-1

here is my problem. I got a list of lists like this:

[
[1, 1, 1, 18, 35, 35, 70, 133, 280],
[1, 1, 1, 53, 90, 101, 130, 148, 178],
[1, 1, 1, 18, 35, 133, 133, 164],
[1, 1, 1, 18, 101, 108],
[1, 1, 18, 36, 86, 118, 126]
]

The list can have up to 9 items, and all the sublists contain at least 5 items. I need to find the median for every number at the nth position per each list, ignoring lists too short (otherwise I would be out of index).

I tried d = [item[i] for item in c], but it fails for i > 5 (when the lists start to have a different length). Any idea how to solve the problem?

The output for the solution in the example should be:

[median_numbers_1st_position, 
median_numbers_2nd_position,
median_numbers_3rd_position,
median_numbers_4th_position,
median_numbers_5th_position,
median_numbers_6th_position,
median_numbers_7th_position,
median_numbers_8th_position,
median_numbers_9th_position
]

Thanks a lot for the help!

6
  • 2
    I'm not sure I understand what you mean about the "nth position" and "lists too short". What's your desired output? Please edit to clarify. And in the code you tried, what is i exactly? for i in range(5)? Please provide a minimal reproducible example.
    – wjandrea
    Jun 27 at 20:14
  • 2
    Did you mean you want the median of each "column" of your "ragged array"? Jun 27 at 20:26
  • 1
    if you want to calculate medians of columns, you can do it with itertools zip_longest and numpy [np.median(i) for i in [[k for k in j if k is not None] for j in itertools.zip_longest(*lst)]] output: [1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 18.0, 86.0, 108.0, 128.0, 148.0, 229.0]
    – Nin17
    Jun 27 at 20:43
  • I added info with a sample of the solution
    – ianux22
    Jun 27 at 21:20
  • 1
    @ianux22 see my comment above
    – Nin17
    Jun 27 at 21:25

1 Answer 1

-1

Without the overhead of numpy you could do this:

values = [
    [1, 1, 1, 18, 35, 35, 70, 133, 280],
    [1, 1, 1, 53, 90, 101, 130, 148, 178],
    [1, 1, 1, 18, 35, 133, 133, 164],
    [1, 1, 1, 18, 101, 108],
    [1, 1, 18, 36, 86, 118, 126]
]


def median(list_):
    m = len(list_) // 2
    list_ = sorted(list_) # to ensure compatibility with numpy.median
    if len(list_) % 2 == 0:
        return sum(list_[m-1:m+1]) / 2
    else:
        return float(list_[m])


for e in values:
    print(median(e))

Output:

35
90
26.5
9.5
36
4
  • 2
    assuming the input is sorted
    – Nin17
    Jun 27 at 20:15
  • @Nin17 Arithmetic Median is a positional average and refers to the middle value in a distribution. Therefore the median value has no bearing on whether (or not) the list is sorted
    – Stuart
    Jun 27 at 20:17
  • 2
    @AlbertWinestein I wouldn't be so sure about that en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Median#Finite_data_set_of_numbers for instance with [1,2,4,3,5] this gives 4
    – Nin17
    Jun 27 at 20:19
  • I inserted an output of the solution
    – ianux22
    Jun 27 at 21:22

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