23

I have Preprocessor.h

#define MAX_FILES 15

struct Preprocessor {
    FILE fileVector[MAX_FILES];
    int currentFile;
};

typedef struct Preprocessor Prepro;

void Prepro_init(Prepro* p) {
    (*p).currentFile = 0;
}

I realized then that I had to separate declarations from definitions. So I created Preprocessor.c:

#define MAX_FILES 15

struct Preprocessor {
    FILE fileVector[MAX_FILES];
    int currentFile;
};

typedef struct Preprocessor Prepro;

And Preprocessor.h is now:

void Prepro_init(Prepro* p) {
    (*p).currentFile = 0;
}

That obviously, doesn't work because Pr..h doesn't know Prepro type. I already tried several combinations, none of them worked. I can't find the solution.

  • 1
    no forward-declaration here.. – Karoly Horvath Aug 31 '11 at 15:19
  • 5
    Note that, if you use pointers to structs a lot, you'll find the -> operator quite useful. (*p).currentFile can be written as p->currentFile. – Chris Lutz Aug 31 '11 at 15:26
  • This is C. I'm almost sure you can't do that in C. – erandros Aug 31 '11 at 15:38
  • 3
    @Erandros No, the -> operator is very much valid in C as well as C++ – Praetorian Aug 31 '11 at 17:07
  • 1
    You're right, -> is valid in C. – erandros Aug 31 '11 at 18:24
25

Move the typedef struct Preprocessor Prepro; to the header the file and the definition in the c file along with the Prepro_init definition. This is will forward declare it for you with no issues.

Preprocessor.h

#ifndef _PREPROCESSOR_H_
#define _PREPROCESSOR_H_

#define MAX_FILES 15

typedef struct Preprocessor Prepro;

void Prepro_init(Prepro* p);

#endif

Preprocessor.c

#include "Preprocessor.h"

#include <stdio.h>

struct Preprocessor {
    FILE fileVector[MAX_FILES];
    int currentFile;
};

void Prepro_init(Prepro* p) {
    (*p).currentFile = 0;
}
  • 4
    Preprocessor may be a poor name choice but thats up to you :) Also FILE is often referenced with a pointer, FILE * – Joe Aug 31 '11 at 15:25
  • 1
    I'd put the actual struct definition in another header so you could split your implementation into different source files as well. That'd make it easier to get the function you want. – Chris Lutz Aug 31 '11 at 15:28
  • @Chris Lutz: Maybe he wants it to be an opaque type – Praetorian Aug 31 '11 at 15:30
  • OK for .h file, but now, the c file doesn't know what Prepro is. – erandros Aug 31 '11 at 15:37
  • 1
    @Erandros : the way it's set up here, you can not access the currentFile member (or any member for that matter) outside of the Preprocessor.c file. If you need to be able to do that, you'll need to put the definition for struct Preprocessor in the header file, and include the header file wherever you want to use it. – Sander De Dycker Aug 31 '11 at 15:59
8

If you want to hide the definition of Preprocessor, you can simply put this in the header file :

struct Preprocessor;
typedef struct Preprocessor Prepro;

But more generally, you'll probably also need the Preprocessor definition in the header file, to allow other code to actually use it.

  • 8
    The first line is unnecessary, as the second will also declare that struct Preprocessor exists without defining it. – Chris Lutz Aug 31 '11 at 15:24
  • @Chris : I know, but thought it'd make things clearer by explicitly showing the forward declaration. – Sander De Dycker Aug 31 '11 at 15:31
  • 1
    You should also mention that the only possible uses of the Prepro type are through pointers. The definition of the type will then go in the .c file and the implementation will be the only to know the internals of Prepro. – amso Sep 1 '11 at 8:27
1

You have put in .c what should be in .h, and vice versa. Prepro_init must be in .c file, and that file must #include "Preprocessor.h".

-1

I would suggest that you follow Linus[1], and do not use typedef struct.

If you are in control over the library:

Include file

struct Foo;

int foo_get_n(const struct Foo *bar);

In implementation file

struct Foo
{int n;};

int foo_get_n(const struct Foo *bar)
{return bar->n;}

If you are not in control over the library:

Ask the maintainer to remove these polluting typedefs from the include files.

Summary

Do not use typedef struct.

[1] http://yarchive.net/comp/linux/typedefs.html

-2

YAS:Yet Another Solution.

Preprocessor.h

<some code>
    void Prepro_init(Prepro* p) {
        (*p).currentFile = 0;
    }
<some code>

Preprocessor.c

#define MAX_FILES 15

struct Preprocessor {
    FILE fileVector[MAX_FILES];
    int currentFile;
};
typedef struct Preprocessor Prepro;

#include "Preprocessor.h"      //include after defining your structure.

         <some code> 
        {
              struct Prepro p;
              Prepro_init(p);
     <some code> 
          .... using p.currentFile.....
          .....using other members....
     <some code> 
        }
           <some code> 

Now it will work. I think this is your requirement. Hope it helps.

Drawback: The members of the structure Preprocessor, must be predetermined. i.e the header file uses the member currentFile. So, c file which includes Preprocessor.h must have a structure which is typedefined as Prepro and that structure must include a member currentFile.(in this case).

The same problem I had a year before, while writting a header file to display a users Avl tree in a graphical tree format.

-2

Swap .h and .c file. Include header in .c.

Also refer to a book about declarations, definitions and what header files do.

  • 1
    Do you have any recommendation? – erandros Aug 31 '11 at 15:40
  • Any decent book will do, stroustrup / meyers / sutter. – Karoly Horvath Aug 31 '11 at 16:35
  • 2
    Those are C++ books, are you sure it will be the same for C? C++ is a lot easier to forward. – erandros Aug 31 '11 at 17:02

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