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I am writing a "freelist allocator". I started with a line of memset in the initialization phase for debugging purposes. Later I removed the memset. But I found that the allocation part in the testing function test1_managed is running 3-4 times faster with the memset in the initialization than the one without. I am confused with the result. What reason could it be?

I compiled the code in Visual Studio 2019 (in Release mode) with MSVC 19.29.30140 and "/O2" optimization enabled.

Here is the code:

#pragma once
#include <cstdio>
#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

using namespace std;
using namespace chrono;

const uint64_t MemSize = 1 << 20;
const uint64_t TestSize = 1 << 12;
typedef int TestType;

struct MemSegInfo {
    MemSegInfo* m_next{ 0 };
    MemSegInfo* m_nextFree{ 0 };
    uint64_t m_size{ 0 };
    uint64_t m_handle{ 0 };
};
const uint64_t infoSize = sizeof(MemSegInfo);
const uint64_t ptrSize = sizeof(MemSegInfo*);
const uint64_t maxAlignment = 16;

char* m_dataBuffer{ 0 };
char* m_dataBufferEnd{ 0 };
MemSegInfo* m_head;

MemSegInfo m_segFree;
MemSegInfo* m_segFreeCursor;

inline void* OffsetFromMemSegInfo(MemSegInfo* seg) {
    return ((char*)seg) + infoSize;
}
inline MemSegInfo* OffsetToMemSegInfo(void* ptr) {
    return (MemSegInfo*)(((char*)ptr) - infoSize);
}

template<class T>
inline void SetMem(MemSegInfo* seg, T&& val) {
    *((T*)OffsetFromMemSegInfo(seg)) = val;
}
template<class T>
inline void SetMem(MemSegInfo* seg, const T& val) {
    *((T*)OffsetFromMemSegInfo(seg)) = val;
}
template<class T>
inline T GetMem(MemSegInfo* seg) {
    return *((T*)OffsetFromMemSegInfo(seg));
}

void Init() {
    m_dataBuffer = (char*)malloc(MemSize);
    if (!m_dataBuffer)
        throw "Out of mem! ";
    m_dataBufferEnd = m_dataBuffer + MemSize;

    m_head = (MemSegInfo*)m_dataBuffer;
    m_head->m_next = m_head;
    //m_head->m_last = m_head;
    m_head->m_size = MemSize - infoSize;
    m_head->m_nextFree = &m_segFree;

    m_segFree.m_size = 0;
    m_segFree.m_nextFree = m_head;

    m_segFreeCursor = &m_segFree;

    /***THE MEMSET I AM TALKING ABOUT***/
    memset(OffsetFromMemSegInfo(m_head), 0xfafafafa, m_head->m_size);
}

MemSegInfo* Allocate(size_t size) {
    const uint64_t sizeAligned = ((size - 1) / maxAlignment + 1) * maxAlignment;
    const uint64_t sizeAlloc = sizeAligned + infoSize;
    MemSegInfo* segCurPrev = m_segFreeCursor;
    while (segCurPrev->m_nextFree->m_size < sizeAlloc) { // Go through freelist to find the First Fit. 
        segCurPrev = segCurPrev->m_nextFree;
        if (segCurPrev == m_segFreeCursor)
            throw "Out of mem! ";
    }
    MemSegInfo* const segCur = segCurPrev->m_nextFree;
    const uint64_t sizeRest = segCur->m_size - sizeAligned;
    if (sizeRest <= infoSize) { // There is not enough space for another seg. Just gonna use it. 
        segCurPrev->m_nextFree = segCur->m_nextFree; // This can also deal with the case where this is the last one available. 
        m_segFreeCursor = segCurPrev;
    }
    else { // There is enough space for another seg. Separate and make a new seg. 
        MemSegInfo* const segNew = (MemSegInfo*)(((char*)segCur) + sizeAlloc);
        MemSegInfo* const segNext = segCur->m_next;
        MemSegInfo* const segNextFree = segCur->m_nextFree;

        // Rearrange seg list
        //segNew->m_last = segCur;
        //segNext->m_last = segNew;
        segNew->m_next = segNext;
        segCur->m_next = segNew;
        segNew->m_size = sizeRest - infoSize;
        segCur->m_size = sizeAligned;
        segCur->m_nextFree = nullptr;

        // Join freelist
        segNew->m_nextFree = segNextFree;
        segCurPrev->m_nextFree = segNew;
        m_segFreeCursor = segCurPrev;
    }
    return segCur;
}

inline void Free(MemSegInfo* segFree) {
    // Join the freelist
    segFree->m_nextFree = m_segFree.m_nextFree;
    m_segFree.m_nextFree = segFree->m_nextFree;
}

void Cleanup() {
    free(m_dataBuffer);
}

MemSegInfo* mems[16];

struct MyStruct
{
    uint64_t m_a;
    uint64_t m_b;
    uint32_t m_c;
    uint32_t m_d;
};

void test0() {
    Init();

    mems[0] = Allocate(8);
    SetMem<uint64_t>(mems[0], 128);
    uint64_t t0 = GetMem<uint64_t>(mems[0]);
    mems[1] = Allocate(4);
    uint64_t t1 = GetMem<uint64_t>(mems[0]);
    SetMem<uint32_t>(mems[1], 256);
    uint64_t t2 = GetMem<uint64_t>(mems[0]);
    mems[2] = Allocate(64);
    int* a = (int*)OffsetFromMemSegInfo(mems[2]);
    for (int i = 0; i < 16; ++i) {
        a[i] = i;
    }
    mems[3] = Allocate(sizeof(MyStruct) * 8);
    MyStruct* b = (MyStruct*)OffsetFromMemSegInfo(mems[3]);
    for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i) {
        b[i] = { (uint64_t)i, (uint64_t)i * 2, (uint32_t)i * 3, (uint32_t)i * 4 };
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 16; ++i) {
        printf("%d ", a[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");

    Free(mems[1]);
    printf("%lld\n", GetMem<uint64_t>(mems[0]));
    for (int i = 0; i < 16; ++i) {
        printf("%d ", a[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
    for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i) {
        printf("%lld %lld %ld %ld\t", b[i].m_a, b[i].m_b, b[i].m_c, b[i].m_d);
    }

    Cleanup();
}


TestType* bufferManaged[TestSize];
void test1_managed() {
    Init();
    
    /***ALLOCATION START***/
    system_clock::time_point beg_alloc = system_clock::now();
    TestType sum = 0;
    for (uint64_t i = 0; i < TestSize; ++i) {
        TestType val = i % INT32_MAX;
        bufferManaged[i] = new (OffsetFromMemSegInfo(Allocate(sizeof(TestType)))) TestType(val);
        sum += *bufferManaged[i];
    }
    /***ALLOCATION END***/
    std::atomic_signal_fence(std::memory_order_seq_cst);
    system_clock::time_point end_alloc = system_clock::now();
    printf("managed %llu ns\n", (std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(end_alloc - beg_alloc)).count());
    printf("sum %d\n", sum);

    system_clock::time_point beg_free = system_clock::now();
    for (uint64_t i = 0; i < TestSize; ++i) {
        Free((MemSegInfo*)OffsetToMemSegInfo(bufferManaged[i]));
    }
    Cleanup();
    std::atomic_signal_fence(std::memory_order_seq_cst);
    system_clock::time_point end_free = system_clock::now();
    printf("managedfree %llu ns\n\n", (std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(end_free - beg_free)).count());
}

TestType* bufferUnmanaged[TestSize];
void test1_unmnged() {
    system_clock::time_point beg_alloc = system_clock::now();
    TestType sum = 0;
    for (uint64_t i = 0; i < TestSize; ++i) {
        TestType val = i % INT32_MAX;
        bufferUnmanaged[i] = new TestType(val);
        sum += *bufferUnmanaged[i];
    }
    std::atomic_signal_fence(std::memory_order_seq_cst);
    system_clock::time_point end_alloc = system_clock::now();
    printf("unmnged %llu ns\n", (std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(end_alloc - beg_alloc)).count());
    printf("sum %d\n", sum);

    system_clock::time_point beg_free = system_clock::now();
    for (uint64_t i = 0; i < TestSize; ++i) {
        delete bufferUnmanaged[i];
    }
    std::atomic_signal_fence(std::memory_order_seq_cst);
    system_clock::time_point end_free = system_clock::now();
    printf("unmngedfree %llu ns\n\n", (std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(end_free - beg_free)).count());
}

void test1() {
    std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
    auto epoch = now.time_since_epoch();
    auto value = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(epoch);
    long duration = value.count();
    srand(duration);

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        printf("test%d\n", i);
        test1_managed();
        test1_unmnged();
        printf("\n");
    }
}

void test() {
    test1();
}
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  • 1
    And the first detail is missing - how you compile the code.
    – 273K
    Jul 2 at 23:44
  • @273K Sorry I forgot. I have edited the question.
    – tigerccx
    Jul 3 at 0:11
  • 3
    When you memset you populate the virtual->physical mampping of the allocated memory and prime the caches. If you didn't include the memset in your timing then that would make a huge difference. Jul 3 at 0:19
  • @GoswinvonBrederlow Hi, thank you for the answer. I am not very clear about the details of how cache work. As I remember, if the CPU wishes to access a part of the memory, it will go for the cache first. If the data is in cache, it will use that. But if not, it will then go access the memory and load a block of local data. I am not sure if my understanding is correct. If it is, then would not my first few allocations populate the caches the same way as memset does (, as in they access the beginning of my allocated memory)? If it is not, could you help me get the right idea of cache?
    – tigerccx
    Jul 3 at 16:18
  • Besides the cache there is also a read ahead predictor. memset is nice a linear and predicting what memory will be read next in advance becomes trivial. That way the memory will be in cache by the time you actually use it. With a random access to the data this might not happen as smoothly. But all of this is just guessing. Your cpus has a bunch of preformance counters you can query with tools like perf to see what is really going on. Jul 3 at 16:43

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