2

I'm trying to split a sentence (char *) to an array of words (char **). The problem is that my function that does just that sometimes doesn't return a valid char **.

char **get_words(char *buffer, char delimiter)
{
    char **words = malloc(sizeof(char *) * 4096);
    for (int i = 0; i < 4096; i++)
        words[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * 4096);
    int word_count = 0;
    int l = 0;
    for (int i = 0; buffer[i] != '\0' && buffer[i]  != '\n'; i++, l++) {
        if (buffer[i] == delimiter) {
            words[word_count][l] = '\0';
            word_count++;
            l = -1;
        }
        else
            words[word_count][l] = buffer[i];
    }
    words[word_count][l] = '\0';
    return (words);
}

I first use it like this:

char *buffer = malloc(sizeof(char) * 50);
buffer = "/login test\n";
char **words = get_words(buffer, ' ');
printf("Words[0] = %s", words[0]);

And it works fine.

However when I do it the same way with this:

char **reply = get_words("502 Command doesn't exist.\n", ' ')

I can't even print reply[0][0] (see below) without having a segmentation fault. Moreover, I tried to debug this using valgrind but when I use it the program doesn't crash and everything works so I can't find what's wrong.

printf("Reply[0][0] = %d\n", reply[0][0]);

printf("Reply[0][0] = %c\n", reply[0][0]);

EDIT: Here is a reproductible example.

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <assert.h>

char **get_words(char *buffer, char delimiter)
{
    printf("buffer = %s\n", buffer);
    char **words = malloc(sizeof(char *) * 100);
    if (words == NULL) {
        printf("Malloc Error\n");
        exit(84);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        words[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * 100);
        if (words[i] == NULL) {
            printf("Malloc Error\n");
            exit(84);
        }
    }
    int word_count = 0;
    int l = 0;
    for (int i = 0; buffer[i] != '\0' && buffer[i]  != '\n'; i++, l++) {
        if (buffer[i] == delimiter) {
            words[word_count][l] = '\0';
            word_count++;
            l = -1;
        }
        else
            words[word_count][l] = buffer[i];
    }
    words[word_count][l] = '\0';
    return (words);
}

int main()
{
    char *buffer = malloc(sizeof(char) * 100);
    buffer = "hello world !\n";
    char **words = get_words(buffer, ' ');
    printf("words[0]= %s\n", words[0]);
    free (buffer);
    char **reply = get_words("Second call\n", ' ');
    printf("reply[0] = %s\n", reply[0]);
}
10
  • 2
    How are you trying to print reply[0][0]? Please post a proper minimal reproducible example Jun 2 at 15:30
  • 2
    Maybe check the return value from the calls to malloc, to see if any failed? Jun 2 at 15:40
  • 1
    It runs just fine on my machine. Maybe share some more code if you can and double-check if the get_words function really is the way you posted it and you use it exactly the way you posted it?
    – PhilMasteG
    Jun 2 at 15:49
  • 4
    Wow, 16 MB of storage for the breakdown of one sentence. That seems a bit overkill, doesn't it? Jun 2 at 15:53
  • 1
    Prepare a bona fide minimal reproducible example. That is, the simplest possible complete program that demonstrates the issue for you. Chances are good that the exercise will help you discover the problem for yourself, but if not then we should be able to recognize it within the MRE. It seems unlikely that the code fragments presented so far capture the true problem. Jun 2 at 16:01

1 Answer 1

5

If you need help in learning programming, you can try a static analyzer. This is a program that performs code reviews and finds suspicious code fragments. Static analyzers can't replace code reviews performed by a teammate. However, analyzers complement code reviews and help find many errors at earliest stages.

Let's run the online version of the PVS-Studio analyzer for the code sample attached to the question. The first interesting and important warning is the following warning: V1031 The malloc function is not declared. Passing data to or from this function can be affected.

Without declaring the malloc function, the program runs in a strange way. According to the C language, if a function is not declared, it returns int. But actually, it's a pointer. You can find out why this is dangerous here. Let's fix this problem by adding #include <stdlib.h>.

Now the analyzer issues another warning — we get a more serious issue: 43:1: note: V773 The 'buffer' pointer was assigned values twice without releasing the memory. A memory leak is possible.

The issue is in the following code fragment:

char *buffer = malloc(sizeof(char) * 100);
buffer = "hello world !\n";
....
free (buffer);

The pointer value is overwritten. To copy a string to the buffer, a programmer should use special functions, for example strcpy. Let's fix this.

Here's the fixed code.

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char **get_words(char *buffer, char delimiter)
{
    printf("buffer = %s\n", buffer);
    char **words = malloc(sizeof(char *) * 100);
    if (words == NULL) {
        printf("Malloc Error\n");
        exit(84);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        words[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * 100);
        if (words[i] == NULL) {
            printf("Malloc Error\n");
            exit(84);
        }
    }
    int word_count = 0;
    int l = 0;
    for (int i = 0; buffer[i] != '\0' && buffer[i]  != '\n'; i++, l++) {
        if (buffer[i] == delimiter) {
            words[word_count][l] = '\0';
            word_count++;
            l = -1;
        }
        else
            words[word_count][l] = buffer[i];
    }
    words[word_count][l] = '\0';
    return (words);
}

int main()
{
    char *buffer = malloc(sizeof(char) * 100);
    if (buffer == NULL)
        exit(84);
    strcpy(buffer, "hello world !\n");
    char **words = get_words(buffer, ' ');
    printf("words[0]= %s\n", words[0]);
    free (buffer);
    char **reply = get_words("Second call\n", ' ');
    printf("reply[0] = %s\n", reply[0]);
}

I can't say that this code is perfect and secure, but it runs. So, using static analyzers to find errors, you can improve your learning process.

1
  • Thanks a lot, haven't heard about static analyzers before but I will use them often now !
    – BLSPR
    Jun 3 at 14:22

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