5
def alarm_clock(day, vacation):
    if day == 0 or day == 6 and vacation != True:
        return "10.00"
    else: 
        return "off"

print(alarm_clock(0, True))

Why does this return "10.00"? In my mind it should return "off". Yes, day is equal to 0, but vacation is True, and the IF-statements first line states that it should only be executed if vacation is not True.

1

2 Answers 2

17

In Python and binds tighter than or. So your statement is equivalent to this:

if day == 0 or (day == 6 and vacation != True):

To get the correct result you must parenthesize the precedence yourself:

if (day == 0 or day == 6) and vacation != True:
3
  • THANKS! It works with parenthesis if (day == 0 or day == 6) and vacation != True:
    – Marty
    Jun 26 at 19:44
  • 6
    Wouldn't it be better to use something like if day in (0, 6) and not vacation:? It looks pretty more clear to read, IMHO.
    – accdias
    Jun 26 at 19:45
  • 6
    @accdias I would definitely agree with not vacation. The in statement is arguable but fine either way. However for didactical purposes I only wanted to focus on the immediate problem and solution without bringing in a full code review.
    – orlp
    Jun 26 at 19:46
0

What you probably want is this:

def alarm_clock(day, vacation):
    if (day == 0 or day == 6) and vacation != True:
        return "10.00"
    else: 
        return "off"

print(alarm_clock(0, True))

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