2

In my program I have function to create log. Inside the function I check if a variable is true to continue its working or not.

private void log(string text)
{
    if(LOGGING_ENABLED)
        logtextbox.Text = text;
}

Is there any way to disable a function outside, without using any if inside the function or in parameter, to disable all occurrences of function in program.

  • 3
    Those are usually called methods in C# (also they usually are capitalized) – H.B. Sep 3 '11 at 12:41
  • I still call them functions, I was initially writing it capitalized but something itched my mind and I changed it :) – SMUsamaShah Sep 3 '11 at 12:45
10

You can use the ConditionalAttribute. Calls to a method with this attribute are compiled out depending on whether the condition is defined. For example:

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
private void log(string text){
   logtextbox.Text = text;
}

Calls to this method will show up in Debug mode, but will not be in your code in Release mode, because the DEBUG condition is only defined during Debug mode.

Edit: In response to some of your questions, I'd recommend taking a look at the API Reference page. It has some pretty simple examples and explanations on how to use the attribute and its effects.

3

You could use conditional compilation like so:

private void log(string text)
{
  #if DEBUG
    logtextbox.Text = text;
  #endif
}

Using this, your log method would only log do it's work when your project is compiled in DEBUG-mode inside Visual Studio.

  • 1
    In that case the Conditional attribute would be more adequate – Thomas Levesque Sep 3 '11 at 12:44
  • 1
    The problem with this is that if the test string is constructed from a costly expression, then that construction will still happen at the call site (it could have side effects, so the compiler can't remove it). Using an attribute will erase calls to the function itself, and thus won't have a performance impact. – Clément Jul 2 '15 at 18:59
3

The only way to disable the method even being called, would be by using preprocessor directives, as others have mentioned. You can do this also by using an attribute:

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
private void log(string text)
{
    logtextbox.Text = text;
}
2

If you use it only for debug purpose you can use [ConditionalAttribute("DEBUG")] attribute on top of function, or you can use #if/#endif precompiled dirrectives to sign your code that will run only if specified condition is signed before compilation. For example, to remove completely the function from release build you can do something like this.

#if DEBUG
private void log(string text)
{
    if(LOGGING_ENABLED)
        logtextbox.Text = text;
}
#endif

The thing is to keep in mind that the same #if/#endif has to be applied to all calls of this method in this case.

  • this would work but also makes the code behaving differently in debug/release and sometimes can bring in major issues in finding bugs. It is a valid approach sometimes but in our enterprise level applications we do avoid this, always have same code running and we use configuration for disabling or not certain parts. – Davide Piras Sep 3 '11 at 12:45
  • Will I write [DEBUG] above function 'definition' or with each use of it? – SMUsamaShah Sep 3 '11 at 12:47
  • @Davide Piras: agree, but like everything, use it when you need it and do not exaggerate. – Tigran Sep 3 '11 at 12:49
  • @LifeH2O: yes, just DEBUG should be enough. In difference of #if technique, by using attribute your source compiles, but the final IL code will not contain the calls to that function. For better understanding what I'm talking about look here: switchonthecode.com/tutorials/… – Tigran Sep 3 '11 at 12:55
1

in fact your example is a bit simple because you want to disable log to user interface and this is probably local to that form and not application wide.

what usually is done with logging engines, like NLog and Log4Net or any other one is using configuration to control how much and how logging is performed.

for example there is a concept of log level, if you have it set for FATAL only fatal errors are logged, if you set it to ALL everything is logged, including info and verbose logs.

those frameworks also have configurable appenders in thea pp.config or web.config files so you can simply add or disable certain appenders depending on your needs (like RollingFile appender, SMTPAppender, EventLogAppender and many others...)

  • Thankyou very much for informations. I was curious about logging levels two and was thinking to use more functions etc for that. – SMUsamaShah Sep 3 '11 at 12:52
0

You can throw a NotSupportedException, mark it as Obsolete and use EditorBrowsable:

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