I want to compress a JPG image file with ImageMagick but can't get much difference in size. By default the output size is bigger than the input. I don't know why, but after adding some +profile options and setting down the quality I can get an smaller size but still similar to original.

The input image is 255kb, the processed image is 264kb (using +profile to remove profiles and setting quality to 70%). Is there any way to compress that image to 150kb at least? Is that possible? What ImageMagick options can I use?

  • 3
    Recompressing a JPEG will always result in a degraded image, even if it's larger. It would be better if you could start with the original before it was saved the first time. – Mark Ransom Aug 31 '11 at 18:55
  • I know, but unfortunately i dont have the original image, all i have is a big jpg file, but i think i can get a good balance between quality and size – Javis Perez Aug 31 '11 at 20:21
up vote 347 down vote accepted

I use always:

  • quality in 85
  • progressive (comprobed compression)
  • a very tiny gausssian blur to optimize the size (0.05 or 0.5 of radius) depends on the quality and size of the picture, this notably optimizes the size of the jpeg.
  • Strip any comment or exif tag

in imagemagick should be

convert -strip -interlace Plane -gaussian-blur 0.05 -quality 85% source.jpg result.jpg

hope this be useful.

Source link: http://www.yuiblog.com/blog/2008/12/05/imageopt-4/

From @Fordi in the comments (don't forget to thumbs up his comment if you like): If you dislike blurring, use -sampling-factor 4:2:0 instead. What this does is reduce the chroma channel's resolution to half, without messing with the luminance resolution that your eyes latch onto. If you want better fidelity in the conversion, you can get a slight improvement without an increase in filesize by specifying -define jpeg:dct-method=float - that is, use the more accurate floating point discrete cosine transform, rather than the default fast integer version.

  • 2
    Thank you! this code got me the image to 170kb, now i can go and experiment with your code thank you, also i've found the -define:extent=MAX_SIZE_IN_KB option that really helps, thank you! – Javis Perez Aug 31 '11 at 20:22
  • 29
    If you're doing a bunch of files, you can also do mogrify -strip -interlace Plane -gaussian-blur 0.05 -quality 85% *.jpg. Make sure you have a backup before running that command. It will write in place. – Richard Ayotte Mar 8 '13 at 20:03
  • 3
    -strip did it for me. Thanks – Nigel Angel Mar 14 '13 at 14:03
  • 31
    I got very blurry images. It seems counterproductive to intentionally blur the image to save space. Wouldn't it make more sense to just use a lower quality %? The quality-changing process is pretty good at saving space while maintaining apparent image quality. I put a 0.05 gaussian blur on my image and it saved some space but looked like utter crap. I settled on using mogrify -strip -quality 75% *.jpg. Strip is great. 0 quality loss, and large space savings. And quality at 75% is barely distinguishable from 100%, but takes half the space. – Buttle Butkus Apr 12 '13 at 6:51
  • 68
    If you dislike blurring, use -sampling-factor 4:2:0 instead. What this does is reduce the chroma channel's resolution to half, without messing with the luminance resolution that your eyes latch onto. If you want better fidelity in the conversion, you can get a slight improvement without an increase in filesize by specifying -define jpeg:dct-method=float - that is, use the more accurate floating point discrete cosine transform, rather than the default fast integer version. – Fordi Jun 19 '14 at 12:47

I'm using the Google Pagespeed Insights image optimization guidelines, and for ImageMagick they recommend the following:

-sampling-factor 4:2:0
-strip
-quality 85 [it can vary, I use range 60-80]
-interlace
-colorspace RGB

Command in ImageMagick:

convert image.jpg -sampling-factor 4:2:0 -strip -quality 85 -interlace JPEG -colorspace RGB image_converted.jpg

With these options I get up to 40% savings in JPEG size without much visible loss.

Just saying for those who using Imagick class in PHP:

$im -> gaussianBlurImage(0.8, 10);      //blur
$im -> setImageCompressionQuality(85);  //set compress quality to 85

Once I needed to resize photos from camera for developing:

  • Original filesize: 2800 kB
  • Resolution: 3264x2448

Command:

mogrify -quality "97%" -resize 2048x2048 -filter Lanczos -interlace Plane -gaussian-blur 0.05 
  • Result filesize 753 kB
  • Resolution 2048x2048

and I can't see any changes in full screen with my 1920x1080 resolution monitor. 2048 resolution is the best for developing 10 cm photos at maximum quality of 360 dpi. I don't want to strip it.

edit: I noticed that I even get much better results without blurring. Without blurring filesize is 50% of original, but quality is better (when zooming).

  • You don't have to add "-filter Lanczos". It's set by default imagemagick.org/script/command-line-options.php#filter – Ilya Prokin Sep 22 '16 at 15:04
  • as have been said above - it's useless to lower image resolution to make the file smaller. Lower the JPEG quality instead! You can test it yourself - compare two images one with 97% JPEG and anothern converted to let's say 68% and you will really have a hard time seeing any pixels being different even if you look at 100% zoom! Stock camera and phone's settings is ridiculously high just to make you wanna buy new phones with bigger storage and bigger HDDs for your PCs... photo.stackexchange.com/questions/30243/… – McVitas Apr 23 '17 at 15:54

I would add an useful side note and a general suggestion to minimize JPG and PNG.

First of all, ImageMagick reads (or better "guess"...) the input jpeg compression level and so if you don't add -quality NN at all, the output should use the same level as input. Sometimes could be an important feature. Otherwise the default level is -quality 92 (see www.imagemagick.org)

The suggestion is about a really awesome free tool ImageOptim, also for batch process.
You can get smaller jpgs (and pngs as well, especially after the use of the free ImageAlpha [not batch process] or the free Pngyu if you need batch process).
Not only, these tools are for Mac and Win and as Command Line (I suggest installing using Brew and then searching in Brew formulas).

I added -adaptive-resize 60% to the suggested command, but with -quality 60%.

convert -strip -interlace Plane -gaussian-blur 0.05 -quality 60% -adaptive-resize 60% img_original.jpg img_resize.jpg

These were my results

  • img_original.jpg = 13,913KB
  • img_resized.jpg = 845KB

I'm not sure if that conversion destroys my image too much, but I honestly didn't think my conversion looked like crap. It was a wide angle panorama and I didn't care for meticulous obstruction.

Here's a complete solution for those using Imagick in PHP:

$im = new \Imagick($filePath);
$im->setImageCompression(\Imagick::COMPRESSION_JPEG);
$im->setImageCompressionQuality(85);
$im->stripImage();
$im->setInterlaceScheme(\Imagick::INTERLACE_PLANE);

// Try between 0 or 5 radius. If you find radius of 5 
// produces too blurry  pictures decrease to 0 until you 
// find a good balance between size and quality. 
$im->gaussianBlurImage(0.05, 5);



// Include this part if you also want to specify a maximum size for the images

$size = $im->getImageGeometry();
$maxWidth = 1920;
$maxHeight = 1080;


// ----------
// |        |
// ----------
if($size['width'] >= $size['height']){
  if($size['width'] > $maxWidth){
    $im->resizeImage($maxWidth, 0, \Imagick::FILTER_LANCZOS, 1);
  }
}


// ------
// |    |
// |    |
// |    |
// |    |
// ------
else{
  if($size['height'] > $maxHeight){
    $im->resizeImage(0, $maxHeight, \Imagick::FILTER_LANCZOS, 1);
  }
}

Did some experimenting myself here and boy does that Gausian blur make a nice different. The final command I used was:

mogrify * -sampling-factor 4:2:0 -strip -quality 88 -interlace Plane -define jpeg:dct-method=float -colorspace RGB -gaussian-blur 0.05

Without the Gausian blur at 0.05 it was around 261kb, with it it was around 171KB for the image I was testing on. The visual difference on a 1440p monitor with a large complex image is not noticeable until you zoom way way in.

@JavisPerez -- Is there any way to compress that image to 150kb at least? Is that possible? What ImageMagick options can I use?

See the following links where there is an option in ImageMagick to specify the desired output file size for writing to JPG files.

http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/formats/#jpg_write http://www.imagemagick.org/script/command-line-options.php#define

-define jpeg:extent={size} As of IM v6.5.8-2 you can specify a maximum output filesize for the JPEG image. The size is specified with a suffix. For example "400kb".

convert image.jpg -define jpeg:extent=150kb result.jpg

You will lose some quality by decompressing and recompressing in addition to any loss due to lowering -quality value from the input.

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