89

How can I extract whatever follows the last slash in a URL in Python? For example, these URLs should return the following:

URL: http://www.test.com/TEST1
returns: TEST1

URL: http://www.test.com/page/TEST2
returns: TEST2

URL: http://www.test.com/page/page/12345
returns: 12345

I've tried urlparse, but that gives me the full path filename, such as page/page/12345.

11 Answers 11

207

You don't need fancy things, just see the string methods in the standard library and you can easily split your url between 'filename' part and the rest:

url.rsplit('/', 1)

So you can get the part you're interested in simply with:

url.rsplit('/', 1)[-1]
  • 9
    url.rsplit('/', 1) returns a list, and url.rsplit('/', 1)[-1] is the bit after the last slash. – Hugo Oct 13 '15 at 12:26
  • 5
    Another way to do would be: url.rsplit('/', 1).pop() – Alex-Antoine Fortin Mar 2 '18 at 17:55
58

One more (idio(ma)tic) way:

URL.split("/")[-1]
14

rsplit should be up to the task:

In [1]: 'http://www.test.com/page/TEST2'.rsplit('/', 1)[1]
Out[1]: 'TEST2'
8

You can do like this:

head, tail = os.path.split(url)

Where tail will be your file name.

6

urlparse is fine to use if you want to (say, to get rid of any query string parameters).

import urllib.parse

urls = [
    'http://www.test.com/TEST1',
    'http://www.test.com/page/TEST2',
    'http://www.test.com/page/page/12345',
    'http://www.test.com/page/page/12345?abc=123'
]

for i in urls:
    url_parts = urllib.parse.urlparse(i)
    path_parts = url_parts[2].rpartition('/')
    print('URL: {}\nreturns: {}\n'.format(i, path_parts[2]))

Output:

URL: http://www.test.com/TEST1
returns: TEST1

URL: http://www.test.com/page/TEST2
returns: TEST2

URL: http://www.test.com/page/page/12345
returns: 12345

URL: http://www.test.com/page/page/12345?abc=123
returns: 12345
2
extracted_url = url[url.rfind("/")+1:];
  • forgot the from string import rfind from your answer – Kimvais Aug 31 '11 at 7:29
2

Here's a more general, regex way of doing this:

    re.sub(r'^.+/([^/]+)$', r'\1', url)
1
os.path.basename(os.path.normpath('/folderA/folderB/folderC/folderD/'))

folderD

0

partition and rpartition are also handy for such things:

url.rpartition('/')[2]
0

Split the url and pop the last element url.split('/').pop()

-1
url ='http://www.test.com/page/TEST2'.split('/')[4]
print url

Output: TEST2.

  • 2
    You really should pass -1 as the index, otherwise this only works on strings with exactly that many / – Chris_Rands Sep 30 '16 at 7:24

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