8

I am attempting to find duplicate rows in a numpy array. The following code replicates the structure of my array which has n rows, m columns, and nz non-zero entries per row:

import numpy as np
import random
import datetime


def create_mat(n, m, nz):
    sample_mat = np.zeros((n, m), dtype='uint8')
    random.seed(42)
    for row in range(0, n):
        counter = 0
        while counter < nz:
            random_col = random.randrange(0, m-1, 1)
            if sample_mat[row, random_col] == 0:
                sample_mat[row, random_col] = 1
                counter += 1
    test = np.all(np.sum(sample_mat, axis=1) == nz)
    print(f'All rows have {nz} elements: {test}')
    return sample_mat

The code I am attempting to optimize is as follows:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    threshold = 2
    mat = create_mat(1800000, 108, 8)

    print(f'Time: {datetime.datetime.now()}')
    unique_rows, _, duplicate_counts = np.unique(mat, axis=0, return_counts=True, return_index=True)
    duplicate_indices = [int(x) for x in np.argwhere(duplicate_counts >= threshold)]
    print(f'Time: {datetime.datetime.now()}')

    print(f'Unique rows: {len(unique_rows)} Sample inds: {duplicate_indices[0:5]} Sample counts: {duplicate_counts[0:5]}')
    print(f'Sample rows:')
    print(unique_rows[0:5])

My output is as follows:

All rows have 8 elements: True
Time: 2022-06-29 12:08:07.320834
Time: 2022-06-29 12:08:23.281633
Unique rows: 1799994 Sample inds: [508991, 553136, 930379, 1128637, 1290356] Sample counts: [1 1 1 1 1]
Sample rows:
[[0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0]]

I have considered using numba, but the challenge is that it does not operate using an axis parameter. Similarly, conversion to list and utilization of sets is an option, but then looping through to perform the duplicate counts seems "unpythonic".

Given that I need to run this code multiple times (since I am modifying the numpy array and then needing to re-search for duplicates), the time is critical. I have also tried to use multiprocessing against this step but the np.unique seems to be blocking (i.e. even when I try to run multiple versions of this, I end up constrained to one thread running at 6% CPU capacity while the other threads sit idle).

10
  • 1
    unique_indices contains the non unique indices with the example code and can be written as np.argwhere(unique_counts >= threshold).ravel(). Jun 29, 2022 at 17:20
  • 1
    I can't reproduce the multiprocessing behaviour. Multiprocessing the same array exhausts all available cores, np.unique is single threaded. However, the speedup is only ~40%. Jun 29, 2022 at 18:26
  • 4
    unique when given an axis, creates a structured array view, which encapsulates each 'row' as a record It then does a unique1d, which depends heavily on sorting. In effect it sorts the 'rows' (as immutable units), and removes adjacent duplicates.
    – hpaulj
    Jun 29, 2022 at 18:50
  • 1
    Using @hpaulj's insight and reducing the number of columns to sort with bitpacking, np.unique can be accelerated. But this only works if the number of columns is a multiple of an unsigned integer type. Notebook Jun 29, 2022 at 21:30
  • 1
    @Ali_Sh - The numba implementation works but is 15% slower than np.unique for this example. Jun 30, 2022 at 8:43

4 Answers 4

7
+100

Step 1: bit packing

Since your matrix only contains binary values, you can aggressively pack the bits into uint64 values so to perform a much more efficient sort then. Here is a Numba implementation:

import numpy as np
import numba as nb

@nb.njit('(uint8[:,::1],)', parallel=True)
def pack_bits(mat):
    n, m = mat.shape
    res = np.zeros((n, (m+63)//64), np.uint64)
    for i in nb.prange(n):
        for bj in range(0, m, 64):
            val = np.uint64(0)
            if bj + 64 <= m:
                # Fast case
                for j in range(64):
                    val += np.uint64(mat[i, bj+j]) << (63 - j)
            else:
                # Slow case (boundary)
                for j in range(m - bj):
                    val += np.uint64(mat[i, bj+j]) << (63 - j)
            res[i, bj//64] = val
    return res

@nb.njit('(uint64[:,::1], int_)', parallel=True)
def unpack_bits(mat, m):
    n = mat.shape[0]
    assert mat.shape[1] == (m+63)//64
    res = np.zeros((n, m), np.uint64)
    for i in nb.prange(n):
        for bj in range(0, m, 64):
            val = np.uint64(mat[i, bj//64])
            if bj + 64 <= m:
                # Fast case
                for j in range(64):
                    res[i, bj+j] = np.uint8((val >> (63 - j)) & 1)
            else:
                # Slow case (boundary)
                for j in range(m - bj):
                    res[i, bj+j] = np.uint8((val >> (63 - j)) & 1)
    return res

The np.unique function can be called on the much smaller packed array like in the initial code (except the resulting sorted array is a packed one and need to be unpacked). Since you do not need the indices, it is better not to compute it. Thus, return_index=True can be removed. Additionally, only the required values can be unpacked (unpacking is a bit more expensive than packing because writing a big matrix is more expensive than reading an existing one).

if __name__ == '__main__':
    threshold = 2
    n, m = 1800000, 108
    mat = create_mat(n, m, 8)

    print(f'Time: {datetime.datetime.now()}')
    packed_mat = pack_bits(mat)
    duplicate_packed_rows, duplicate_counts = np.unique(packed_mat, axis=0, return_counts=True)
    duplicate_indices = [int(x) for x in np.argwhere(duplicate_counts >= threshold)]
    print(f'Time: {datetime.datetime.now()}')

    print(f'Duplicate rows: {len(duplicate_rows)} Sample inds: {duplicate_indices[0:5]} Sample counts: {duplicate_counts[0:5]}')
    print(f'Sample rows:')
    print(unpack_bits(duplicate_packed_rows[0:5], m))

Step 2: np.unique optimizations

The np.unique call is sub-optimal as it performs multiple expensive internal sorting steps. Not all of them are needed in your specific case and some step can be optimized.

A more efficient implementation consists in sorting the last column during a first step, then sorting the previous column, and so on until the first column is sorted similar to what a Radix sort does. Note that the last column can be sorted using a non-stable algorithm (generally faster) but the others need a stable one. This method is still sub-optimal as argsort calls are slow and the current implementation does not use multiple threads yet. Unfortunately, Numpy does not proving any efficient way to sort rows of a 2D array yet. While it is possible to reimplement this in Numba, this is cumbersome, a bit tricky to do and bug prone. Not to mention Numba introduce some overheads compared to a native C/C++ code. Once sorted, the unique/duplicate rows can be tracked and counted. Here is an implementation:

def sort_lines(mat):
    n, m = mat.shape

    for i in range(m):
        kind = 'stable' if i > 0 else None
        mat = mat[np.argsort(mat[:,m-1-i], kind=kind)]

    return mat

@nb.njit('(uint64[:,::1],)', parallel=True)
def find_duplicates(sorted_mat):
    n, m = sorted_mat.shape
    assert m >= 0

    isUnique = np.zeros(n, np.bool_)
    uniqueCount = 1
    if n > 0:
        isUnique[0] = True
    for i in nb.prange(1, n):
        isUniqueVal = False
        for j in range(m):
            isUniqueVal |= sorted_mat[i, j] != sorted_mat[i-1, j]
        isUnique[i] = isUniqueVal
        uniqueCount += isUniqueVal

    uniqueValues = np.empty((uniqueCount, m), np.uint64)
    duplicateCounts = np.zeros(len(uniqueValues), np.uint64)

    cursor = 0
    for i in range(n):
        cursor += isUnique[i]
        for j in range(m):
            uniqueValues[cursor-1, j] = sorted_mat[i, j]
        duplicateCounts[cursor-1] += 1

    return uniqueValues, duplicateCounts

The previous np.unique call can be replaced by find_duplicates(sort_lines(packed_mat)).

Step 3: GPU-based np.unique

While implementing a fast algorithm to sort row is not easy on CPU with Numba and Numpy, one can simply use CuPy to do that on the GPU assuming a Nvidia GPU is available and CUDA is installed (as well as CuPy). This solution has the benefit of being simple and significantly more efficient. Here is an example:

import cupy as cp

def cupy_sort_lines(mat):
    cupy_mat = cp.array(mat)
    return cupy_mat[cp.lexsort(cupy_mat.T[::-1,:])].get()

The previous sort_lines call can be replaced by cupy_sort_lines.


Results

Here are the timings on my machine with a 6-core i5-9600KF CPU and a Nvidia 1660 Super GPU:

Initial version:        15.541 s
Optimized packing:       0.982 s
Optimized np.unique:     0.634 s
GPU-based sorting:       0.143 s   (require a Nvidia GPU)

Thus, the CPU-based optimized version is about 25 times faster and the GPU-based one is 109 times faster. Note that the sort take a significant time in all versions. Also, please note that the unpacking is not included in the benchmark (as seen in the provided code). It takes a negligible time as long as only few rows are unpacked and not all the full array (which takes roughtly ~200 ms on my machine). This last operation can be further optimized at the expense of a significantly more complex implementation.

0
2

Just to share a naive solution as a baseline:

version 1:

def get_duplicate_indexes(data):
    signature_to_indexes = {}

    index = 0
    for row in data:
        key = row.data.tobytes()
        if key not in signature_to_indexes:
            signature_to_indexes[key] = [index]
        else:
            signature_to_indexes[key].append(index)
        index = index + 1

    return [
        indexes
        for indexes in signature_to_indexes.values()
        if len(indexes) > 1
    ]

In [122]: %timeit get_duplicate_indexes(mat)
833 ms ± 5.94 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

In [125]: %time get_duplicate_indexes(mat)
CPU times: user 1.5 s, sys: 87.1 ms, total: 1.59 s
Wall time: 1.59 s

In [123]: get_duplicate_indexes(mat)
Out[123]:
[[1396, 402980],
 [769782, 1421364],
 [875866, 1476693],
 [892483, 1194500],
 [1230863, 1478688],
 [1311189, 1426136]]

version 2 (after discussing with @Kelly Bundy):

def get_duplicate_indexes(data):
    signature_to_indexes = {}
    duplicates = {}

    for index, row in enumerate(data):
        key = row.data.tobytes()
        if key not in signature_to_indexes:
            signature_to_indexes[key] = index
        else:
            indexes = signature_to_indexes[key]
            if isinstance(indexes, int):
                duplicates[key] = signature_to_indexes[key] = [indexes, index]
            else:
                indexes.append(index)
    return list(duplicates.values())

In [146]: %timeit get_duplicate_indexes(mat)
672 ms ± 3.67 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

In [147]: %time get_duplicate_indexes(mat)
CPU times: user 652 ms, sys: 46.6 ms, total: 699 ms
Wall time: 698 ms

JFYI: initial version took ~14s on my machine.

6
  • Hmm, why is %time so much larger than %timeit? And which one gave the ~14s? Jul 3, 2022 at 14:47
  • 14s is about the initial version of the topic starter. Re: time vs timeit: I believe this is a topic for another discussion :) but my bet is timeit disables gc Jul 3, 2022 at 14:50
  • I understood it's about the OP's. But do I need to compare those 14s with your 0.8s or with your 1.6 seconds? Jul 3, 2022 at 14:52
  • 2
    Could very well be gc, yes. In this case, the gc activity is very much caused by the relevant code itself (by the many lists), so I'd say it should be included. Alternatively, we could at first only store the index itself, and only create lists for actual duplicates. Would likely speed it up further (not just because of less gc activity). Jul 3, 2022 at 14:59
  • Using enumerate would also be better. Jul 3, 2022 at 15:02
1

If you don't want to use bit packing or calling np.unique on multidimensional array you could also create view. It's slower than any other optimized ways but rather educational:

def create_view(arr): # a, b are arrays
    arr = np.ascontiguousarray(arr)
    void_dt = np.dtype((np.void, arr.dtype.itemsize * arr.shape[1]))
    return arr.view(void_dt).ravel()

def create_mat(n, m, nz):
    rng = np.random.default_rng()
    data = rng.permuted(np.full((n, m), [1] * nz + [0] * (m - nz), dtype=np.uint8), axis=1)
    return data

if __name__ == '__main__':
    mat = create_mat(1800000, 108, 8)
    mat_view = create_view(mat)
    u, idx, counts = np.unique(mat_view, axis=0, return_index=True, return_counts=True)
    duplicate_indices = np.flatnonzero(counts >= 2)

    print(f'Duplicate inds: {duplicate_indices}')
    print(f'Duplicate counts: {counts[duplicate_indices]}')
    print(f'Unique rows: {len(u)}')

Note that I have fixed some code as well. create_mat could be done in a more efficient way. Runtime is ~ 3 seconds :)

0

I would suggest scipy.stats.rankdata, with your favorite axis as axis. Notice that with method set to min, the unique values in the resulting arrays give you the indices of the unique rows.

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