4

I have a const std::vector<T> source of a big size, and a std::vector<T> dest. I want to apply a transformation to each element in source and store it in dest; all of this in parallel, and knowing that T is not default constructible.

What I initially attempted was using std::transform with a parallel execution policy:

std::transform(std::execution::par_unseq,
  source.begin(), source.end(),
  dest.begin(),
  [](const T& elem) { return op(elem); }
);

However, when I first compiled and run this, to my surprise, I discovered that, although the transform "loops" for source.size() times, dest's content remains unchanged.

I discovered that this is because dest must have the same size of source prior to the transform. However, I cannot do resize dest to the size of source, because T is not default constructible as it does not have a default constructor. I also would prefer not to provide a default constructor for it (first of all, it does not make sense in T's logic, but you can think that it would be expensive to call).

Does C++ STL offer any other algorithm for achieving what I have in mind?

What would suffice is an algorithm where each thread computes its own part of the source vector, and then the results are collected and joined into the same dest vector.

19
  • A for_each that pushes the result into the destination vector? Jun 8 at 22:45
  • 7
    The requirement that this must be done in parallel and that result is initially empty seems to suggest that there would be concurrency issues in pushing the transformed elements :(
    – steddy
    Jun 8 at 22:48
  • 1
    Is T moveable? Jun 8 at 23:01
  • 1
    I recommend performing the transformation in blocks that perform in parallel. For example, load source into the data cache, load destination into the data cache, then transform in parallel. Repeat. Jun 8 at 23:04
  • 3
    There are some tricks to resize a vector without calling the per element constructor. See this: stackoverflow.com/a/11925009/1383356
    – Ari
    Jun 9 at 0:32

3 Answers 3

5

Try using a std::vector<> of std::optional<T>:

#include <algorithm>
#include <execution>
#include <optional>
#include <vector>

struct T { // NOTE: T is NOT default-constructible!
    T(int x) : value(x) {}
    operator int() { return value; }
    int value;
};

T op(const T& in) {
    return in.value * 2;
}

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    const std::vector<T> source = {4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11};
    std::vector<std::optional<T>> dest(source.size());

    std::transform(
        std::execution::par_unseq,
        source.begin(), source.end(),
        dest.begin(),
        [](const T& elem) { return op(elem); }
    );
    for (auto i : dest) {
        std::cout << *i << " ";
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

Sample output: 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22

Godbolt demo: https://godbolt.org/z/ecf95cneq

This is admittedly not that idiomatic, as your dest array now has every element wrapped up in an std::optional<> container, but I believe it otherwise offers the semantics you specify.

4
  • Definitely the answer I will accept. Before closing, I will wait a bit if someone else's has a more idiomatic approach. Thank you!
    – steddy
    Jun 8 at 23:55
  • Thank you, yes, I am interested to see if there is a better approach than this one. The only other approaches I can think of are: create your own vector-like container class that provides the allocation semantics you specify (a lot of work to go through for one thing!) or maybe writing your own custom allocator, but I have no experience of doing that second one so I can't say for sure...
    – saxbophone
    Jun 8 at 23:58
  • An inventive solution, I like it. Jun 9 at 16:15
  • @saxbophone After a bit of thought, posted my own modest effort :) Jun 12 at 23:30
1

Also inspired by @saxbophone's answer, here's a solution that avoids the (minor) overhead that std::optional introduces. It is based on the following simple, roll-your own container:

template <class T> class SimpleVector
{
public:
    SimpleVector (size_t capacity) :
        m_capacity (capacity), storage (static_cast <T *> (malloc (capacity * sizeof (T)))) { }
    ~SimpleVector () { free (storage); }

    T *data () { return storage; }
    T &operator [] (size_t i) { return storage [i]; }
    T *begin () { return storage; }
    T *end () { return storage + m_capacity; }

private:
    size_t m_capacity;
    T *storage;
};

This requires one T to be constructed and subsequently moved for each element generated by std::transform, which is the same as the std::optional solution (I did test this). Note the use of malloc and free to avoid default-constructing any Ts.

The complete code is here and looks like this (it generates the same output as @sax):

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <execution>
#include <vector>
#include <utility>

template <class T> class SimpleVector
{
public:
    SimpleVector (size_t capacity) :
        m_capacity (capacity), storage (static_cast <T *> (malloc (capacity * sizeof (T)))) { }
    ~SimpleVector () { free (storage); }

    T *data () { return storage; }
    T &operator [] (size_t i) { return storage [i]; }
    T *begin () { return storage; }
    T *end () { return storage + m_capacity; }

private:
    size_t m_capacity;
    T *storage;
};

struct T
{
    T (int x) : value (x) { }
    operator int () const { return value; }
    int value;
};

T op (const T& in) { return in.value * 2; }

int main ()
{
    const std::vector <T> source = {4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11};
    SimpleVector <T> dest (source.size ());

    std::transform (std::execution::par_unseq,
        source.cbegin (), source.cend (), dest.begin (),
        [] (const T& elem) { return op (elem); } );

    for (const auto &it : dest) { std::cout << it << " "; }
}

Feel free to use SimpleVector for anything you like if you so choose. You can always add accessor / convenience methods to it if you need them.

0

Inspired by @saxbophone answer, you could also use a vector of pointers.

Credit for the code template to @saxbophone.

#include <algorithm>
#include <execution>
#include <optional>
#include <vector>

struct T { // NOTE: T is NOT default-constructible!
    T(int x) : value(x) {}
    operator int() { return value; }
    int value;
};

T* op(const T& in) {
    return new T(in.value*2);
}

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    const std::vector<T> source = {4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11};
    std::vector<T*> dest(source.size());

    std::transform(
        std::execution::par_unseq,
        source.begin(), source.end(),
        dest.begin(),
        [](const T& elem) { return op(elem); }
    );
    for (auto i : dest) {
        std::cout << *i << " ";
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    // Don't forget to delete dest.
}

Live example: https://godbolt.org/z/r73qr1ze3

4
  • 2
    A vector of std:: unique_ptrs would make more sense, but.this approach is not cache-friendly. Jun 9 at 12:20
  • I agree. But nor is std:: optional, right?
    – Ari
    Jun 9 at 14:32
  • 2
    std::optional is a weird duck. It's not allowed to dynamically allocate, so whether or not the value is present, the memory for it is. std::optional will be as cache friendly as the contained class allows it to be. Jun 9 at 15:26
  • 1
    @user4581301 good point about optional, it looks like it uses placement-new to ensure the behaviour that you mention: stackoverflow.com/questions/25844598/…
    – saxbophone
    Jun 9 at 20:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.