35

I'm developing an iphone app and I need to have some functions to use globally in my classes.

But how can I do this?

I just tried to create functions.h likes this

#include <Foundation/Foundation.h>

- (void)printTest;

and in the functions.m

#import "functions.h"

- (void)prinTest {
    NSLog(@"test");
}

but it doesn't work. Says me: "Method definition not in a @implementation context".

5 Answers 5

64

First note that Objective-C language is a superset of C language (meaning there is absolutely nothing wrong with mixing them).

There are two approaches.

#1 Real global function:

Declare a global C-style function, which can have ObjC logic (in definetion instead of just C-style logic).

Header:

void GSPrintTest();

Implementation:

#import "functions.h"

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

void GSPrintTest() {
  NSLog(@"test");
}

Call using:

#import "functions.h"
...
GSPrintTest();

A third (bad, but possible) option would be adding a category to NSObject for your methods:

Header:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface NSObject(GlobalStuff)
- (void) printTest;
@end

Implementation:

#import "functions.h"

@implementation NSObject(GlobalStuff)
- (void) printTest {
  NSLog(@"test");
}
@end

Call using:

#import "functions.h"
...
[self printTest];

#2 class method:

Create a class method with + sign, in helper class (instead of instance method with - sign).

Header:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface GlobalStuff : NSObject {}

+ (void)printTest;

@end

Implementation:

#import "functions.h"

@implementation GlobalStuff

+ (void) printTest {
  NSLog(@"test");
}

@end

Call using:

#import "functions.h"

...
[GlobalStuff printTest];
3
  • The first two ways works well. Except the second one that returns a warning: No previous prototype for GSPrintTest(). Is it normal? Anyway the first method it's very good. Only a question: Why don't I need to create an instance of that class for use it? Commented Sep 3, 2011 at 16:39
  • 1
    As for the second problem, it looks now like I have GKPrintTest instead of GSPrintTest, but that's probably not your problem. Did you remember to include functions.h in the file where you call it as well as the file containing the implementation of GSPrintTest?
    – Ed Marty
    Commented Sep 4, 2011 at 23:00
  • 1
    And to answer the first question, you don't need an instance because it is a static method, declared to be a member of the class itself rather than of instances of the class. So you're calling a method on an object just like normal, except the object is a class instead of an instance.
    – Ed Marty
    Commented Sep 4, 2011 at 23:01
16
+50

When you want a global function, just write a regular C function. The Objective-C syntax is meant to be used solely in the context of object methods.

void printTest() {
    NSLog(@"This is a test");
}

You also have to add the declaration in the functions.h header:

void printTest();
5
  • My function it's an Obj-C function that accepts arguments as normally. In your way the warning is: "No previous prototypefor 'printTest'". Commented Sep 3, 2011 at 16:10
  • 3
    @Fred Collins - There is no such thing as an Obj-C function. Objective-C implements only Objective-C methods and C functions.
    – mouviciel
    Commented Sep 3, 2011 at 16:33
  • And how would pass the parameters to this function?
    – Resty
    Commented Aug 25, 2014 at 6:01
  • @Resty simply write the arguments using the C-style, e.g: BOOL isEvenNumber(NSNumber * number); or NSData * readFileAtPath(NSURL * path); Commented Apr 10, 2018 at 13:52
  • Bounty sent to @Eelke for a very informative old answer!
    – Fattie
    Commented Jan 9, 2019 at 12:45
4

Simple. Your setup is almost perfect.

Just #include your Functions.h in all classes that need it, and you should be all set. I do it all the time.

You will have to use some kind of object, but you can make it "feel" just like a global objective-c function by using a category of NSObject:

  • Create a new file and choose Objective C Category.
  • Make it a category of NSObject.
  • Use the templates provided to define and implement your methods.

Now you can use them simply by invoking

[self myCategoryMethod:optionalParameter];
1
  • As already said, it returns me Method definition not in a @implementation context. Can you show me how you use it all the time? Commented Sep 3, 2011 at 16:25
0

Try to rename functions.m into functions.c.

Or add this methods into some class SharedClass and decline them as static : + (void)prinTest. Then you can access them using this code

[SharedClass printTest];
2
  • Yep I know I can use singleton classes but probably, only for some methods, it's useless. Don't think so? Commented Sep 3, 2011 at 16:11
  • I think, it is ok. Why do you see any problems?
    – Nekto
    Commented Sep 3, 2011 at 17:16
0

What your error is referring to is you need to have that method in an interface.

@interface SomeClass
- (void)printTest;
@end

To use a static void throughout your app (where you have included your Functions.h), try the following:

void printTest ()
{
    /* do your print stuff */
}
1
  • I don't want any class. I would only simple function. Commented Sep 3, 2011 at 16:25

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