14

In Range-based for loop on a temporary range, Barry mentioned that the following is not affected by the destroyed temporary object, and I tested member v indeed exists throughout the for-loop (as the destructor ~X didn't get called throughout the for-loop). What is the explanation?

struct X {
    std::vector<int> v;

    ~X()
    {
    }
};

X foo()
{
    return X();
}

for (auto e : foo().v) {
    // ok!
}
4
  • Why the doubt? Can you elaborate that more please? The question there is about something completely different? Jun 5 at 19:44
  • 1
    Are you familiar with temporary lifetime extension? This is a rather obscure form of it. Jun 5 at 19:48
  • Thanks, what I'm not clear about is that __range here is assigned to by X.v not X, v should be kept alive by this auto && __range = foo().v, however X() as a temporary object is not assigned to any reference so it should be destroyed after auto && __range = foo().v is executed? if so after it gets deleted as v is it's member value, v should also be deleted? Jun 5 at 19:51
  • 2
    I'm glad I answered this (even though I got the answer wrong), because I learned something. But I agree with @user177's comment below, I wouldn't write code like this. (in any context, not just a range-based for loop). Jun 5 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

17

This is an obscure form of temporary lifetime extension. Normally you have to bind the temporary directly to the reference for it to work (e.g. for (auto x : foo())), but according to cppreference, this effect propagates through:

  • parentheses ( ) (grouping, not a function call),
  • array access [ ] (not overloaded; must use an array and not a pointer),
  • member access ., .*,
  • ternary operator ? :,
  • comma operator , (not overloaded),
  • any cast that doesn't involve a "user-defined conversion" (presumably uses no constructors nor conversion operators)

I.e. if a.b is bound to a reference, the lifetime of a is extended.

3
  • 12
    Importantly this applies only through a direct data member access. If there was a e.g. a auto& getV() { return v; } member function and then for (auto e : foo().getV()) the extension wouldn't apply and the loop would indeed use a dangling reference, causing UB. So relying on something like this feels a bit risky. Jun 5 at 20:07
  • 1
    We should probably overload getters for 'r-value this' to return copies or better yet move things, e.g. auto getV()&& { return std::move(v); }, as per Nicolai Josuttis' advice, and then it'll probably work) And yet, I agree, relying on this behaviour is risky
    – Alex Vask
    Jun 6 at 15:42
  • Please emphasize that only array access, not general indexing, is covered. Jun 6 at 15:43
0

Temporary lifetime extension is achieved when a reference variable is bonded to a temporary directly, but not only. For the exact list of temporary lifetime extension, see in the specification: [class.temporary].

The answer provided by his holiness @HolyBlackCat is very good, but I feel some examples are required.

⦿ binding a temporary directly

// function prototype
std::string foo(); 

// calling foo:
const auto& b = foo(); // lifetime is extended, directly bind to a temporary

// also, similarly:
const std::string& s = "hi"; // lifetime is extended, the same

According to the language rules, temporary lifetime extension can be also achieved in any of the following cases:

⦿ parentheses ( ) (grouping, not a function call)

const auto& a = (foo()); // lifetime is extended, grouping with parenths is ok 
const std::string& s = ("hello "s + "world"); // lifetime is extended, the same

For the next cases, let's add the following struct:

struct A {
    std::string str = "hey";
    int arr[3] = {2, 3, 4};
    int* ptr = arr;
    const auto& foo() const {
        return str;
    }
};

⦿ member access ., .*

const auto& b1 = A().str; // lifetime of A() is extended
const auto& b2 = A().arr; // lifetime of A() is extended
const auto& b3 = A().ptr; // lifetime of A() is extended
// BUT -
const auto& b4 = *A().ptr; // lifetime of A() is NOT extended (b4 dangling)

// pointer to member access
const auto& str_ptr = &A::str;
const auto& arr_ptr = &A::arr;
const auto& ptr_ptr = &A::ptr;

const auto& c1 = A().*str_ptr; // lifetime of A() is extended
const auto& c2 = A().*arr_ptr; // lifetime of A() is extended
const auto& c3 = A().*ptr_ptr; // lifetime of A() is extended

// BUT - not for a member function
const auto& foo_ptr = &A::foo;
// below initialization is bounded to a function call result
// not to a member access
const auto& c4 = (A().*foo_ptr)(); // lifetime of A() is NOT extended (c4 dangling)

⦿ array access [ ] (not overloaded; must use an array and not a pointer)

const auto& d1 = A().arr[0]; // lifetime of A() is extended
// BUT - not for pointers
// pointer access with []
const auto& d2 = A().ptr[0]; // lifetime of A() is NOT extended (d2 dangling)
// neither for overloaded []
const auto& d3 = A().str[0]; // lifetime of A() is NOT extended (d3 dangling)

⦿ ternary operator ? :

const auto& e1 = true? A() : A(); // lifetime of the 1st A() is extended
const auto& e2 = false? A() : A(); // lifetime of the 2nd A() is extended

⦿ comma operator , (not overloaded)

const auto& f1 = (A(), A()); // lifetime of the 2nd A() is extended

⦿ any cast that doesn't involve a "user-defined conversion" (presumably uses no constructors nor conversion operators)

const auto& g1 = const_cast<const A&&>(A()); // lifetime of A() is extended

const double& g2 = A().arr[0]; // lifetime of A() is NOT extended
                               // but this is a valid ref to a double
                               // converted from an int, as a temporary

For a casting that doesn't extend lifetime, let's add an additional class:

class B {
    const A& a;
public:
    B(const A& a): a(a){}
};

The following casting goes through user-defined casting and thus will not extend the life time of A:

const auto& g3 = ((B&&)A()); // lifetime of A() is NOT extended (g3 dangling)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.