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I have the following structures :

Inductive instr : Set :=
 | Select    : nat -> instr
 | Backspace : instr.

Definition prog := list instr.

and the following function:

Fixpoint Forward (input output: list nat) : option prog :=
match input with
  | nil => match output with
                 | nil => Some nil
                 | y::r => None
           end
  | x::rest => match output with
                | nil => match rest with
                            | nil => None   
                            | xx::rrest => match (Forward rrest nil) with
                                                            | Some pp => Some ((Select x) :: Backspace :: pp)
                                                            | None => None
                                           end
                         end
                | y::r => if ( beq_nat x y ) then match (Forward rest r) with
                                                   | Some pp => Some ((Select x) :: pp)
                                                   | None => None 
                                                   end
                          else match rest with
                                             | nil => None
                                             | xx::rrest => match (Forward rrest output) with
                                                                           | Some pp => Some ((Select x) :: Backspace :: pp)
                                                                           | None => None                                                                          
                                                            end
                                end

                end
end.

Now I'd like to prove this simple Lemma:

Lemma app_forward :
  forall (p p':prog) (input1 input2 output:list nat),
    Forward input1 output = Some p ->
        Forward input2 nil = Some p' ->
           Forward (input1 ++ input2) output = Some (p++p').

Note : As mentioned in the answer bellow, the more general form of the lemma is false:

Lemma not_app_forward :
  forall (p p':prog) (input1 input2 output1 output2:list nat),
    Forward input1 output1 = Some p ->
        Forward input2 output2 = Some p' ->
           Forward (input1 ++ input2) (output1 ++ output2) = Some (p++p').

Whatever induction principle I use, I'm stuck.

For example, I've tried this induction pattern:

Definition list_pair_induction {A : Type} :
  forall (P : list A -> Prop),
    P nil ->
    (forall a, P (a :: nil)) ->
    (forall a b tl, P tl -> P (a :: b :: tl)) ->
  forall l, P l.
Proof.
intros P Pn P1 Prec.
fix tsli 1.
intros [ | x l].
  exact Pn.
  generalize (tsli l).
  destruct l as [ | y tl]; intros Pl.
    exact (P1 x).
  apply Prec. exact (tsli tl).
Defined.

But I didn't manage to finalize the proof. There must be something obvious I don't see. Can't someone help me with this proof ?

Thank you !!

1 Answer 1

1

There are two problems with your question. The first one is that the statement you want to prove is false, here is a proof of a counter example.

Lemma not_app_forward :
    not
      (forall (p p':prog) (input1 input2 output1 output2:list nat),
        Forward input1 output1 = Some p ->
            Forward input2 output2 = Some p' ->
               Forward (input1 ++ input2) (output1 ++ output2) = Some (p++p')).
Proof. 
intros abs.
assert (tmp := abs (Select 1 :: Backspace :: nil) (Select 1 :: Select 2 :: nil)
                   (1 :: 2 :: nil) (1 :: 2 :: nil) nil (1 :: 2 :: nil) refl_equal refl_equal).
compute in tmp.
discriminate.
Qed.

So, contrary to your claim, this is not a simple lemma.

The second problem is that the function has a complicated shape and the proof by induction is difficult to organize. I cover this aspect just below.

From the structure of the function Forward, it is natural that you should perform your proof by induction over the input argument, because it is the argument where recursive calls occur on a subterm. However the proof is made complicated by the fact that recursive calls happen not only on direct subterms (as in Forward rest ...) but also in subterms of subterms (as in Forward rrest ...).

There are several ways out of this difficulty, but all require some amount of explanation or learning.

1 - One way is to use the Equations plugin to Coq and redefine your Forward function using Equations. You can then use functional induction to solve your problem: this will use an induction principle that especially tailored to your problem.

2 - A second way is to build a tailored induction principle by hand. Here is an attempt.

Definition two_step_list_induction {A : Type} :
  forall (P : list A -> Prop),
    P nil ->
    (forall a, P (a :: nil)) ->
    (forall a b tl, 
        P (b :: tl) -> P tl -> P (a :: b :: tl)) ->
  forall l, P l.
Proof.
intros P Pn P1 Prec.
fix tsli 1.
intros [ | x l].
  exact Pn.
  generalize (tsli l).
  destruct l as [ | y tl]; intros Pl.
    exact (P1 x).
  apply Prec;[assumption | exact (tsli tl)].
Defined.

You can then start your proof with a command of the following shape:

Lemma app_forward :
  forall (p p':prog) (input1 input2 output1 output2:list nat),
    Forward input1 output1 = Some p ->
        Forward input2 output2 = Some p' ->
           Forward (input1 ++ input2) (output1 ++ output2) = Some (p++p').
Proof.
intros p p' input1; revert p; induction input1 as [ | a | a b tl Ih1 Ih2]
  using two_step_list_induction.

But, as I already said, the lemma you want to prove is actually false, so there is no way this proof will ever work and I cannot illustrate that the proposed approach is going to work.

EDIT: Now that the original question has been corrected, here is a full correction to the original question:

Lemma app_forward : forall (p p':prog) (input1 input2 output:list nat),
Forward input1 output = Some p ->
    Forward input2 nil = Some p' ->
       Forward (input1 ++ input2) output = Some (p++p').
Proof.
intros p p' input1; revert p; induction input1 as [ | x | x xx rrest Ih1 Ih2]
  using two_step_list_induction.
simpl.
* intros p input2 [ | no1 output].
  + intros [= p_is_nil ]; rewrite <- p_is_nil; simpl; auto.
  + discriminate.
* simpl.
  destruct output as [ | y r]; simpl; try discriminate.
  destruct (x =? y); try discriminate.
  destruct r as [ | no12 output1]; simpl; try discriminate.
  now intros [= pval] v2; rewrite <- pval, v2; simpl.
* intros p input2 output.
  destruct output as [ | y r].
    simpl (Forward (x :: xx :: rrest) nil).
    destruct (Forward rrest nil) as [v | ] eqn:vtl; try discriminate.
    intros [= pval] p'val.
    assert(tmp := Ih2 _ _ _ vtl p'val).
    simpl.
    rewrite tmp, <- pval.
    easy.
  change (Forward (x :: xx :: rrest) (y :: r)) with
      (if x =? y then match Forward (xx :: rrest) r with
                     | Some pp => Some (Select x :: pp)
                     | None => None end
      else match Forward rrest (y :: r) with
           | Some pp => Some (Select x :: Backspace :: pp)
           | None => None
           end).
  destruct (Forward (xx :: rrest) r) as [vrest | ] eqn:eqnrest.
    destruct (x =? y) eqn:xeqy.
      intros [= vp ] v2; rewrite <- vp; clear vp.
      generalize (Ih1 _ _ _ eqnrest v2); simpl.
      rewrite xeqy; intros it; rewrite it.
      easy.
    destruct (Forward rrest (y :: r)) as [v | ] eqn:eqnrrest; try discriminate.
    intros [= vp] v2; rewrite <- vp; clear vp.
    simpl; rewrite xeqy, (Ih2 _ _ _ eqnrrest v2).
    easy.
  destruct (x =? y) eqn:xeqy; try discriminate.
  destruct (Forward rrest (y :: r)) as [v | ] eqn:eqnrrest; try discriminate.
  intros [= vp] v2; rewrite <- vp; clear vp.
  simpl.
  rewrite xeqy, (Ih2 _ _ _ eqnrrest v2).
  easy.
Qed.

A few comments on this solution:

  • The code posted in the original function contains 3 recursive calls, one where the argument is the immediate sublist (rest) and 2 where the argument is the second sublist (rest). The first one is handled by induction hypothesis Ih1 and the other are handled by induction hypothesis Ih2. For a reason I have no time to investigate, my proof needs 4 uses of induction hypotheses instead of 3. This means that there is probably some duplication.
  • sometimes, the simpl tactic is too eager to unroll the recursive definition until it can no longer do anything. To counterbalance this bias of the simpl tactic, I had to perform one of the unrolling steps by hand, without relying on simpl. This unrolling step is performed by the change tactic call that appears in the middle of the script.
  • everytime that there is a recursive call in your function, the result is later analyized by a match construct. To account for this, the proof perform case analysis on the results of recursive calls and uses the destruct ... eqn:... variant of the destruct tactic to perform this analysis.
  • Aside from these advanced techniques, the proof is just guided by the interaction with Coq.

This proof script was verified with coq-8.15 with the List and ZArith modules imported.

3 - You can avoid constructing a tailored induction principle by relying on much more powerful well founded induction. This will give you a more general induction hypothesis, which can be used for a much wider set of recursive arguments (even arguments that are not structural subterms of the initial first list). Here is the full script:

Require Import Wellfounded.

Lemma app_forward2 : forall (p p':prog) (input1 input2 output:list nat),
Forward input1 output = Some p ->
    Forward input2 nil = Some p' ->
       Forward (input1 ++ input2) output = Some (p++p').
Proof.
intros p p' input1; revert p.
induction input1 as [input1 Ih] using
      (well_founded_ind
          (wf_inverse_image (list nat) nat lt (@length nat) lt_wf)).
 destruct input1 as [ | x [ | xx rrest]] eqn:input1eq.                 
* intros p input2 [ | no1 output].
  + intros [= p_is_nil ]; rewrite <- p_is_nil; simpl; auto.
  + discriminate.
* simpl.
  destruct output as [ | y r]; simpl; try discriminate.
  destruct (x =? y); try discriminate.
  destruct r as [ | no12 output1]; simpl; try discriminate.
  now intros [= pval] v2; rewrite <- pval, v2; simpl.
* intros p input2 output.
  assert (rrestlt : length rrest < length (x :: xx :: rrest)).
    now simpl; auto with arith.
  assert (restlt : length (xx :: rrest) < length (x :: xx :: rrest)).
    now simpl; auto with arith.
  destruct output as [ | y r].
    simpl (Forward (x :: xx :: rrest) nil).
    destruct (Forward rrest nil) as [v | ] eqn:vtl; try discriminate.
    intros [= pval] p'val.
    assert (tmp := Ih _ rrestlt _ _ _ vtl p'val).
    simpl.
    rewrite tmp, <- pval.
    easy.
  change (Forward (x :: xx :: rrest) (y :: r)) with
      (if x =? y then match Forward (xx :: rrest) r with
                     | Some pp => Some (Select x :: pp)
                     | None => None end
      else match Forward rrest (y :: r) with
           | Some pp => Some (Select x :: Backspace :: pp)
           | None => None
           end).
  destruct (Forward (xx :: rrest) r) as [vrest | ] eqn:eqnrest.
    destruct (x =? y) eqn:xeqy.
      intros [= vp ] v2; rewrite <- vp; clear vp.
      generalize (Ih _ restlt _ _ _ eqnrest v2); simpl.
      rewrite xeqy; intros it; rewrite it.
      easy.
    destruct (Forward rrest (y :: r)) as [v | ] eqn:eqnrrest; try discriminate.
    intros [= vp] v2; rewrite <- vp; clear vp.
    simpl; rewrite xeqy, (Ih _ rrestlt _ _ _ eqnrrest v2).
    easy.
  destruct (x =? y) eqn:xeqy; try discriminate.
  destruct (Forward rrest (y :: r)) as [v | ] eqn:eqnrrest; try discriminate.
  intros [= vp] v2; rewrite <- vp; clear vp.
  simpl.
  rewrite xeqy, (Ih _ rrestlt _ _ _ eqnrrest v2).
  easy.
Qed.

A careful scrutiny of the script for lemma app_forward2 shows that the script is almost the same as for app_forward. Three main hints:

  • well_founded_induction combined with wf_inverse_image length and lt_wf gives a general induction hypothesis that can be use for every case where input1 is replaced with a list that is shorter in length.

  • destruct input1 replaces every instance of input1 with a variety of cases, including the instance that appears in the induction hypothesis.

  • all calls to induction hypotheses Ih1 and Ih2 in the previous solution have simply been replaced by calls to Ih, using hypotheses restlt and rrestlt to guarantee length decrease.

7
  • Yes my mistake, sorry. There is no output2 in the valid lemma. I've changed the question accordingly.
    – FH35
    Jul 21 at 6:53
  • I edited the answer accordingly.
    – Yves
    Jul 21 at 13:16
  • Thank you very much ! The trick seems to be that your induction is really tailored to the function (with the ih1 hypothesis from the P(b::tl) -> part of the induction) , that I could not use with my list_pair_induction pattern (I've edited the question again above to make this clear). You suggest that Equation is the way to sort of automate this ? Where can I learn how the module works ?
    – FH35
    Jul 22 at 7:03
  • Actually, I just remembered that there is yet another way to give yourself an induction principle that is powerful enough: use well_founded_induction Nat.lt, comparing strings by their length. You don't need to build a custom induction principle, you will only need to : use destruct .. eqn:.. more intensively during the proof and to show that length rrest < length (x :: xx :: rrest) and length rest < length (x :: rest). I have other things to do just now, but I will edit the answer to show that in a few hours or days (hopefully).
    – Yves
    Jul 22 at 7:51
  • For the Equations plugin, you can use a web search engine with strings "coq equations" and then look for tutorials on this plugin.
    – Yves
    Jul 22 at 7:52

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