DO(WHAT) while(false)
#endif

Btw, better use the NDEBUG macro, unless you have a more specific reason not to. NDEBUG is more widely used as a macro that means no-debugging. For example the standard assert macro can be disabled by defining NDEBUG. Your code would become:

#ifndef NDEBUG
#    define DO(WHAT) MyObj->WHAT()
#else
#    define DO(WHAT) while(false)
#endif
  • 1
    You should emphasize that since NDEBUG means no-debugging, the #ifdef becomes #ifndef. – ilpelle Jan 19 '18 at 16:05
2

You can do the same thing like this:

#ifdef DEBUG
#define DO(WHAT) MyObj->WHAT()
#else
#define DO(WHAT)
#endif
  • See other for correct way to avoid empty statements... – antlersoft Aug 30 '11 at 16:31
2

How about:

#ifdef DEBUG
#define DO(WHAT) MyObj->WHAT()
#else
#define DO(WHAT)
#endif

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