6

I'm pretty desperate because I can't figure out how to achieve what I stated in the question. I've already read countless of similar examples but didn't find one which works in exact situation. So, let's say I have the following code:

<table><tr>
<td><a href="url-a">text A</a></td><td><a>id A</a></td><td><a>img A</a></td>
<td><a href="url-b">text B</a></td><td><a>id B</a></td><td><a>img B</a></td>
<td><a href="url-c">text C</a></td><td><a>id C</a></td><td><a>img C</a></td>
</tr></table>

Now, what I already have is a part of url-a. I basically want to know how I can get id A and img A. I'm trying to "find" the line with XPath but I can't work out a way to make it work. Also, it might be possible that the information is not present at all. This is my latest try (seriously, I've tinkered with this for more than 3 hours now trying numerous different ways):

if (htmlDoc.DocumentNode.SelectSingleNode(@"/a[contains(@href, 'part-url-a')]") != null)
    string ida = htmlDoc.DocumentNode.SelectSingleNode(@"/a[contains(@href, 'part-url-a')]/following-sibling::a").InnerText;

Well, it's apparently wrong as hell so I'd be very pleased if someone could help me out here. Also I'd appreciate it if someone could point me to some Website which explains XPath and the notations/Syntax in detail with examples like this one. Books also welcome.

PS: I know I could achieve my goal without XPath at all too with Regex or just a simple StreamReader in C# and checking if each line contains what I need but a) it's too fragile for my needs because the code might have abrupt line-breaks and b) I really want to stay consistend with sticking completely to XPath for anything I'm doing in this project.

Thanks in advance for your help!

  • Good question, +1. See my answer for the exact XPath expressions that select the wanted text nodes. – Dimitre Novatchev Sep 3 '11 at 19:49
8

Use the following XPath expressions:

   /*/tr/td[a[@href='url-a']]
                /following-sibling::td[1]
                     /a/text()

When evaluated against the provided (malformed but corrected) XML document:

<table><tr>
<td><a href="url-a">text A</a></td><td><a>id A</a></td><td><a>img A</a></td>
<td><a href="url-b">text B</a></td><td><a>id B</a></td><td><a>img B</a></td>
<td><a href="url-c">text C</a></td><td><a>id C</a></td><td><a>img C</a></td>
</tr></table>

the wanted text node is selected:

id A

Similarly, this XPath expression:

   /*/tr/td[a[@href='url-a']]
                /following-sibling::td[2]
                     /a/text()

when evaluated against the same XML document (above), selects the other wanted text node:

img A

XSLT-based verification:

When this transformation is applied on the XML document (above):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
   "/*/tr/td[a[@href='url-a']]
                /following-sibling::td[1]
                     /a/text()"/>

  <xsl:text>&#10;</xsl:text>
  <xsl:copy-of select=
   "/*/tr/td[a[@href='url-a']]
                /following-sibling::td[2]
                     /a/text()"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

the wanted results are produced:

id A
img A
| improve this answer | |
  • I'll try your solution as well and report back how it worked out. Thanks. – Gernony Sep 3 '11 at 20:39
  • Ok, I needed to do a few adjustments (e.g. because I only had a part of the url and not the full one to match) but all in all it worked like a charm! Thanks a lot. Not only did it help me with this issue but I finally understood how complex XPath Syntax actually works in practice. I'll also take a look at your XPath Visualizer, guess that'll be exactly what I need :-) – Gernony Sep 3 '11 at 23:47
2

You have a seriously broken HTML with unmatching closing td tags. Fix them please. It's just an ugly picture this markup.

This being said hopefully Html Agility Pack can handle any crap that you throw at it, so here's how to proceed and parse the junk you have and find the id and img values given the href:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var doc = new HtmlDocument();
        doc.Load("test.html");
        var anchor = doc.DocumentNode.SelectSingleNode("//a[contains(@href, 'url-a')]");
        if (anchor != null)
        {
            var id = anchor.ParentNode.SelectSingleNode("following-sibling::td/a");
            if (id != null)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(id.InnerHtml);
                var img = id.ParentNode.SelectSingleNode("following-sibling::td/a");
                if (img != null)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(img.InnerHtml);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • @_Darin Dimitrov: The wanted text nodes can be selected with a single XPath expression (irrespective of the programming language that is hosting XPath) -- see my answer. – Dimitre Novatchev Sep 3 '11 at 19:51
  • @Dimitre Novatchev, wow, you are a real XPath guru :-) That's really great. It looks like Chineese to me but if it works it's really nice. – Darin Dimitrov Sep 3 '11 at 19:56
  • @_Darin Dimitrov: Yes, it works, as demonstrated by the accompanying XSLT-based verification. While XPath is ellegant and powerful, it isn't especially difficult. You might be interested in my XPath Visualizer, which I wrote years ago. It has helped many thousands of programmers learn XPath the fun way - just by playing with different XPath expressions and incrementally improving their results. Link: huttar.net/dimitre/XPV/TopXML-XPV.html – Dimitre Novatchev Sep 3 '11 at 20:04
  • @Dimitre Novatchev, while it looks interesting, XPath is not something that I use in my everyday code. I prefer to avoid it due to my ignorance of it :-) This being said, I really admire XPath gurus, the same way I admire Regex gurus. Never really grasped those notions. I have only basic understanding of them and when needed I prefer to use some full blown parser that will do the job for me and avoid having to write and especially maintain code that contains them. – Darin Dimitrov Sep 3 '11 at 20:07
  • By the way I have just tested your XPath expressions and they work. Hat down to you. – Darin Dimitrov Sep 3 '11 at 20:10

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