396

In my table view I have to scroll to the top. But I cannot guarantee that the first object is going to be section 0, row 0. May be that my table view will start from section number 5.

So I get an exception, when I call:

[mainTableView scrollToRowAtIndexPath:[NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:0 inSection:0] atScrollPosition:UITableViewScrollPositionTop animated:NO];

Is there another way to scroll to the top of table view?

34 Answers 34

859
0

UITableView is a subclass of UIScrollView, so you can also use:

[mainTableView scrollRectToVisible:CGRectMake(0, 0, 1, 1) animated:YES];

Or

[mainTableView setContentOffset:CGPointZero animated:YES];

And in Swift:

mainTableView.setContentOffset(CGPointZero, animated:true)

And in Swift 3 & above:

mainTableView.setContentOffset(.zero, animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    I first tried this with CGRectZero, which is equivalent to CGRectMake(0, 0, 0, 0). This does not work, but oddly the above does. I guess it needs a positive width and height. Thank you. – Keller Jan 14 '13 at 17:57
  • 5
    Note, you will want animated:NO if you run this in scrollToRowAtIndexPath: so as to make the table start in the correct position. Hope it helps! – Fattie Jan 27 '14 at 14:25
  • 3
    @hasan83 CGRectMake(0, 0, 0, 0) or CGRectZero isn't a visible rect. I would also say that [mainTableView setContentOffset:CGPointZero animated:YES]; is the prettier expression. – catlan Apr 27 '15 at 5:01
  • 8
    anyone noticed that in iOS11 this all is broken and not scrolling correctly in some cases? – Peter Lapisu May 10 '18 at 10:41
  • 11
    @PeterLapisu self.tableView.scrollToRow(at: IndexPath(row: 0, section: 0), at: UITableViewScrollPosition.top, animated: true) seems to work in iOS 11 – Jordan Soltman Aug 6 '18 at 7:18
246
0

Note: This answer isn't valid for iOS 11 and later.

I prefer

[mainTableView setContentOffset:CGPointZero animated:YES];

If you have a top inset on your table view, you have to subtract it:

[mainTableView setContentOffset:CGPointMake(0.0f, -mainTableView.contentInset.top) animated:YES];
| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    Tomato, tomato. Hmm... That doesn't come across very clearly in writing. – FreeAsInBeer Apr 1 '12 at 2:29
  • 14
    This is the best way to use when you have table header or footer views and want them to be included too. – mafonya Aug 2 '12 at 20:52
  • 6
    This is indeed a clear code, but it does not work when your tableView has non-zero contentInset from the top. For example: tableView.contentInset = UIEdgeInsetsMake(5.0f, 0.0f, 250.0f, 0.0f);. If that is the case, in your code the tableView scrolls to (0.0f, 5.0f). – tolgamorf May 8 '13 at 20:36
  • 25
    The solution to my previous comment: [tableView setContentOffset:CGPointMake(0.0f, -tableView.contentInset.top) animated:YES]; – tolgamorf May 8 '13 at 20:40
  • 3
    On iOS 11 you should consider using -scrollView.adjustedContentInset.top instead. – Marián Černý Mar 4 '18 at 11:54
80
0

Possible Actions:

1

func scrollToFirstRow() {
    let indexPath = NSIndexPath(forRow: 0, inSection: 0)
    self.tableView.scrollToRowAtIndexPath(indexPath, atScrollPosition: .Top, animated: true)
}

2

func scrollToLastRow() {
    let indexPath = NSIndexPath(forRow: objects.count - 1, inSection: 0)
    self.tableView.scrollToRowAtIndexPath(indexPath, atScrollPosition: .Bottom, animated: true)
}

3

func scrollToSelectedRow() {
    let selectedRows = self.tableView.indexPathsForSelectedRows
    if let selectedRow = selectedRows?[0] as? NSIndexPath {
        self.tableView.scrollToRowAtIndexPath(selectedRow, atScrollPosition: .Middle, animated: true)
    }
}

4

func scrollToHeader() {
    self.tableView.scrollRectToVisible(CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: 1, height: 1), animated: true)
}

5

func scrollToTop(){
    self.tableView.setContentOffset(CGPointMake(0,  UIApplication.sharedApplication().statusBarFrame.height ), animated: true)
}

Disable Scroll To Top:

func disableScrollsToTopPropertyOnAllSubviewsOf(view: UIView) {
    for subview in view.subviews {
        if let scrollView = subview as? UIScrollView {
            (scrollView as UIScrollView).scrollsToTop = false
        }
        self.disableScrollsToTopPropertyOnAllSubviewsOf(subview as UIView)
    }
}

Modify and use it as per requirement.

Swift 4

  func scrollToFirstRow() {
    let indexPath = IndexPath(row: 0, section: 0)
    self.tableView.scrollToRow(at: indexPath, at: .top, animated: true)
  }
| improve this answer | |
  • Thats the solution, perfect - scrollToFirstRow – Mehul Nov 29 '16 at 6:28
  • Excellent summary. When you have section headers you'll have to use option4 scrollToHeader. – Vincent Jan 30 '17 at 8:40
  • Is there a way to scroll up to a searchbar that is above the Tableview? – Tyler Rutt Nov 1 '19 at 1:56
27
0

It's better to not use NSIndexPath (empty table), nor assume that top point is CGPointZero (content insets), that's what I use -

[tableView setContentOffset:CGPointMake(0.0f, -tableView.contentInset.top) animated:YES];

Hope this helps.

| improve this answer | |
  • No longer valid as of iOS 11. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:33
21
0

Swift 4:

This works very well:

//self.tableView.reloadData() if you want to use this line remember to put it before 
let indexPath = IndexPath(row: 0, section: 0)
self.tableView.scrollToRow(at: indexPath, at: .top, animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Not if you have a tableHeaderView in your tableView and it's inline (scrolls with the content) – finneycanhelp Mar 12 '18 at 19:48
  • 1
    I have both a plain and a UITableViewStyleGrouped (headers scrolls with the contents) and this code works. Be sure you are in the main thread and you launch this code after the view appear (viewDidAppear). If you still have problems try to put the code inside this: DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now()+0.1, execute: { // the code } – Alessandro Ornano Mar 12 '18 at 20:55
  • 1
    Thank you. It will get you to the first cell. However, it doesn't show the table view header. – finneycanhelp Mar 14 '18 at 1:13
  • This will fail if the tableView is empty for some reason (no cell in 0 section at 0 row) – Maxim Skryabin Jan 24 '19 at 8:49
19
0

I've encountered an issue calling trying some of the methods on an empty tableView. Here's another option for Swift 4 that handles empty tableviews.

extension UITableView {
  func hasRowAtIndexPath(indexPath: IndexPath) -> Bool {
    return indexPath.section < self.numberOfSections && indexPath.row < self.numberOfRows(inSection: indexPath.section)
  }

  func scrollToTop(animated: Bool) {
    let indexPath = IndexPath(row: 0, section: 0)
    if self.hasRowAtIndexPath(indexPath: indexPath) {
      self.scrollToRow(at: indexPath, at: .top, animated: animated)
    }
  }
}

Usage:

// from yourViewController or yourTableViewController
tableView.scrollToTop(animated: true)//or false
| improve this answer | |
  • This doesn't account for any table header or section header. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:35
16
0

DONT USE

 tableView.setContentOffset(.zero, animated: true)

It can sometimes set the offset improperly. For example, in my case, the cell was actually slightly above the view with safe area insets. Not good.

INSTEAD USE

 tableView.scrollToRow(at: IndexPath(row: 0, section: 0), at: .top, animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Perfect Solution. – Baby Groot Jun 11 '19 at 12:50
  • Neither of these solutions are valid. The first doesn't work under iOS 11 or later. The second doesn't work if the table view has a table header or the first section has a section header unless you really do want the first row at the top and don't care about showing any headers. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:28
  • @rmaddy what's the best solution? – ScottyBlades May 28 at 23:47
15
0

On iOS 11, use adjustedContentInset to correctly scroll to top for both cases when the in-call status bar is visible or not.

if (@available(iOS 11.0, *)) {
    [tableView setContentOffset:CGPointMake(0, -tableView.adjustedContentInset.top) animated:YES];
} else {
    [tableView setContentOffset:CGPointMake(0, -tableView.contentInset.top) animated:YES];
}

Swift:

if #available(iOS 11.0, *) {
    tableView.setContentOffset(CGPoint(x: 0, y: -tableView.adjustedContentInset.top), animated: true)
} else {
    tableView.setContentOffset(CGPoint(x: 0, y: -tableView.contentInset.top), animated: true)
}
| improve this answer | |
12
0

For tables that have a contentInset, setting the content offset to CGPointZero will not work. It'll scroll to the content top vs. scrolling to the table top.

Taking content inset into account produces this instead:

[tableView setContentOffset:CGPointMake(0, -tableView.contentInset.top) animated:NO];
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thank you, I kept setting it to CGPointZero and could not understand why this was happening. – johnrechd Feb 6 '18 at 17:00
  • No longer valid as of iOS 11. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:34
10
0

This code let's you scroll a specific section to top

CGRect cellRect = [tableinstance rectForSection:section];
CGPoint origin = [tableinstacne convertPoint:cellRect.origin 
                                    fromView:<tableistance>];
[tableinstance setContentOffset:CGPointMake(0, origin.y)];
| improve this answer | |
  • This was the simplest code and it worked OK. I actually putted CGPointMake(0.0f, 0.0f). Cheers! – Felipe Aug 31 '14 at 1:56
  • This code is very useful to make the section scroll top – srinivas n Sep 18 '14 at 12:01
8
0

Swift:

tableView.setContentOffset(CGPointZero, animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
  • No longer valid as of iOS 11. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:36
8
0

Swift 3

tableView.setContentOffset(CGPoint.zero, animated: true)

if tableView.setContentOffset don't work.

Use:

tableView.beginUpdates()
tableView.setContentOffset(CGPoint.zero, animated: true)
tableView.endUpdates()
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This isn't valid for iOS 11 or later. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:36
7
0

Since my tableView is full of all kinds of insets, this was the only thing that worked well:

Swift 3

if tableView.numberOfSections > 0 && tableView.numberOfRows(inSection: 0) > 0 {
  tableView.scrollToRow(at: IndexPath(row: 0, section: 0), at: .top, animated: true)
}

Swift 2

if tableView.numberOfSections > 0 && tableView.numberOfRowsInSection(0) > 0 {
  tableView.scrollToRowAtIndexPath(NSIndexPath(forRow: 0, inSection: 0), atScrollPosition: .Top, animated: true)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • this was more useful to me – Tejzeratul Aug 10 '17 at 22:06
  • great answer, appreciate it – Jeremy Bader Aug 14 '17 at 1:45
7
0

Adding on to what's already been said, you can create a extension (Swift) or category (Objective C) to make this easier in the future:

Swift:

extension UITableView {
    func scrollToTop(animated: Bool) {
        setContentOffset(CGPointZero, animated: animated)
    }
}

Any time you want to scroll any given tableView to the top you can call the following code:

tableView.scrollToTop(animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    No longer valid as of iOS 11. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:36
6
0

I prefer the following, as it takes into account an inset. If there is no inset, it will still scroll to the top as the inset will be 0.

tableView.setContentOffset(CGPoint(x: 0, y: -tableView.contentInset.top), animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
  • No longer valid as of iOS 11. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:37
5
0

Swift :

if you don't have tableView header :

tableView.setContentOffset(CGPointMake(0,  UIApplication.sharedApplication().statusBarFrame.height ), animated: true)

if so :

tableView.setContentOffset(CGPointMake(0, -tableViewheader.frame.height   + UIApplication.sharedApplication().statusBarFrame.height ), animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
5
0

Swift 5, iOS 13

I know this question already has a lot of answers but from my experience, there is only one method that always works:

tableView.scrollToRow(at: IndexPath(row: someArray.count - 1, section: 0), at: .bottom, animated: true)

If you're working in async, tables that animate with keyboards, etc., the other answers will often scroll to the almost bottom, not the absolute bottom. This method will get you to the absolute end of a table every time.

| improve this answer | |
  • You also need to check if there is a section – Onur Tuna Feb 2 at 13:11
4
0

Here's what I use to work correctly on iOS 11:

extension UIScrollView {
    func scrollToTop(animated: Bool) {
        var offset = contentOffset
        if #available(iOS 11, *) {
            offset.y = -adjustedContentInset.top
        } else {
            offset.y = -contentInset.top
        }
        setContentOffset(offset, animated: animated)
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
4
0

In Swift 5 , Thanks @Adrian's answer a lot

extension UITableView{

    func hasRowAtIndexPath(indexPath: IndexPath) -> Bool {
        return indexPath.section < numberOfSections && indexPath.row < numberOfRows(inSection: indexPath.section)
    }

    func scrollToTop(_ animated: Bool = false) {
        let indexPath = IndexPath(row: 0, section: 0)
        if hasRowAtIndexPath(indexPath: indexPath) {
            scrollToRow(at: indexPath, at: .top, animated: animated)
        }
    }

}

Usage:

tableView.scrollToTop()
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    1. This is also valid in Swift 4. 2. This doesn't work if there is a table header or a section header. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:39
3
0

using contentOffset is not the right way. this would be better as it is table view's natural way

tableView.scrollToRow(at: NSIndexPath.init(row: 0, section: 0) as IndexPath, at: .top, animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This won't work if there is a table header or a section header. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:38
3
0

This was the only code snippet that worked for me

Swift 4:

    tableView.scrollRectToVisible(CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: 1, height: 1), animated: true)
    tableView.scrollToRow(at: IndexPath(row: 0, section: 0), at: .top, animated: true)
    tableView.setContentOffset(CGPoint(x: 0, y: -70), animated: true)

P.S. 70 is the height of my header and table view cell

| improve this answer | |
  • This is far from the correct way to scroll to the top. It makes no sense to use three separate lines just to set the content offset. Only the last line is needed but hardcoding a specific offset is not the correct solution. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:41
2
0
func scrollToTop() {
        NSIndexPath *topItem = [NSIndexPath indexPathForItem:0 inSection:0];
        [tableView scrollToRowAtIndexPath:topItem atScrollPosition:UITableViewScrollPositionTop animated:YES];
}

call this function wherever you want UITableView scroll to top

| improve this answer | |
2
0

Swift 4 via extension, handles empty table view:

extension UITableView {
    func scrollToTop(animated: Bool) {
        self.setContentOffset(CGPoint.zero, animated: animated);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This isn't valid as of iOS 11. – rmaddy Aug 3 '19 at 5:38
2
0

I use tabBarController and i have a few section in my tableview at every tab, so this is best solution for me.

extension UITableView {

    func scrollToTop(){

        for index in 0...numberOfSections - 1 {
            if numberOfSections > 0 && numberOfRows(inSection: index) > 0 {
                scrollToRow(at: IndexPath(row: 0, section: index), at: .top, animated: true)
                break
            }

            if index == numberOfSections - 1 {
                setContentOffset(.zero, animated: true)
                break
            }
        }

    }

}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

I had to add the multiply by -1 * to the sum of the status bar and the navigation bar, because it was going that height off the screen,

self.tableView.setContentOffset(CGPointMake(0 , -1 * 
  (self.navigationController!.navigationBar.height +  
  UIApplication.sharedApplication().statusBarFrame.height) ), animated:true)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

in swift

your row = selectioncellRowNumber your section if you have = selectionNumber if you dont have set is to zero

//UITableViewScrollPosition.Middle or Bottom or Top

var lastIndex = NSIndexPath(forRow:  selectioncellRowNumber, inSection: selectionNumber)
self.tableView.scrollToRowAtIndexPath(lastIndex, atScrollPosition: UITableViewScrollPosition.Middle, animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Here Is The Code To ScrollTableView To Top Programatically

Swift:

self.TableView.setContentOffset(CGPointMake(0, 1), animated:true)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

In Swift-3 :

self.tableView.setContentOffset(CGPoint.zero, animated: true)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Here is a simple example of UIScrollView extension that you can use everywhere in your app.

1) First you should create enum with possible scroll directions:

enum ScrollDirection {
    case top, right, bottom, left

    func contentOffsetWith(_ scrollView: UIScrollView) -> CGPoint {
        var contentOffset = CGPoint.zero
        switch self {
            case .top:
                contentOffset = CGPoint(x: 0, y: -scrollView.contentInset.top)
            case .right:
                contentOffset = CGPoint(x: scrollView.contentSize.width - scrollView.bounds.size.width, y: 0)
            case .bottom:
                contentOffset = CGPoint(x: 0, y: scrollView.contentSize.height - scrollView.bounds.size.height)
            case .left:
                contentOffset = CGPoint(x: -scrollView.contentInset.left, y: 0)
            }
        return contentOffset
    }
}

2) Then add extension to UIScrollView:

extension UIScrollView {
    func scrollTo(direction: ScrollDirection, animated: Bool = true) {
        self.setContentOffset(direction.contentOffsetWith(self), animated: animated)
    }
}

3) Thats it! Now you can use it:

myScrollView.scrollTo(.top, animated: false)

This scroll bind to the tableView's content size and it looks more natural than scroll to CGPoint.zero

| improve this answer | |
0
0

If you i would like move scroll animation in the table, use this code. The scroll move to top with animation in .5 seconds.

[UIView beginAnimations:nil context:nil];
[UIView setAnimationDuration:0.5];
[UIView setAnimationCurve:UIViewAnimationCurveEaseOut];

[_tableContent scrollRectToVisible:CGRectMake(0, 0, 1, 1) animated:YES];

[UIView commitAnimations];
| improve this answer | |

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