6

For compliance reasons we want to block SQL analysts from running SELECT * on a table. Instead, we want to force them to explicitly ask for the columns they want to select. How can I enforce this with Snowflake?

I saw a tip for SQL server using a calculated column, does Snowflake have an equivalent?

enter image description here

4 Answers 4

7

Sure, you can create tables with derived/computed columns in Snowflake:

create or replace table mytable (
    i number, s string
    , no_select_star number as (1/0));

Once that table has data, you won't be able to run select * on it, as the division by 0 is an invalid number:

enter image description here

You can also append a computed column to an existing table for the same effects:

alter table mytable2
add column no_select_star number as (1/0);

In action:

enter image description here

4
  • 1
    Altough this approach disables the ability to perform SELECT * on tables I am not fan of it for the following reasons 1) schema pollution(now all tools will detect additional unusable column) 2) the same expression (1\0) has to be defined on all views/user defined function to disable SELECT * FROM view 3) There is implicit expectation the expression will never be evaluated by some query optimization, rewrites(potentialy erroring out valid query) even if computed column is not used 4) disabling language construct should be provied as session parameter(idea for new feature:) Jul 7, 2022 at 14:21
  • 5) If the goal is to remove SELECT * from codebase - then SQL linter capable of detecting astersik as antipattern is a more appropriate way, plus educationg users of good patterns Jul 7, 2022 at 14:21
  • Lukasz, you bring up a number of good points; however, it's a workaround and by definition workarounds are not ideal solutions. What I'm wondering is if there's some way to get a message to the user that it's the select * that's causing the error. I tried a JS UDF that throws an error, but that can't be used as a default for a column. Jul 7, 2022 at 14:36
  • @GregPavlik Yes, it is possible to display custom message using truncation error. Please see my answer Jul 7, 2022 at 16:47
7

Why not use a row access policy, instead? It might take some tweaking, but you could create a row access policy similar to:

create or replace row access policy test_policy as (val varchar) returns boolean ->
  case
    when lower(current_statement()) like '%select%*%' 
  then false else true end;

Applying this policy to a table would not return any records if a select * was present in the query. You could apply this policy to every table and it wouldn't affect your schema in any way.

6
  • Snowflake's Data Clean Room framework leverages this concept quite a bit...although probably more eloquently than my example. Jul 7, 2022 at 20:18
  • The RAP should use ilike to be case insensitive. It should also use two wildcards surrounding the star like this: ilike '%select%*%' Jul 8, 2022 at 13:08
  • 1
    I lowercased the statement, so ilike isn't necessary. Jul 8, 2022 at 16:56
  • Agree with the additional wildcard, though. Jul 8, 2022 at 16:57
  • 1
    The method will fail with a query like, "select 1,*", which will defeat the intended purpose.
    – Ron Dunn
    Jul 9, 2022 at 8:09
6

it's a workaround and by definition workarounds are not ideal solutions. What I'm wondering is if there's some way to get a message to the user that it's the select * that's causing the error. I tried a JS UDF that throws an error, but that can't be used as a default for a column.

It is possible to use truncation error to display custom message:

create or replace table mytable (
    i number, s string
    , no_select_star string as ('Code smell: SELECT * '::CHAR(1))
);
    
INSERT INTO mytable(i, s)  VALUES (1, 'a');

Query:

SELECT * FROM  mytable;

Output:

enter image description here

1
  • 2
    👍 for this. As a workaround, the ability to let the user know it's a deliberate effort to avoid select * is much better than Divide by zero, which would be confusing. Jul 7, 2022 at 17:32
0

Here's an alternative approach.

  1. No dodgy columns

  2. No schema pollution

  3. Education message to user customisable

  4. Native Snowflake functionality

  5. Handles '*' in any position (select col , * ...)

  6. Does take more thought to set up -> must be applied to each column

  7. Can update ALL your tables with new error messages in one fell swoop

  8. Extendable/adaptable to include any other dodgy SQL your lovely users dream up

  9. You get to learn about Dynamic Masking which is super cool!

  10. To use in production you'd need to handle ALL datatypes -> would be nice if there was a Dynamic Mask for the entire table.

  11. Still runs the SQL in background but hopefully after the users get sick of seeing 'bad bad bad' they'll change their ways.

  12. Allows you to exempt SOME users (e.g. exempt yourself for select top 10 *)

    create or replace masking policy select_star_bad_bad_bad as (val string) 
    returns string ->
    case
       when REGEXP_COUNT(current_statement(),$$\*+$$) >0 then'select * = bad bad bad'
      else val
    end;
    
    alter table if exists mytable1 modify column s set masking policy select_star_bad_bad_bad;
    

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