18

Consider the following situation

// Global
int x = 0; // not atomic

// Thread 1
x = 1;

// Thread 2
if (false)
    x = 2;

Does this constitute a data race according to the standard? [intro.races] says:

Two expression evaluations conflict if one of them modifies a memory location (4.4) and the other one reads or modifies the same memory location.

The execution of a program contains a data race if it contains two potentially concurrent conflicting actions, at least one of which is not atomic, and neither happens before the other, except for the special case for signal handlers described below. Any such data race results in undefined behavior.

Is it safe from a language-lawyer perspective, because the program can never be allowed to perform the "expression evaluation" x = 2;?

From a technical standpoint, what if some weird, stupid compiler decided to perform a speculative execution of this write, rolling it back after checking the actual condition?

What inspired this question is the fact that (at least in Standard 11), the following program was allowed to have its result depend entirely on reordering/speculative execution:

// Thread 1:
r1 = y.load(std::memory_order_relaxed);
if (r1 == 42) x.store(r1, std::memory_order_relaxed);
// Thread 2:
r2 = x.load(std::memory_order_relaxed);
if (r2 == 42) y.store(42, std::memory_order_relaxed);
// This is allowed to result in r1==r2==42 in c++11

(compare https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/atomic/memory_order)

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  • 1
    which decent compiler will emit code from if (0) ?
    – OznOg
    Commented Jun 9, 2022 at 14:04
  • 3
    @Fareanor, Re, "the code will never be executed anyway." The question is not about what any sane implementation would do. The question is about what a language-lawyer thinks the standard might allow an implementation to do. OP asked specifically about an implementation that starts to perform the x=2 assignment concurrently with testing the if condition, and which then cancels or "rolls back" the operation upon discovering that the condition is false. Commented Jun 9, 2022 at 14:20
  • 3
    Relevant question for C: Can code that will never be executed invoke undefined behavior? Commented Jun 9, 2022 at 14:29
  • 2
    @SolomonSlow: Your idea about "rolling back" is not far-fetched; an [[likely]] annotation might reasonably cause a compiler to use a rollback for the unlikely scenario. But the C++ standard uses a theoretical execution model in which such rollbacks do not happen. In that theoretical model , Fareanor is right, the code is not executed. Language-lawyers care about this theoretical model. And implementations generally must behave as-if they implement the theoretical execution model.
    – MSalters
    Commented Jun 9, 2022 at 15:55
  • 2
    @DanielLangr: Also highly related: What formally guarantees that non-atomic variables can't see out-of-thin-air values and create a data race like atomic relaxed theoretically can? - the out-of-thin-air problem is just a gap in the formalism for mo_relaxed, and not something that applies to plain objects. (And not something that any real implementation will allow for atomics either; the C++ committee intends to forbid it.) Introducing data races that affect behaviour would violate the as-if rule. (See also lwn.net/Articles/793253) Commented Jun 9, 2022 at 23:50

2 Answers 2

20

The key term is "expression evaluation". Take the very simple example:

int a = 0;
for (int i = 0; i != 10; ++i) 
   ++a;

There's one expression ++a, but 10 evaluations. These are all ordered: the 5th evaluation happens-before the 6th evaluation. And the evaluations of ++a are interleaved with the evaluations of i!=10.

So, in

int a = 0;
for (int i = 0; i != 0; ++i) 
   ++a;

there are 0 evaluations. And by a trivial rewrite, that gets us

int a = 0;
if (false)
   ++a;

Now, if there are 10 evaluations of ++a, we need to worry for all 10 evaluations if they race with another thread (in more complex cases, the answer might vary - say if you start a thread when a==5). But if there are no evaluations at all of ++a, then there's clearly no racing evaluation.

0
6

Does this constitute a data race according to the standard?

No, data races are concerned with access to storage locations in expressions which are actually evaluated as your quote states. In if (false) x = 2; the expression x = 2; is never evaluated. Hence it doesn't matter at all to determining the presence of data races.

Is it safe from a language-lawyer perspective, because the program can never be allowed to perform the "expression evaluation" x = 2;?

Yes.

From a technical standpoint, what if some weird, stupid compiler decided to perform a speculative execution of this write, rolling it back after checking the actual condition?

It is not allowed to do that if it could affect the observable behavior of the program. Otherwise it may do that, but it is impossible to observe the difference.

What inspired this question is the fact that (at least in Standard 11), the following program was allowed to have its result depend entirely on reordering/speculative execution:

That's a completely different situation. This program also doesn't have any data races, since the only variables that are accessed in both threads are atomics, which can never have data races. It merely has potentially multiple valid results, meaning a race condition. A data race would always imply undefined behavior, not merely unspecified behavior.

Also the out-of-thin-air issue appears only as a result of the circular dependence of the accesses between multiple atomics. In your initial example there is only one variable, non-atomic and without any such circular dependence.

6
  • "if it could affect the observable behavior of the program" — but it doesn't affect the observable behavior if the program is well-formed (e.g. if the threads are separated in time). So the compiler actually can do this speculative execution.
    – Ruslan
    Commented Jun 10, 2022 at 10:51
  • @Ruslan The program is also well-formed if the threads are executing at the same time, in which case the compiler may not introduce such a speculative store if that could on the machine level e.g. result in tearing with a final value of x different from 1 being observable. Of course that paragraph of my answer is actually pretty pointless, since it is simply restating the general as-if rule that a compiler can translate the program in any way that preserves the observable behavior under the rules of the abstract machine. Commented Jun 10, 2022 at 10:59
  • The point is that the final value is expected to be 1 in presence of speculation. E.g. the speculative execution (however idiosyncratic it may be) could do like this: int t=x; x=2; if(true) x=t; This will write the original value into x in the end, but write 2 during the execution, which would be non-observable if the other thread didn't exist.
    – Ruslan
    Commented Jun 10, 2022 at 14:24
  • @Ruslan Yes, but if the other thread does exist, then there can be an observable difference (depending on the architecture and how exactly the statements are translated). If so, the compiler is not allowed to make that speculation, otherwise it is. That's all I am saying. Commented Jun 10, 2022 at 16:26
  • If the other thread does exist, and it accesses the same variable as the first thread, they must use some means of synchronization, otherwise we have a data race, whose behavior is undefined. Thus, from the point of view of the Standard, the value of x is still not observable.
    – Ruslan
    Commented Jun 10, 2022 at 16:41

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