What I want to do is change how a C# method executes when it is called, so that I can write something like this:

[Distributed]
public DTask<bool> Solve(int n, DEvent<bool> callback)
{
    for (int m = 2; m < n - 1; m += 1)
        if (m % n == 0)
            return false;
    return true;
}

At run-time, I need to be able to analyse methods that have the Distributed attribute (which I already can do) and then insert code before the body of the function executes and after the function returns. More importantly, I need to be able to do it without modifying code where Solve is called or at the start of the function (at compile time; doing so at run-time is the objective).

At the moment I have attempted this bit of code (assume t is the type that Solve is stored in, and m is a MethodInfo of Solve):

private void WrapMethod(Type t, MethodInfo m)
{
    // Generate ILasm for delegate.
    byte[] il = typeof(Dpm).GetMethod("ReplacedSolve").GetMethodBody().GetILAsByteArray();

    // Pin the bytes in the garbage collection.
    GCHandle h = GCHandle.Alloc((object)il, GCHandleType.Pinned);
    IntPtr addr = h.AddrOfPinnedObject();
    int size = il.Length;

    // Swap the method.
    MethodRental.SwapMethodBody(t, m.MetadataToken, addr, size, MethodRental.JitImmediate);
}

public DTask<bool> ReplacedSolve(int n, DEvent<bool> callback)
{
    Console.WriteLine("This was executed instead!");
    return true;
}

However, MethodRental.SwapMethodBody only works on dynamic modules; not those that have already been compiled and stored in the assembly.

So I'm looking for a way to effectively do SwapMethodBody on a method that is already stored in a loaded and executing assembly.

Note, it is not an issue if I have to completely copy the method into a dynamic module, but in this case I need to find a way to copy across the IL as well as update all of the calls to Solve() such that they would point to the new copy.

  • 3
    Not possible to swap methods already loaded. Otherwise Spring.Net wouldn't have to make strange things with proxies and interfaces :-) Read this question, it's tangent to your problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/25803/… (if you can intercept it, you can something-like-swap it... If you can't 1 then clearly you can't 2). – xanatos Sep 4 '11 at 12:12
  • In that case, is there a way to copy a method into a dynamic module, and update the rest of the assembly such that calls to that method point to the new copy? – June Rhodes Sep 4 '11 at 12:15
  • Same old-same old. If it could be done easily, all the various IoC containers would probably do it. They don't do it->99% it can't be done :-) (without terrible and innominable hacks). There is a single hope: they promised metaprogramming and async in C# 5.0. Async we have seen... Metaprogramming nothing... BUT it could be it! – xanatos Sep 4 '11 at 12:16
  • Could you make Solve() virtual and create a class during runtime that inherits from the class Solve() is in? – svick Sep 4 '11 at 12:16
  • 2
    Please see my answer below. This is totally possible. On code you don't own and during runtime. I don't understand why so many think this is not possible. – Andreas Pardeike Mar 14 '17 at 7:36
up vote -21 down vote accepted

Just think of the implications if this was possible. You could for example replace the contents of the String class and wreak havock. Once a method is loaded by the CLR it cannot be modified. You may take a look at AOP and libraries such as Castle DynamicProxy that are used by mocking frameworks such as Rhino Mocks.

  • 1
    This is actually possible. But i'm not sure if it will work on all string functions, because they are internally implemented (marked by [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.InternalCall)]). See my answer :) – Olivier Oct 16 '13 at 13:03
  • The types in the System assembly are fairly safe from injection because of NGen. – Mr Anderson Aug 16 '16 at 21:23

For .NET 4 and above

using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;


namespace InjectionTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Target targetInstance = new Target();

            targetInstance.test();

            Injection.install(1);
            Injection.install(2);
            Injection.install(3);
            Injection.install(4);

            targetInstance.test();

            Console.Read();
        }
    }

    public class Target
    {
        public void test()
        {
            targetMethod1();
            Console.WriteLine(targetMethod2());
            targetMethod3("Test");
            targetMethod4();
        }

        private void targetMethod1()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Target.targetMethod1()");

        }

        private string targetMethod2()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Target.targetMethod2()");
            return "Not injected 2";
        }

        public void targetMethod3(string text)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Target.targetMethod3("+text+")");
        }

        private void targetMethod4()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Target.targetMethod4()");
        }
    }

    public class Injection
    {        
        public static void install(int funcNum)
        {
            MethodInfo methodToReplace = typeof(Target).GetMethod("targetMethod"+ funcNum, BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Public);
            MethodInfo methodToInject = typeof(Injection).GetMethod("injectionMethod"+ funcNum, BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Public);
            RuntimeHelpers.PrepareMethod(methodToReplace.MethodHandle);
            RuntimeHelpers.PrepareMethod(methodToInject.MethodHandle);

            unsafe
            {
                if (IntPtr.Size == 4)
                {
                    int* inj = (int*)methodToInject.MethodHandle.Value.ToPointer() + 2;
                    int* tar = (int*)methodToReplace.MethodHandle.Value.ToPointer() + 2;
#if DEBUG
                    Console.WriteLine("\nVersion x86 Debug\n");

                    byte* injInst = (byte*)*inj;
                    byte* tarInst = (byte*)*tar;

                    int* injSrc = (int*)(injInst + 1);
                    int* tarSrc = (int*)(tarInst + 1);

                    *tarSrc = (((int)injInst + 5) + *injSrc) - ((int)tarInst + 5);
#else
                    Console.WriteLine("\nVersion x86 Release\n");
                    *tar = *inj;
#endif
                }
                else
                {

                    long* inj = (long*)methodToInject.MethodHandle.Value.ToPointer()+1;
                    long* tar = (long*)methodToReplace.MethodHandle.Value.ToPointer()+1;
#if DEBUG
                    Console.WriteLine("\nVersion x64 Debug\n");
                    byte* injInst = (byte*)*inj;
                    byte* tarInst = (byte*)*tar;


                    int* injSrc = (int*)(injInst + 1);
                    int* tarSrc = (int*)(tarInst + 1);

                    *tarSrc = (((int)injInst + 5) + *injSrc) - ((int)tarInst + 5);
#else
                    Console.WriteLine("\nVersion x64 Release\n");
                    *tar = *inj;
#endif
                }
            }
        }

        private void injectionMethod1()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Injection.injectionMethod1");
        }

        private string injectionMethod2()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Injection.injectionMethod2");
            return "Injected 2";
        }

        private void injectionMethod3(string text)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Injection.injectionMethod3 " + text);
        }

        private void injectionMethod4()
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Process.Start("calc");
        }
    }

}
  • 12
    This deserves so many more upvotes. I have a completely different scenario but this snippet is exactly what I needed to set me in the right direction. Thanks. – S.C. Apr 15 '16 at 18:32
  • 2
    @AlexZhukovskiy if you like post it on stack and send me link. I will look into it and give you an answer after weekend. Machine I will look also into your question after weekend. – Logman Aug 5 '16 at 10:07
  • 1
    Two things I noticed when doing this for an integration test with MSTest: (1) When you use this inside injectionMethod*() it will reference an Injection instance during compile time, but a Target instance during runtime (this is true for all references to instance members you use inside an injected method). (2) For some reason the #DEBUG part was only working when debugging a test, but not when running a test that has been debug-compiled. I ended up always using the #else part. I don't understand why this works but it does. – Good Night Nerd Pride Sep 7 '16 at 11:54
  • 2
    very nice. time to break everything ! @GoodNightNerdPride use Debugger.IsAttached instead of #if preprocessor – M.kazem Akhgary Dec 25 '16 at 16:01
  • 2
    @Logman When injecting methods created with Reflection.Emit.MethodBuilder, throws AccessViolationException in debug mode (works in release). Any thoughts? – Mr Anderson Jan 19 '17 at 5:52

Harmony is an open source library designed to replace, decorate or modify existing C# methods of any kind during runtime. It main focus is games and plugins written in Mono but the technique can be used with any .NET version. It also takes care of multiple changes to the same method (they accumulate instead of overwrite).

It creates methods of type DynamicMethod for every original method and emits code to it that calls custom methods at the start and end. It also allows you to write filters to process the original IL code which allows for more detailed manipulation of the original method.

To complete the process, it writes a simple assembler jump into the trampoline of the original method that points to the assembler generated from compiling the dynamic method. This works for 32/64Bit on Windows, macOS and any Linux that Mono supports.

  • Great work Andreas +1 – ppumkin Sep 20 at 19:43

You CAN modify a method's content at runtime. But you're not supposed to, and it's strongly recommended to keep that for test purposes.

Just have a look at:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/463508/NET-CLR-Injection-Modify-IL-Code-during-Run-time

Basically, you can:

  1. Get IL method content via MethodInfo.GetMethodBody().GetILAsByteArray()
  2. Mess with these bytes.

    If you just wish to prepend or append some code, then just preprend/append opcodes you want (be careful about leaving stack clean, though)

    Here are some tips to "uncompile" existing IL:

    • Bytes returned are a sequence of IL instructions, followed by their arguments (if they have some - for instance, '.call' has one argument: the called method token, and '.pop' has none)
    • Correspondence between IL codes and bytes you find in the returned array may be found using OpCodes.YourOpCode.Value (which is the real opcode byte value as saved in your assembly)
    • Arguments appended after IL codes may have different sizes (from one to several bytes), depending on opcode called
    • You may find tokens that theses arguments are referring to via appropriate methods. For instance, if your IL contains ".call 354354" (coded as 28 00 05 68 32 in hexa, 28h=40 being '.call' opcode and 56832h=354354), corresponding called method can be found using MethodBase.GetMethodFromHandle(354354)
  3. Once modified, you IL byte array can be reinjected via InjectionHelper.UpdateILCodes(MethodInfo method, byte[] ilCodes) - see link mentioned above

    This is the "unsafe" part... It works well, but this consists in hacking internal CLR mechanisms...

  • 6
    Just to be pedantic, 354354 (0x00056832) is not a valid metadata token, the high-order byte should be 0x06 (MethodDef), 0x0A (MemberRef) or 0x2B (MethodSpec). Also, the metadata token should be written in little-endian byte order. Finally, the metadata token is module specific and MethodInfo.MetadataToken will return the token from the declaring module, making it unusable if you want to call a method not defined in the same module as the method you are modifying. – Brian Reichle Jan 2 '15 at 1:56
  • This is not working anymore. – Piotr Krankiewicz Oct 10 at 15:22

you can replace it if the method is non virtual, non generic, not in generic type, not inlined and on x86 plateform:

MethodInfo methodToReplace = ...
RuntimeHelpers.PrepareMetod(methodToReplace.MethodHandle);

var getDynamicHandle = Delegate.CreateDelegate(Metadata<Func<DynamicMethod, RuntimeMethodHandle>>.Type, Metadata<DynamicMethod>.Type.GetMethod("GetMethodDescriptor", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic)) as Func<DynamicMethod, RuntimeMethodHandle>;

var newMethod = new DynamicMethod(...);
var body = newMethod.GetILGenerator();
body.Emit(...) // do what you want.
body.Emit(OpCodes.jmp, methodToReplace);
body.Emit(OpCodes.ret);

var handle = getDynamicHandle(newMethod);
RuntimeHelpers.PrepareMethod(handle);

*((int*)new IntPtr(((int*)methodToReplace.MethodHandle.Value.ToPointer() + 2)).ToPointer()) = handle.GetFunctionPointer().ToInt32();

//all call on methodToReplace redirect to newMethod and methodToReplace is called in newMethod and you can continue to debug it, enjoy.
  • That looks crazy dangerous. I really hope nobody uses it in production code. – Brian Reichle Jan 2 '15 at 2:07
  • 1
    Such this is used by application performance monitoring (APM) tools and is used in production as well. – Martin Kersten Sep 17 '15 at 23:29
  • 1
    Thank you for reply, i am working on a project to offer this kind of capability as Aspect Oriented Programming API. I resolved my limitation to manage virtual method and generic method on both x86 & x64. Let me know if you need more details. – Teter28 Sep 18 '15 at 12:26
  • 6
    What is the class Metadata? – Sebastian Sep 20 '16 at 7:04
  • This answer is pseudo code and outdated. Many of the methods no longer exist. – N-ate Dec 12 '17 at 1:18

Logman's solution, but with an interface for swapping method bodies. Also, a simpler example.

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;

namespace DynamicMojo
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Animal kitty = new HouseCat();
            Animal lion = new Lion();
            var meow = typeof(HouseCat).GetMethod("Meow", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
            var roar = typeof(Lion).GetMethod("Roar", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);

            Console.WriteLine("<==(Normal Run)==>");
            kitty.MakeNoise(); //HouseCat: Meow.
            lion.MakeNoise(); //Lion: Roar!

            Console.WriteLine("<==(Dynamic Mojo!)==>");
            DynamicMojo.SwapMethodBodies(meow, roar);
            kitty.MakeNoise(); //HouseCat: Roar!
            lion.MakeNoise(); //Lion: Meow.

            Console.WriteLine("<==(Normality Restored)==>");
            DynamicMojo.SwapMethodBodies(meow, roar);
            kitty.MakeNoise(); //HouseCat: Meow.
            lion.MakeNoise(); //Lion: Roar!

            Console.Read();
        }
    }

    public abstract class Animal
    {
        public void MakeNoise() => Console.WriteLine($"{this.GetType().Name}: {GetSound()}");

        protected abstract string GetSound();
    }

    public sealed class HouseCat : Animal
    {
        protected override string GetSound() => Meow();

        private string Meow() => "Meow.";
    }

    public sealed class Lion : Animal
    {
        protected override string GetSound() => Roar();

        private string Roar() => "Roar!";
    }

    public static class DynamicMojo
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Swaps the function pointers for a and b, effectively swapping the method bodies.
        /// </summary>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentException">
        /// a and b must have same signature
        /// </exception>
        /// <param name="a">Method to swap</param>
        /// <param name="b">Method to swap</param>
        public static void SwapMethodBodies(MethodInfo a, MethodInfo b)
        {
            if (!HasSameSignature(a, b))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("a and b must have have same signature");
            }

            RuntimeHelpers.PrepareMethod(a.MethodHandle);
            RuntimeHelpers.PrepareMethod(b.MethodHandle);

            unsafe
            {
                if (IntPtr.Size == 4)
                {
                    int* inj = (int*)b.MethodHandle.Value.ToPointer() + 2;
                    int* tar = (int*)a.MethodHandle.Value.ToPointer() + 2;

                    byte* injInst = (byte*)*inj;
                    byte* tarInst = (byte*)*tar;

                    int* injSrc = (int*)(injInst + 1);
                    int* tarSrc = (int*)(tarInst + 1);

                    int tmp = *tarSrc;
                    *tarSrc = (((int)injInst + 5) + *injSrc) - ((int)tarInst + 5);
                    *injSrc = (((int)tarInst + 5) + tmp) - ((int)injInst + 5);
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new NotImplementedException($"{nameof(SwapMethodBodies)} doesn't yet handle IntPtr size of {IntPtr.Size}");
                }
            }
        }

        private static bool HasSameSignature(MethodInfo a, MethodInfo b)
        {
            bool sameParams = !a.GetParameters().Any(x => !b.GetParameters().Any(y => x == y));
            bool sameReturnType = a.ReturnType == b.ReturnType;
            return sameParams && sameReturnType;
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    This gave me: An exception of type 'System.AccessViolationException' occurred in MA.ELCalc.FunctionalTests.dll but was not handled in user code Additional information: Attempted to read or write protected memory. This is often an indication that other memory is corrupt.,,,When replacing a getter. – N-ate Dec 12 '17 at 0:18

I know it is not the exact answer to your question, but the usual way to do it is using factories/proxy approach.

First we declare a base type.

public class SimpleClass
{
    public virtual DTask<bool> Solve(int n, DEvent<bool> callback)
    {
        for (int m = 2; m < n - 1; m += 1)
            if (m % n == 0)
                return false;
        return true;
    }
}

Then we can declare a derived type (call it proxy).

public class DistributedClass
{
    public override DTask<bool> Solve(int n, DEvent<bool> callback)
    {
        CodeToExecuteBefore();
        return base.Slove(n, callback);
    }
}

// At runtime

MyClass myInstance;

if (distributed)
    myInstance = new DistributedClass();
else
    myInstance = new SimpleClass();

The derived type can be also generated at runtime.

public static class Distributeds
{
    private static readonly ConcurrentDictionary<Type, Type> pDistributedTypes = new ConcurrentDictionary<Type, Type>();

    public Type MakeDistributedType(Type type)
    {
        Type result;
        if (!pDistributedTypes.TryGetValue(type, out result))
        {
            if (there is at least one method that have [Distributed] attribute)
            {
                result = create a new dynamic type that inherits the specified type;
            }
            else
            {
                result = type;
            }

            pDistributedTypes[type] = result;
        }
        return result;
    }

    public T MakeDistributedInstance<T>()
        where T : class
    {
        Type type = MakeDistributedType(typeof(T));
        if (type != null)
        {
            // Instead of activator you can also register a constructor delegate generated at runtime if performances are important.
            return Activator.CreateInstance(type);
        }
        return null;
    }
}

// In your code...

MyClass myclass = Distributeds.MakeDistributedInstance<MyClass>();
myclass.Solve(...);

The only performance loss is during construction of the derived object, the first time is quite slow because it will use a lot of reflection and reflection emit. All other times, it is the cost of a concurrent table lookup and a constructor. As said, you can optimize construction using

ConcurrentDictionary<Type, Func<object>>.
  • Hmm.. that still requires work on the programmer's behalf to actively be aware of the distributed processing; I was looking for a solution that relies only on them setting the [Distributed] attribute on the method (and not subclassing or inheriting from ContextBoundObject). Looks like I might need to do some post-compiling modifications on the assemblies using Mono.Cecil or something like that. – June Rhodes Sep 4 '11 at 22:15

You can replace a method at runtime by using the ICLRPRofiling Interface.

  1. Call AttachProfiler to attach to the process.
  2. Call SetILFunctionBody to replace the method code.

See this blog for more details.

There exists a couple of frameworks that allows you to dynamically change any method at runtime (they use the ICLRProfiling interface mentioned by user152949):

There are also a few frameworks that mocks around with the internals of .NET, these are likely more fragile, and probably can't change inlined code, but on the other hand they are fully self-contained and does not require you to use a custom launcher.

  • Harmony: MIT licensed. Seems to actually have been used sucessfully in a few game mods, supports both .NET and Mono.
  • Deviare In Process Instrumentation Engine: GPLv3 and Commercial. .NET support currently marked as experimental, but on the other hand has the benefit of being commercially backed.

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