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I have a situation with SQL Server 2012 Express and an Index that throws a "Duplicate Key Exception" without a reason. This code works on multiple machines, but in a particular QA department's Workstation this error appear sometimes, I can´t figure out the cause and I can't replicate this in other machines.

In context:

The information is generated by third party equipment, and the software tries to synchronize that information with its own database. The software receives the information when asking for it or with a notification event generated by the equipment. It tries to insert the data and always inserts the data but sometimes SQL Server throws a "Duplicate Key Exception". I added several logs to diagnose the problem and I could discard a double execution of the saving function and saw that the problem is the "Duplicate Key Exception" on the index, even with a successful inserted data.

I use .NET Core 6 and System.Data.SqlClient (4.8.2) library. I tried several ways to insert the data without success. I tried the ExecuteNonQuery, ExecuteScalar and ExecuteReader functions with different SQL code to insert. I tried using OUTPUT INSERTED.TransactionID, checking existence of the key before inserting, returning 0 or 1 to differentiate the successful insert from the failed one, but each attempt finished with the same problem returning the "Duplicate Key Exception".

This code creates the table if it doesn't exist.

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[FOO].[Transactions]') AND type in (N'U'))
    BEGIN
        CREATE TABLE [FOO].[Transactions](              
            [TransactionID] [bigint] NOT NULL,
            [DeviceID] [tinyint] NOT NULL,
            [TransactionNumber] [bigint] NOT NULL,
            [Material] [text] NULL,
            [Volume] [decimal](15, 3) NOT NULL,
            [StartDateTime] [datetime2](7) NOT NULL,
            [EndDateTime] [datetime2](7) NOT NULL,
            [StartingVolume] [decimal](15, 3) NOT NULL,
            [EndingVolume] [decimal](15, 3) NOT NULL,
        PRIMARY KEY 
        (
            [TransactionID] ASC
        )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
        ) ON [PRIMARY] TEXTIMAGE_ON [PRIMARY]
    END;

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.indexes WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[FOO].[transactions]') AND name = N'IX_transaction_number')
    CREATE INDEX [IX_transaction_number] ON [FOO].[transactions]
    (
        [TransactionNumber] DESC
    )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY];
                

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.indexes WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[FOO].[transactions]') AND name = N'IX_device_sale')
    CREATE UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX_device_sale] ON [FOO].[transactions]
    (
        [DeviceID] ASC,
        [TransactionNumber] DESC
    )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY];

This one of the variant code to makes the insert:

INSERT INTO [FOO].[Transactions]
        ([TransactionID],[DeviceID],[TransactionNumber],[Material],[Volume],[StartDateTime],[EndDateTime],[StartingVolume],[EndingVolume])
VALUES
    (@TransactionID ,@DeviceID,@TransactionNumber,@Material,@Volume,@StartDateTime,@EndDateTime,@StartingVolume,@EndingVolume);

This SQL code return 0, but in the StatementCompleted event of the SqlCommand class is triggered with 1 affected row from the insert.

IF EXISTS (SELECT TOP 1 * FROM [SCD].[Transactions] WHERE [SaleID] = @SaleID)
BEGIN
    SELECT 0;
END
ELSE
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO [SCD].[Transactions]
                    ([TransactionID],[DeviceID],[TransactionNumber],[Material],[Volume],[StartDateTime],[EndDateTime],[StartingVolume],[EndingVolume])
                VALUES
                    (@TransactionID ,@DeviceID,@TransactionNumber,@Material,@Volume,@StartDateTime,@EndDateTime,@StartingVolume,@EndingVolume);
        SELECT 1;
    END

This is the C# code for insert:

private int SaveTransaction(SqlConnection connection, TransactionInfo transaction)
{
    try
    {
        _logger.LogInformation("[REPOSITORY] Starting to save TransactionID:{0} at {1} ns",transaction.TransactionID,Stopwatch.GetTimestamp());
        using SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(INSERT_TRANSACTION, connection);
        cmd.Parameters.Add("TransactionID", System.Data.SqlDbType.BigInt).Value = transaction.TransactionID;
        cmd.Parameters.Add("DeviceID", System.Data.SqlDbType.SmallInt).Value = transaction.PumpID;
        cmd.Parameters.Add("TransactionNumber", System.Data.SqlDbType.BigInt).Value = transaction.TransactionNumber;
        cmd.Parameters.Add("Material", System.Data.SqlDbType.Text).Value = transaction.Material;
        cmd.Parameters.Add("Volume", System.Data.SqlDbType.Decimal).Value = transaction.Volume;
        cmd.Parameters.Add("StartDateTime", System.Data.SqlDbType.DateTime2).Value = transaction.StartDateTime;
        cmd.Parameters.Add("EndDateTime", System.Data.SqlDbType.DateTime2).Value = transaction.EndDateTime;
        cmd.Parameters.Add("StartingVolume", System.Data.SqlDbType.Decimal).Value = transaction.StartingVolume;
        cmd.Parameters.Add("EndingVolume", System.Data.SqlDbType.Decimal).Value = transaction.EndingVolume;
        var res = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        _logger.LogInformation("[REPOSITORY] Ending to save TransactionID:{0} at {1} ns Result:{2}", transaction.TransactionID, Stopwatch.GetTimestamp(),res);
        return res > 0 ? 1 : 0;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        _logger.LogInformation("[REPOSITORY] Error saving TransactionID:{0} at {1} ns \n {2}", transaction.TransactionID, Stopwatch.GetTimestamp(), ex.Message);
        _logger.LogError(ex, ex.Message);
        return -1;
    }
}

The questions: What SQL Server configuration or detail can cause this kind of exception? Where can I look for the source of the problem?

EDIT This is the calling function, here the connection is created and closed.

 public int SaveTransaction(TransactionInfo transaction)
{
        using SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(_connectionString);
    try
    {
        connection.Open();
        var res = SaveTransaction(connection, transaction);
        return res;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        _logger.LogError(ex, ex.Message);
        return -1;
    }
    finally
    {
        connection.Close();
    }
}
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  • 6
    The error is correct - somewhere you are trying to insert a duplicate key... there is no setting or alternative insert method to get around that, aside from disabling the unique key constraint. Based on the code shown you are either trying to insert a duplicate TransactionID or a duplicate DeviceID, TransactionNumber pair - you just need to work out how that is happening.
    – Dale K
    Jul 5 at 21:35
  • 5
    Not an answer to your question but you should consider upgrading from sql server 2012. In just 7 days it will be fully unsupported.
    – Sean Lange
    Jul 5 at 21:57
  • 1
    @mzn and CREATE UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX_device_sale]
    – Dale K
    Jul 5 at 22:00
  • 2
    Are you looking at the right event? 1 row will be affected in both cases because you issue a select which returns a single row in both cases. The code as written is also not really safe, because there's a delay between the check for existing data, and then the insert. What if two processes are executing with the same parameters at nearly the same time? The first one does it's check, then the second does its check, then the first does its insert (successfully), and the second will now attempt to do the insert (the row didn't exist when the check was run), but it will be a duplicate.
    – allmhuran
    Jul 5 at 22:52
  • 2
    The technique to guard against the scenario I described is actually less trivial than you might think: You issue a combination of updlock and holdlock hints, either in the first of two statements (your current pattern), or in a single statement using insert ... select ... where not exists .... See this question
    – allmhuran
    Jul 5 at 23:07

1 Answer 1

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put your connection in an using block. This ensures that the connection trash collection occurs. Call a stored procedure for doing the transaction processing. Put error handling in the stored procedure and catch for it in your c# code. rebuild your indexes. maybe one of the indexes is corrupt. you can also disable the primary key and complete all the transactions and then enable it.

ALTER INDEX constraint_name ON table_name DISABLE;

check for duplicates before enabling the primary key

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  • I'm not using async calls. In fact I suspect that in the first place, but the logs shows the ThreadId and that's only one thread executing and saving transactions
    – Frank
    Jul 6 at 21:06
  • did you move the logger.LogInformation before the transaction in SaveTransaction? I want to see if your application is calling the function twice Jul 6 at 21:56
  • The logger.LogInformation is not called twice, I already check that. I put that code to check the multiple execution scenarios, so if the cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(); is executed twice this should be reflected in the logs.
    – Frank
    Jul 7 at 17:05

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