1

As an exercise I want to prove that there is always exists a maximum element in a non-empty sequence.

Theorem largest_el_in_list (s: seq rat) x : x \in s -> exists y, y \in s /\ forall z, z \in s -> y >= z.

My idea was to go by induction on s, and then to destruct x. The largest element in this first case is the only element in the list. However, in the second case I'm getting quite confused. Am I supposed to use the inductive hypothesis? My idea was that we can get rid of the existential by exists max a a1, where a is the maximal element we found in the previous step, and a1 is the new element being added to the sequence. But if I do this, then I can't use the inductive hypothesis and I get completely stuck.

I've been stuck for hours and would love to know if I have the right idea.

Edit: Here is the proof so far, with the current proof state below:

Theorem largest_el_in_list (s: seq rat) x : x \in s -> exists y, y \in s /\ forall z, z \in s -> y >= z.
Proof.
  elim/last_ind : s => //= s x0 IH x_in_rcons.
  case : s IH x_in_rcons.
  move => _ x_in_sx0.
  exists x0. split.
  rewrite in_cons. apply/orP. left. by apply/eqP.
  rewrite in_cons in x_in_sx0. case/orP : x_in_sx0 => //= xeqx0 z z_in_sx0.
  rewrite in_cons in z_in_sx0. case/orP : z_in_sx0 => //= zeqx0. case/eqP : zeqx0 => zeqx0.
  by rewrite zeqx0.
  move => a l IH x_in_rcons. 
  exists (maxr x0 a). split.
  have [agex0 | x0gta] := (lerP x0 a).
  by rewrite mem_head.
  rewrite rcons_cons in_cons. apply/orP. right. by rewrite in_rcons.
  move => z z_in_rcons.
Admitted.

Proof state:

x: rat_eqType
x0, a: rat
l: seq rat
IH: x \in a :: l ->
     exists y : rat, y \in a :: l /\ (forall z : rat, z \in a :: l -> z <= y)
x_in_rcons: x \in rcons (a :: l) x0
z: rat
z_in_rcons: z \in rcons (a :: l) x0
-------------------------------
(1/1)
z <= maxr x0 a

ANOTHER EDIT:

Imports:

From finprob Require Import prob.
From mathcomp Require Import all_ssreflect all_algebra seq.
From extructures Require Import ord fset fmap ffun.
Import Num.Theory.
Import GRing. 
Import Bool. 
Import Num.Def.

You can find extructures here https://github.com/arthuraa/extructures And finprob here https://github.com/arthuraa/finprob


UPDATE:

Although changing the definition clears the path, there is still an issue. Here is the updated proof and proof state:

Theorem largest_el_in_list (s: seq rat) : s != [::] -> exists y, y \in s /\ forall z, z \in s -> y >= z.
Proof.
  elim/last_ind : s => //= s x0 IH x_in_rcons.
  case : s IH x_in_rcons.
  move => _ x_in_sx0.
  exists x0. split.
  rewrite in_cons. apply/orP. left. by apply/eqP.

  move => z z_in_cons.
  rewrite in_cons in z_in_cons.
  case/orP : z_in_cons => //= zeqx0.
  case/eqP : zeqx0 => zeqx0. by rewrite zeqx0.
  
  move => a l IH cons_nempty.
  case IH => //= x [x_in_cons IH'].
  exists x.
  split.
  rewrite in_cons in x_in_cons.
  rewrite in_cons. 
  case/orP : x_in_cons => [xeqa | x_in_l].
  by rewrite xeqa orTb. apply/orP. right. rewrite in_rcons. apply/orP. by right.
  move => z z_in_cons.
  apply IH'.
  rewrite in_cons. rewrite in_cons in z_in_cons.
  case/orP : z_in_cons => [zeqa | z_in_cons].
  by rewrite zeqa orTb.
Admitted.
x0, a: rat
l: seq rat
IH: a :: l != [::] ->
     exists y : rat, y \in a :: l /\ (forall z : rat, z \in a :: l -> z <= y)
cons_nempty: rcons (a :: l) x0 != [::]
x: rat
x_in_cons: x \in a :: l
IH': forall z : rat, z \in a :: l -> z <= x
z: rat
z_in_cons: z \in rcons l x0
-------------------------
(1/1)
(z == a) || (z \in l)

I don't see how this can be true, because we know from z_in_cons that z is either equal to x0, or it is in l. Thus, if we go by cases, the first case is impossible because we are lacking some information about x0.

5
  • Can you show a full accounting, including imports, of how far along you are when you get stuck?
    – jbapple
    Jun 23 at 1:37
  • Yes, just added above. At this point I would think it is necessary to use IH, but the precondition x \in a :: l seems to cause issues. I also tried to do it without IH, and hit a dead end everytime, because I end up having to show that z < x0 or a with no information.
    – dvr
    Jun 23 at 2:31
  • What imports do you use?
    – jbapple
    Jun 23 at 2:35
  • Posted - I think the important one is just math comp
    – dvr
    Jun 23 at 2:41
  • You should not need extructures or finprob for this.
    – dvr
    Jun 23 at 2:41

2 Answers 2

1

Another approach would be to explicitly provide, right from the start, a value for y, the existence of which you are looking for. This should be the maximum of the list, which you could either specify yourself, via a Fixpoint definition, or be the maximum as defined in Coq.

But if you want to keep the proof by induction, as you suggest in your comment, here is one way (I suppose one can write it in a more concise manner). I'm using here nat instead of rat, for convenience:

Theorem largest_el_in_list (s: seq nat) : 
  s != [::] -> exists y, y \in s /\ forall z, z \in s -> y >= z.
Proof.
elim: s => [//=|n s IH _].
have [/eqP ->|/IH [max [maxins ismax]]] := boolP (s == nil).
- exists n.
  split=> [|y]; first by rewrite in_cons eq_refl orTb.
  by rewrite in_cons ?in_nil => /orP [/eqP ->|].
- have [lenx|] := boolP (n <= max).
  - exists max. 
    split=> [|z]; first by rewrite in_cons maxins orbT.
    by rewrite in_cons => /orP [/eqP ->|/ismax]. 
  - rewrite -ltnNge.
    exists n.
    split=> [|z]; first by rewrite in_cons eq_refl orTb.
    rewrite in_cons => /orP [/eqP -> //|/ismax ltzx].
    by rewrite (@leq_trans max) // ltnW.
Qed.
4
  • Yes, I think this would certainly work, but I would like to do it this way. Perhaps I am losing some information somewhere in the inductive step - which makes the last subgoal difficult to prove.
    – dvr
    Jun 23 at 16:55
  • See updated answer. Jun 23 at 20:46
  • Thank you, Pierre! I am curious if you have an explanation as to why doing the case analysis on s after induction makes the difference. You are basically doing the same thing with boolP(s == nil), no?
    – dvr
    Jun 23 at 21:31
  • 1
    You need to ensure that the list s is not empty if you want to use IH on s in the induction case. I used a case analysis to ensure that, and of couse deal with the other branch, when s is empty. I'm not a big fan of seeing exists n twice, though, so this could maybe be cleaned up, if needed. Jun 24 at 8:55
1

May be the issue comes from the variable x.

A possible fix is to have x universally quantified, e.g. by starting the proof with a move: x (before the induction on s).

Another solution would be to remove x, which occurs only once in your statement and makes the subgoals hard to read, and prove instead:

Theorem largest_el_in_list (s: seq rat)  : s <> nil  ->
          exists y, y \in s /\ forall z, z \in s -> y >= z.
5
  • Yes, oddly enough it seems that proving there is an element in s is the problem. Thank you.
    – dvr
    Jun 23 at 16:36
  • Actually, can you take a look at the update - it seems that there is another problem.
    – dvr
    Jun 23 at 16:51
  • Perhaps I am losing some information somewhere?
    – dvr
    Jun 23 at 16:52
  • 1
    Hi, In your update, you seem to mix an induction using rcons with a case analysis using cons. It would be simpler to work in a consistent direction. Jun 24 at 17:36
  • 1
    You should try to start your proof with a "normal" induction (not last_ind). Or else, use tactics and lemmas about rcons Jun 24 at 19:02

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