4

Why is the assignment in the following snippet allowed?

#[derive(Copy, Clone)]
pub struct X {
    pub a: u8,
}

fn main() {
    let x = X { a: 0 };
    { x }.a = 5;
    assert!(x.a == 5); // I was wrong
}

Am I assigning to a temporary?

Although these are forbidden:

({ x.a }) = 5;
let mut y: u8 = 0;
({ y }) = 5;

I ask, because I had a bug like

unsafe { *some_struct }.mem1 = 5;

I didn't use

unsafe { *some_struct.mem1 = 5; }

from the beginning, because it felt right to keep unsafe blocks as short as possible.

5
  • Remove Copy from the struct X, then you will see the error. Do not derive Copy unless absolutely necessary. Use explicit .clone() instead.
    – Finomnis
    Commented Jun 16, 2022 at 23:23
  • You can implicitly mutate an owned, temporary value before it is bound to a non mut binding.
    – MeetTitan
    Commented Jun 17, 2022 at 0:32
  • @Finomnis This is actually against Rust API guidelines that say you should implement Copy whenever you can (and rightfully so). Commented Jun 17, 2022 at 1:11
  • When should my type be Copy? "Generally speaking, if your type can implement Copy, it should. Keep in mind, though, that implementing Copy is part of the public API of your type. If the type might become non-Copy in the future, it could be prudent to omit the Copy implementation now, to avoid a breaking API change." Commented Jun 17, 2022 at 1:14
  • I stand corrected. Thank you.
    – Finomnis
    Commented Jun 17, 2022 at 6:19

2 Answers 2

5

Yes, you are assigning to a temporary, because X implement Copy, so doing { x } you are creating a block that return x, but X implement Copy, so your block return a copy of x. Your block is basicly this:

#[derive(Copy, Clone)]
pub struct X {
    pub a: u8,
}

fn main() {
    let x = X { a: 0 };
    let mut tmp = { x };
    tmp.a = 5;
    assert_eq(x.a, 0);
    assert_eq!(tmp.a, 5);
}

What you can do to make the block return the actual variable instead of the copy is to transform the pointer to a mutable reference, and return that ref from the unsafe block:

#[derive(Copy, Clone)]
pub struct X {
    pub a: u8,
}

fn main() {
    let mut x = X { a: 0 };
    let ptr: *mut X = &mut x;

    unsafe {
        &mut *ptr
    }.a = 5;
    
    assert_eq!(x.a, 5);
}

Why is it allowed? It is allowed because Rust lets you modify temporaries, because a lot of things would be very verbose otherwise, like:

fn get_first<T>(vec: Vec<T>) -> Option<T> {
  let first = vec.into_iter().next();
  //                         ^ temporary iterator
  first
}

next() needs a mutable ref to the iterator. Having to bind it to a mutable variable would mean that you would have to write:

fn get_first<T>(vec: Vec<T>) -> Option<T> {
  let mut iter = vec.into_iter();
  let first = iter.next();
  first
}

The snippets of forbidden code that you provided don't satisfy the compiler because you try to assign a value to another value, not to a variable: doing { var } creates a block that return the value in the variable, so:

({ x.a }) = 5;
//       ^ block return the value in x.a
let mut y: u8 = 0;
({ y }) = 5;
//     ^ same here, return the value in y

You can consume this temporary, but not overwrite it, this is intentional and a good thing. I think in C++ they call this lvalue and rvalue, the block return a rvalue, and you can't assign to a rvalue.

But yes the compiler don't see { x }.a as a temporary, which is a bit silly, there is no use case that I can think of, and can create confusion.

5
  • @prog-fh Because the block return a new temporary copy, but is assigned to nothing and used right away, so rust let you use it as a mut variable, if this was not the case a lot of things would be very verbose, like iterators: you can do vec.into_iter().next(), next need a mutable ref, so if using temporary needed mut binding you would need to assign the iterator before using it
    – Bamontan
    Commented Jun 16, 2022 at 23:39
  • 1
    Yes, you should include this in your answer.
    – prog-fh
    Commented Jun 16, 2022 at 23:42
  • 1
    @prog-fh done, thanks for pointing me the real question there
    – Bamontan
    Commented Jun 16, 2022 at 23:50
  • I understand why a temporary is mutable. I don't understand why in my first snippet the temporary is assignable but not in the second snippet. Does the second snippet involve a temporary too? If so, why can't it be assigned? Is it a special diagnostic case?
    – nicolai
    Commented Jun 17, 2022 at 9:09
  • @nicolai I just added more details, does that asnswer your question ? I tried to look if their is an issue opened and don't find any, I think you can open one to Rust and let them know of this. The real problem is the assignement to a member of a temporary struct, this indeed should'nt be allowed
    – Bamontan
    Commented Jun 17, 2022 at 14:48
1

I tried to simplify as much as possible the initial example. No more Copy or Clone are involved; only temporaries are explicitly created.

The first attempt with 1 and 11 is quite normal; nothing more to be said.

The second attempt with 2 is totally useless since the created temporary disappears right after its creation (no side effect, this will probably be optimised out).

The third attempt with 3 and 33 is even more useless than the previous one since we alter the temporary just before it disappears (no more side effect, this will probably be optimised out).

The fourth attempt with 4 and 44 directly relates to the question. Although it is as useless as the two previous attempts, it is rejected by the compiler. The error code is E0070 and rustc --explain E0070 says:

The left-hand side of an assignment operator must be a place expression. A place expression represents a memory location and can be a variable (with optional namespacing), a dereference, an indexing expression or a field reference.

The section Place Expressions and Value Expressions of The Rust Reference says something similar with more details.

Thus, the raw answer about the difference between the third and fourth attempts simply stands in the fact that the field reference of the third attempt is considered as a place expression.

However, I don't find this answer very satisfying since I don't know the motivation of the language designers in this choice. Why do they consider a temporary as a value expression but consider a field of this temporary as a place expression?

struct X {
    a: u8,
}
fn main() {
    let mut _x = X { a: 1 };
    _x = X { a: 11 };

    X { a: 2 }; // created, then dropped straight away

    X { a: 3 }.a = 33; // created, altered, then dropped straight away

    // X { a: 4 } = X { a: 44 }; // fails with error E0070
}
1
  • Now I understand the language rules behind this, thanks. The motivation of the language designers is curious, and probably deserves a Q&A of its own.
    – nicolai
    Commented Jun 18, 2022 at 9:22

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