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I generated 1000 output files containing a single line with (mistakenly) no line break at the end, so that

cat filnename_* > outfile

generates a file with a single line. I attempted to remedy this using

cat filename_* | tr '\n' ' ' > outfile

but I get exactly the same result - a file with a single line of output. Why doesn't the latter code (which ought to add a line break for each filename_* file) accomplish what I'm trying to do?

6
  • Is there some straightforward way to introduce a '\n' at the end of each line (file) in cat so that I will get an output file with 1000 lines from each?
    – Max
    Jul 25 at 13:46
  • Is there a way to do this within cat?
    – Max
    Jul 25 at 13:51
  • only thing I can think of would be a custom function; see 2nd half of my answer
    – markp-fuso
    Jul 25 at 14:00
  • 2
    You can intersperse the filenames on the command line with a name that, when read, returns only a single newline. Is that "within cat" for your purposes? Jul 25 at 14:06
  • To be clear, if your input files were in valid UNIX text format none of this would be necessary, because all lines in UNIX including the last one are required to have training newlines for the file to be considered text by the letter of the standard. So there's no reason for cat to include special functionality for this; if it's given correctly formed input the problem never happens. Jul 25 at 14:07

3 Answers 3

2

I think you could manually append a line break to your 1000 out files, and then cat them all later:

echo | tee -a filename_*
cat filnename_* > outfile

Edit: Change the first step to echo | tee -a filename_* as @rowboat suggested

1
  • 1
    echo emits a single line break called with no arguments at all. echo -e '\n' emits two if you're lucky, or the string -e followed by a space and then a newline if you're unlucky. (Read the APPLICATION USAGE section of the POSIX spec for echo for context; bash has several different ways its copy of echo can be configured at either compile time or runtime to let it comply with that standard) Jul 25 at 14:15
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If all your files are missing the final linefeed then you can use sed for adding it on the fly:

# with GNU sed
sed '$s/$/\n/' filnename_* > outfile

# with standard sed and bash, zsh, etc...
sed $'$s/$/\\\n/' filnename_* > outfile

# with standard sed and a POSIX shell
sed '$s/$/\
/' filnename_* > outfile
0

tr '\n' ' ' says to replace each \n with a space; you've already stated the inputs do not contain any \n so the tr does nothing and the final output is just a copy of the input

Setup:

for ((i=1;i<=5;i++))
do
    printf 'abcd' > out${i}
done

$ cat out*
abcdabcdabcdabcdabcd

Many commands can process a file and add a \n, it just depends on how much typing you want to do, eg:

$ sed 's/$/&/' out*      # or: sed -n '/$/p' out*
abcd
abcd
abcd
abcd
abcd

$ awk '1' out*
abcd
abcd
abcd
abcd
abcd

I'm not coming up with any ideas on how to use cat to append a \n but one idea would be to use a user-defined function; assume we want to name our new function catn (cat and add \n on end):

$ type -a catn                           # verify name "catn" not currently in use
-bash: type: catn: not found

$ catn() { awk '1' "${@:--}"; }          # wrap function definition around the awk solution

$ catn out*  
abcd
abcd
abcd
abcd
abcd

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