59

In the below simple example, if CONDITION is not set in the script, running the script prints "True". However, one would expect it to print "False". What is the reason for this behavior?

# Set CONDITION by using true or false:
# CONDITION=true or false

if $CONDITION; then
    echo "True"
else
    echo "False"
fi
9
  • 1
    The Bash has it's own way of checking for an undefined or empty variable .. Your syntax, simply put is thought out wrong. Bash will look at that statement and say OK nothing equals nothing .. So true .. The way Bash handles checking for empty/non-existent variables is if [ -z ${CONDITION} ]; then
    – Zak
    Jul 6 at 21:14
  • 4
    More details here: stackoverflow.com/a/47876317/5303092
    – Jeff
    Jul 6 at 21:18
  • 2
    $CONDITION should probably be quoted here. Then you'll get an error message, which I'd consider better behaviour. Also, it should probably be lowercase too, unless it's an environment variable. Then ShellCheck will warn you that it's not assigned.
    – wjandrea
    Jul 6 at 21:42
  • 4
    Note that what you're doing here is storing a command in $CONDITION, and running it when entering the if. That's kinda icky in that if some part of the script accidentally stores something unexpected there (or if the value comes from the outside environment!), the script would run that as a command. Best case: an error message, worst case: running a command with consequences. It might be better to explicitly use [ "$CONDITION" = true ] to test for true vs. any other value (or unset variable); or [ "$CONDITION" ] to test for any non-empty value vs. an empty value (or unset variable).
    – ilkkachu
    Jul 7 at 12:09
  • 4
    As a rule of thumb: if a variable isn't quoted there is a 99.9% chance that your script is wrong or broken anyway. There are only very specific circumstances in which non-quoting a variable expansion is what you really want.
    – GACy20
    Jul 7 at 15:28

1 Answer 1

78

The argument to if is a statement to execute, and its exit status is tested. If the exit status is 0 the condition is true and the statements in then are executed.

When $CONDITION isn't set, the statement is an empty statement, and empty statements always have a zero exit status, meaning success. So the if condition succeeds.

This behavior is explained in the POSIX shell specification:

If there is no command name, but the command contained a command substitution, the command shall complete with the exit status of the last command substitution performed. Otherwise, the command shall complete with a zero exit status.

8
  • 4
    Because that's not an empty statement. It's trying to find a program whose name is the empty string.
    – Barmar
    Jul 6 at 21:33
  • 5
    You'd get the same error if you did if "$CONDITION"
    – Barmar
    Jul 6 at 21:34
  • 22
    This really is a weird edge case, because if ; then echo yes; fi is a syntax error, but if $unset; then echo yes; fi is OK. I suppose the difference is that the former is not "given a statement to execute"; the latter is given one but it just happens to be null. Jul 6 at 21:55
  • 11
    Right. The difference is that the first error is detected during parsing, while the second executes after the statement is parsed and the variable substituted.
    – Barmar
    Jul 6 at 21:56
  • 3
    2.9.1 Simple Commands, last part: "If there is no command name, but the command contained a command substitution, the command shall complete with the exit status of the last command substitution performed. Otherwise, the command shall complete with a zero exit status." You could also have something like if "$@"; then ... which would result in an empty command if there were no positional parameters. The grammar does require at least something there, but a simple redirection would also do...
    – ilkkachu
    Jul 7 at 12:05

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