98

I have the following code:

MatchCollection matches = myRegEx.Matches(content);

bool result = (from Match m in matches
               where m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128
               select m).Any();

Is there a way to do this using the LINQ extension method syntax?

Something like this:

bool result = matches.Any(x => ... );
203
using System.Linq;

matches.Cast<Match>().Any(x => x.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128)

You just need to convert it from an IEnumerable to an IEnumerable<Match> (IEnumerable<T>) to get access to the LINQ extension provided on IEnumerable<T>.

3
  • 1
    This works, just make sure you are using System.Linq else it will give a syntax error – Ash Berlin-Taylor Sep 9 '11 at 10:30
  • 1
    Thank you, to anyone confused, Cast is not needed since C# 8.0, but the code won't compile in earlier language versions if it is not provided. – rvnlord Aug 23 '20 at 14:27
  • I found if i upgraded the project to NetStandard2.1 match.Any() worked. – Brent Jan 22 at 2:24
47

When you specify an explicit range variable type, the compiler inserts a call to Cast<T>. So this:

bool result = (from Match m in matches
               where m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128
               select m).Any();

is exactly equivalent to:

bool result = matches.Cast<Match>()
                     .Where(m => m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128)
                     .Any();

which can also be written as:

bool result = matches.Cast<Match>()
                     .Any(m => m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128);

In this case the Cast call is required because MatchCollection only implements ICollection and IEnumerable, not IEnumerable<T>. Almost all the LINQ to Objects extension methods are targeted at IEnumerable<T>, with the notable exceptions of Cast and OfType, both of which are used to convert a "weakly" typed collection (such as MatchCollection) into a generic IEnumerable<T> - which then allows for further LINQ operations.

1
8

Try this:

var matches = myRegEx.Matches(content).Cast<Match>();

For reference, please see Enumerable.Cast:

Converts the elements of an IEnumerable to the specified type.

Basically it's one way of turning an IEnumerable into an IEnumerable<T>.

0
3

I think it would be something like this:

bool result = matches.Cast<Match>().Any(m => m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128);
1
  • 1
    No. The whole point is that MatchCollection only implements IEnumerable. It is not strongly-typed. – jason Sep 1 '11 at 18:01
2

You can try something like this:

List<Match> matchList = matches.Cast<Match>().Where(m => m.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128).ToList();
-1

EDIT:

 public static IEnumerable<T> AsEnumerable<T>(this IEnumerable enumerable)
 {
      foreach(object item in enumerable)
          yield return (T)item;
 }

Then you should be able to call this extension method to turn it into an IEnumerable:

 matches.AsEnumerable<Match>().Any(x => x.Groups["name"].Value.Length > 128);
4
  • This is better than mine, I didn't remember that Any took a predicate. – pstrjds Sep 1 '11 at 18:00
  • No. The whole point is that MatchCollection only implements IEnumerable. It is not strongly-typed. – jason Sep 1 '11 at 18:00
  • @Jason except that it is Castable to an IEnumberable<T> via IEnumberable.Cast<T> – msarchet Sep 1 '11 at 18:03
  • @msarchet: Yes, I know, which is why I upvoted your answer. This answer, before the edit, wouldn't have even compiled. – jason Sep 1 '11 at 18:04

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