-3

There we go again. RegEx. The most mysterious thing on this planet.

I have lots of LUA tables as .lua files

local tbl = {
   SomeObject = {
      Key = "Value",
      AnotherKey = {
         Key1 = "Value 1",
         Key2 = "Value 2",
         Key3 = "Value 3",
      }
   },
   AnotherObject = {
      Key = "Value",
      AnotherKey = {
         Key1 = "Value 1",
         Key2 = "Value 2",
         Key3 = "Value 3",
      }
   }
}

I would like to convert these files to JSON so they can be used more easily across different applications. Is there any fancy RegEx I could use in C# e.g. to convert them?

2
  • 1
    You can't. Lua scripts, even when used only for configuration, are not Regular Languages, therefore you cannot parse them using regular-expressions.
    – Dai
    Jul 19 at 11:33
  • This can't be done (or maybe could via a complete hack) with regular expressions. The best way to convert the code to JSON is to parse the code with an Antlr parser from the lua grammar, then use either a parse tree visitor or a template engine to make the translation. The grammar works fine on your code.
    – kaby76
    Jul 19 at 20:38

1 Answer 1

4

In general: No. RegEx is incapable of parsing Lua since parsing requires a context-free grammar (CFG). At a tokenization level, RegEx might suffice though; the main difference between Lua table constructors for your example is that JSON uses "key": value whereas Lua uses ["key"] = value or key = value if key is a valid identifier (which seems to be the only case in your example). Replacing ([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z0-9_])%s= with "$1": where $1 is the first capture should thus work, assuming you don't have this in your string keys...

I would strongly recommend against using RegEx. The simplest & most reliable way to go about this however is to execute these files as Lua code, then write the Lua tables to JSON from inside Lua. Also make sure to sandbox the environment in which you load these files properly.

4
  • "execute these files as Lua code" <-- There are significant logistics and security issues if one were to choose this approach though...
    – Dai
    Jul 19 at 11:34
  • @Dai logistics? I don't think the OPs input is user-provided, so security shouldn't be that big a concern. The only proper way to turn a program code abused as object notation into data structures unfortunately is to execute it (unless the code is limited to a subset that practically is an object notation, but that's not apparent from the question). The OP can use Luon next time ;)
    – LMD
    Jul 19 at 11:39
  • By "logistics" I meant the possibility of having to keep a working Lua environment around just for the sake of reading a single config file.
    – Dai
    Jul 19 at 11:42
  • @Dai right, but libraries for C# (I'm thinking the horribly outdated Moonsharp here) exist.
    – LMD
    Jul 19 at 11:43

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