10

I'm using Git, I've changed the following line in .bashrc, To show the current checkedout branch in prompt, when pwd is a Git Repo. Operating System I'm using is: Ubuntu 32bit

# Original PS1 Line
PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\$ '

I'm using this line to display current branch of git repo in shell prompt, instead of, the above line.

# PS1 Line to show current Git Branch in the Prompt
PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\[\033[01;32m\]$(__git_ps1 " (%s)")\[\033[00m\]\$ '

The Problem is when I give it to friends, Shell gives error __git_ps1: command not found, while navigating between directories, as the script checks for git branch on changing directories. How do I check if Git is installed and perform the branch check only if git is installed?

Edit: As suggested by ayckoster, I cameup with the following lines of code:

if [ "$color_prompt" = yes ]; then
    git --version
    GIT_IS_AVAILABLE=$?
    if [ $GIT_IS_AVAILABLE -eq 0 ]; then
        # PS1 Line to show current Git Branch in the Prompt
        PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\[\033[01;32m\]$(__git_ps1 " (%s)")\[\033[00m\]\$ '
    else
        # Original PS1 Line
        PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\$ '
    fi
else
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ '
fi

Now, Everytime I open the terminal I get the git --version outputted to screen, while Git is installed, and I get the following error, while opening terminal when Git is not installed:

The program 'git' is currently not installed.  You can install it by typing:
sudo apt-get install git

How do I clear this? Thanks.

Final Edit:

This is the code I came up with finally, Feel Free to use this code in your .bashrc to display current git branch in your shell prompt

if [ "$color_prompt" = yes ]; then
    if git --version &>/dev/null; then
        # PS1 Line to show current Git Branch in the Prompt
        PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\[\033[01;32m\]$(__git_ps1 " (%s)")\[\033[00m\]\$ '
    else
        # Original PS1 Line
        PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\$ '
    fi
else
    if git --version &>/dev/null; then
        # PS1 Line to show current Git Branch in the Prompt
        PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w $(__git_ps1 "(%s)")\$ '
    else
        # Original PS1 Line
            PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ '
    fi
fi
  • Note that the __git_ps1 function is not always available. - It is not available on my git 2.3.2 on a Mac for instance. It is available here though: github.com/git/git/blob/… – Benjamin Goodacre Sep 22 '15 at 15:26
21

Try to execute

git --version

Depending on the return value $? you can assume git is installed or not. If you get 0 everything is fine otherwise git is not installed. You can also test this.

This assumes everything is setup correctly and git is in your $PATH and the git command is not renamed.

Use it like this

git --version 2>&1 >/dev/null # improvement by tripleee
GIT_IS_AVAILABLE=$?
# ...
if [ $GIT_IS_AVAILABLE -eq 0 ]; then #...
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    You probably don't want the output of git --version on your screen every time. Also I would suggest doing the check in the conditional; if git --version 2>&1 >/dev/null ; then ... – tripleee Sep 3 '11 at 21:03
  • Thanks for the hint. It depends if he needs the information only once. I added your suggestion to my initial snippet. It makes sense to skip the variable if you only use it once. – ayckoster Sep 3 '11 at 21:54
4

using which should help. If it returns nothing --> git is not installed.

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  • 3
    which is evil; use the built-ins of Bash as suggested in other replies. – tripleee Sep 3 '11 at 11:10
  • I guessed this wasn't the best way around but it was the only one I could think of ;-) – Jonathan Liuti Sep 3 '11 at 13:24
  • 1
    @tiplee: Why is which evil aside from the fact that it spawns a process? Using the Bash built-in hash has the limitation that it only works if git has been called as a command, so there could be the case where git is installed but the hash command returns nothing. gnu.org/s/bash/manual/bash.html – Matthew Rankin Sep 4 '11 at 1:00
  • 2
    @Matthew: Because which is still a nonstandard command; there are installations where it is not included, and still some old installations where it is a csh script whose output is not correct for your Bourne-compatible shell, if you have a different PATH, for example. Finally, if the binary is shadowed by a function or alias, only your shell will know. type is the command I would have recommended, although I was also under the impression that hash has options to make it perform a search. – tripleee Sep 4 '11 at 5:52
4
#!/bin/bash
command -v git >/dev/null 2>&1 ||
{ echo >&2 "Git is not installed. Installing..";
  yum install git
}
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  • 1
    Dude best answer BY FAR. this is great because the script only ascends to sudo privileges (under ubuntu so I used sudo apt install instead of yum install) if git isn't installed and only AFTER printing the message, so the user understands what's going on. if git is already installed it does not promt for sudo password. – tatsu May 9 '18 at 15:33
2

I recommend using hash as it's a built-in so no need to create a new process. It also caches the command.

hash git && commands
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  • 1
    Good recommendation to use a Bash built-in, but in full disclosure it should be noted that it is possible for git to be installed but not be in the hash table (although that's probably such a rare thing so as to be immaterial). I'd also be interested in why you received a downvote. – Matthew Rankin Sep 4 '11 at 1:01
2

use type:

$ type -t git
file
$ type -t nogit
$
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0

You could use the following to conditionally change your Bash prompt based on the existence of Git:

PS1='$no-git-prompt'
if [ -a /usr/local/bin/git ] || [ -a /usr/local/git ]; then
    PS1='$git-prompt'

The Linux Tutorial Blog entry "Tutorial: Conditions in bash scripting (if statements)" shows the different if conditions available, such as -a to check for the existence of a file.

The problem I see with this solution is that it is dependent on the location of git (i.e., /usr/local/bin/ or /usr/local/ in the above example). This may not be a problem since git on Ubuntu is found in /usr/local/ when git is installed via apt-get.

If you want to not be dependent on the installed location of git, then you could use command substitution to look at the results of the which command.

PS1='$no-git-prompt'
if [ $(which git) ]; then
    PS1='$git-prompt'

However, using which has been deemed as "evil" by other answerers. (Although, I'd be interested in them fleshing out their reasoning for such statements instead of just making the declaration without providing their reasoning.)

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0

This worked for me:

GIT_VERSION="$(git --version)" if [ "$GIT_VERSION" != "command not found" ]; then echo "git already" installed else echo "git is missing" fi

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