0

Why this command is working like "Self.Close" or like that?

First, I think that was like this:

MyHelloVar. {spaces...} Close;

or be:

Command 1: MyHelloVar. // but this wont compile it, or yes?

Command 2: {Self.} Close;

The "MyHelloVar" itself is behaving as if she were my variable (instance) of the main form.

Is it true what I'm understanding here?

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows,
  Winapi.Messages,
  System.SysUtils,
  System.Variants,
  System.Classes,
  Vcl.Graphics,
  Vcl.Controls,
  Vcl.Forms,
  Vcl.Dialogs,
  Vcl.StdCtrls;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}
(* Summary:
  - RAD Studio 11.1 Alexandria
  - VCL Project 32bits (common case)
  - 1 form = my main form created automatically by IDE
  - 1 form = my second form not created automatically
  - 1 button to test!
*)

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  MyHelloVar: TForm;
begin
  // That's crazy behaviour!
  //
  MyHelloVar.Close; // this is close my "App" like "Self.Close" do it!
  //
end;

end.
2
  • 2
    Local variables of unmanaged types (like class types, like TForm) are uninitialized, so you are calling TForm.Close on a random pointer (whatever happens to be in your computer's RAM at that place). Then anything can happen. Different things can happen every time you run the code. This is a bug. Jun 22 at 14:32
  • Interessant!!! I never had this case before!
    – emailx45
    Jun 22 at 14:34

1 Answer 1

1

Using Delphi 7

The last thing that was used in memory was the variable Form1. In your event handler method you just use the same datatype (that is TForm) for the last used memory - that's the only reason why it works: same data structure for the same position in memory.

It also works by adding more forms and using the same code there - the MyHelloVar variable will then point to Form2, Form3 and so on (which can be easily debugged by evaluating the variable's property .Name, using Run > Evaluate/Modify). So, yes: it appears to work like self.

However, as soon as you use more variables in that method the fantasy world will break apart, f.e.:

var
  one, two,
  MyHelloVar: TForm;
begin
  self.Caption:= one.Caption+ two.Caption;
  MyHelloVar.Close();
end;

If you now evaluate one and two (and finally MyHelloVar) you'll see much different content and executing it will most likely crash your program. I also don't know why you ignore the compiler warnings which clearly tell you:

[Warning] Unit1.pas(35) Variable 'one' might not have been initialized
[Warning] Unit1.pas(35) Variable 'two' might not have been initialized
[Warning] Unit1.pas(36) Variable 'MyHelloVar' might not have been initialized

It's not magic, just coincidence. Which you cannot rely on. I was able to reproduce this using Delphi 7, compiling a 32 bit executable under Win7x64.

Using FPC/Lazarus

Lazarus 2.2.0 using FPC 3.2.2 will show the same compiler warning:

unit1.pas(36,3) Warning: Local variable "MyHelloVar" does not seem to be initialized

...and evaluating that variable will already show it's pointing to a very different memory - as a result the program crashes at that point. This time it's also a 64 bit executable. So your magic trick won't even work with that compiler. Or platform.

1
  • > I also don't know why you ignore the compiler warnings which clearly tell you:.... I not ignoring nothing in question! I just never faced this case! using: Integer(Pointer(Self)) and Integer(Pointer(MyHelloVar)) it's possible see the same address used, BUT in my test I really didnt think that the code would valid at all. I would wait a logical "Access Violation"! for this, it's right. It's a randomic in action ;)))
    – emailx45
    Jun 23 at 15:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.