3

I would like to transform

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<mydoc>
    <file>
        <colors>
            <blue />
            <red />
            <green />
        </colors>
        <secret>
            <username />
            <password />
        </secret>
    </file>
</mydoc>

into

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<colors>
  <blue />
  <red />
</colors>

In plain english, I would like to copy the colors element recursively, including text, ignore the rest of the XML document and discard the green element.

There are solutions working with the example above but will fail if the XML varies even slightly. For instance by adding the nest element under the color element, or the other element which is not in the hierarchy of the color element, or text that is in the scope of the color element ( GOOD TEXT ) and another that is outside its scope ( BAD TEXT ).

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<mydoc>
    <file>
        <colors>
            <nest>
              <blue />
              <red />
              <green />
            </nest>
            GOOD TEXT
        </colors>
        <secret>
            <username />
            <password />
        </secret>
        BAD TEXT
    </file>
    <other>BAD TEXT TWO</other>
</mydoc>

I am most interested in a solution that is generic and not customized to the exemples presented here.

0
2

This new transform is general enough to copy colors elements whatever their parent is.

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output indent="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:template match="/mydoc/file/colors">
        <xsl:variable name="colors_parent"
            select="local-name(.//green/parent::*)"/>
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:copy-of 
                select=".//*[local-name()=$colors_parent]/*[not(self::green)]"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="text()"/>

</xsl:stylesheet>

I've also excluded all possible text elements. It's not still clear if you want to keep the "GOOD TEXT" text node. However it should be very easy for you now to adapt the transform to new requirements. For example if you want to keep any text node under colors element you can change use this transform:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output indent="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:template match="/mydoc/file/colors">
        <xsl:variable name="colors_parent"
            select="local-name(.//green/parent::*)"/>
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:copy-of 
                select=".//*[local-name()=$colors_parent]/*[not(self::green)]
                      | .//text()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="text()"/>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Usage of identity rule (it copies the nest element)

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output indent="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="mydoc">
        <xsl:apply-templates select="file/colors"/>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="green"/>

</xsl:stylesheet>
2
  • 1
    I tried to apply the solution to a real world example but it failed. I summarized the problem I found in an update of the problem, with a second example that include slight variations. Your second solution is more robust and succeeds. Thanks a lot. – Loic Dachary Sep 4 '11 at 14:40
  • I've updated the first solution and left the one with the identity rule as it was the accepted one. – Emiliano Poggi Sep 4 '11 at 14:58
1
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="no"/>

    <xsl:template match="/">
        <colors>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="//colors/*[not(self::green)]"/>
        </colors>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="*">
        <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Output:

<colors>
    <blue />
    <red />
</colors>
1
  • 1
    While it works with the first example, it is not generic enough to match the second example. Can you think of a more generic solution ? – Loic Dachary Sep 4 '11 at 14:30

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