62

When I use "cat test.file", it will show

1
 2
  3
   4

When I use the Bash file,

cat test.file |
while read data
do
    echo "$data"
done

It will show

1
2
3
4

How could I make the result just like the original test file?

  • One can find useful script-line to prepend line numbers to stdio: { i=0; while read; do i=$(dc 1 $i + p); printf "%4 d $REPLY\n" $i; done; } It is compatible with old SH. – kyb Apr 19 '19 at 12:09
101
IFS=''
cat test.file |
while read data
do
    echo "$data"
done

I realize you might have simplified the example from something that really needed a pipeline, but before someone else says it:

IFS=''
while read data; do
    echo "$data"
done < test.file
  • 1
    Because the script is reading into a single variable per line, any spaces within the data (after the first non-blank) are preserved regardless. But the empty IFS preserves the leading spaces (in ksh and bash). – Jonathan Leffler Sep 6 '11 at 2:50
  • 24
    This is a place where you could write while IFS= read data; ... – glenn jackman Sep 6 '11 at 10:57
  • @glennjackman I was starting to try export IFS..., good I read you tip! – Aquarius Power Nov 15 '14 at 20:12
  • 8
    You might want to use IFS= read -r line to avoid interpretation of backslashes. – Lekensteyn Dec 20 '14 at 13:16
23

Actually, if you don't supply an argument to the "read" call, read will set a default variable called $REPLY which will preserve whitespace. So you can just do this:

$ cat test.file | while read; do echo "$REPLY"; done
  • 1
    This answer prompted me to closely read the documentation for read. – David Cullen Aug 15 '16 at 14:41
  • 2
    Note that if you have any backslash-escaped characters like \n in your source file (i.e. source code), read will convert them to just n. Use read -r to prevent this. – jdgregson Feb 9 '18 at 22:11
  • 1
    Note that this $REPLY solution doesn't work in ZSH, but the IFS= read solution works in both ZSH and Bash. – ntc2 Feb 28 '19 at 3:24
3

Just to complement DigitalRoss's response.

For that case that you want to alter the IFS just for this command, you can use curly braces. If you do, the value of IFS will be changed only inside the block. Like this:

echo '
  word1
  word2' |  { IFS='' ; while read line ; do echo "$line" check ; done ; }

The output will be (keeping spaces):

  word1 check
  word2 check
  • Even though the unset IFS already salvages this particular example, you should still quote "$line". In a real world example, the value could still contain shell wildcards and what not. – tripleee Jun 12 '15 at 9:11
  • Wrong, so downvoted! Use IFS='' read -r line instead! In your example the Pipe runs the {..} in a subshell! Like IFS=' '; ( IFS='' ); echo "=$IFS=" which prints = = (note the SPC). In contrast IFS=' '; { IFS=''; }; echo "=$IFS=" prints == (IFS from within {..}). However I'd rather recommend: fullread() { local IFS=''; read -r $1; } or IFS='' read -r line (there is no ;' between IFS=''` and read. In shells VAR=val cmd args.. is how you alter the environment for just one command (this works for builtins like read, too). – Tino Aug 24 '19 at 18:05
  • I'm not sure I follow, Tino. Try cat -etv <<<"$IFS" ; echo word1 | { IFS=''; cat -etv <<<"$IFS" ; } ; cat -etv <<<"$IFS" ;. The subshell didn't change the IFS outside the block as I expected. Can you elaborate? – diogovk Aug 24 '19 at 23:05
1

read data will split the data by IFS, which is typically " \t\n". This will preserve the blanks for you:

var=$(cat test.file)
echo "$var"
1

Maybe IFS is the key point as others said. You need to add only IFS= between while and read.

cat test.file | 
while IFS= read data 
 do echo "$data"
 done

and do not forget quotations of $data, else echo will trim the spaces.

But as Joshua Davies mentioned, you would prefer to use the predefined variable $REPLY.

0

Alternatively, use a good file parsing tool, like AWK:

awk '{
  # Do your stuff
  print 
}' file

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