280

I have some pages with forms in my application.

How can I secure the form in such a way that if someone navigates away or closes the browser tab, they should be prompted to to confirm they really want to leave the form with unsaved data?

14 Answers 14

488

Short, wrong answer:

You can do this by handling the beforeunload event and returning a non-null string:

window.addEventListener("beforeunload", function (e) {
    var confirmationMessage = 'It looks like you have been editing something. '
                            + 'If you leave before saving, your changes will be lost.';

    (e || window.event).returnValue = confirmationMessage; //Gecko + IE
    return confirmationMessage; //Gecko + Webkit, Safari, Chrome etc.
});

The problem with this approach is that submitting a form is also firing the unload event. This is fixed easily by adding the a flag that you're submitting a form:

var formSubmitting = false;
var setFormSubmitting = function() { formSubmitting = true; };

window.onload = function() {
    window.addEventListener("beforeunload", function (e) {
        if (formSubmitting) {
            return undefined;
        }

        var confirmationMessage = 'It looks like you have been editing something. '
                                + 'If you leave before saving, your changes will be lost.';

        (e || window.event).returnValue = confirmationMessage; //Gecko + IE
        return confirmationMessage; //Gecko + Webkit, Safari, Chrome etc.
    });
};

Then calling the setter when submitting:

<form method="post" onsubmit="setFormSubmitting()">     
    <input type="submit" />
</form>

But read on...

Long, correct answer:

You also don't want to show this message when the user hasn't changed anything on your forms. One solution is to use the beforeunload event in combination with a "dirty" flag, which only triggers the prompt if it's really relevant.

var isDirty = function() { return false; }

window.onload = function() {
    window.addEventListener("beforeunload", function (e) {
        if (formSubmitting || !isDirty()) {
            return undefined;
        }

        var confirmationMessage = 'It looks like you have been editing something. '
                                + 'If you leave before saving, your changes will be lost.';

        (e || window.event).returnValue = confirmationMessage; //Gecko + IE
        return confirmationMessage; //Gecko + Webkit, Safari, Chrome etc.
    });
};

Now to implement the isDirty method, there are various approaches.

You can use jQuery and form serialization, but this approach has some flaws. First you have to alter the code to work on any form ($("form").each() will do), but the greatest problem is that jQuery's serialize() will only work on named, non-disabled elements, so changing any disabled or unnamed element will not trigger the dirty flag. There are workarounds for that, like making controls readonly instead of enabling, serializing and then disabling the controls again.

So events seem the way to go. You can try listening for keypresses. This event has a few issues:

  • Won't trigger on checkboxes, radio buttons, or other elements that are being altered through mouse input.
  • Will trigger for irrelevant keypresses like the Ctrl key.
  • Won't trigger on values set through JavaScript code.
  • Won't trigger on cutting or pasting text through context menus.
  • Won't work for virtual inputs like datepickers or checkbox/radiobutton beautifiers which save their value in a hidden input through JavaScript.

The change event also doesn't trigger on values set from JavaScript code, so also won't work for virtual inputs.

Binding the input event to all inputs (and textareas and selects) on your page won't work on older browsers and, like all event handling solutions mentioned above, doesn't support undo. When a user changes a textbox and then undoes that, or checks and unchecks a checkbox, the form is still considered dirty.

And when you want to implement more behavior, like ignoring certain elements, you'll have even more work to do.

Don't reinvent the wheel:

So before you think about implementing those solutions and all required workarounds, realize you're reinventing the wheel and you're prone to running into problems others have already solved for you.

If your application already uses jQuery, you may as well use tested, maintained code instead of rolling your own, and use a third-part library for all of this. jQuery's Are You Sure? plugin works great, see their demo page. It's as simple as this:

<script src="jquery.are-you-sure.js"></script>

<script>
  $(function() {
    $('#myForm').areYouSure(
      {
        message: 'It looks like you have been editing something. '
               + 'If you leave before saving, your changes will be lost.'
      }
    );
  });

</script>

Custom messages not supported everywhere

Do note that Firefox 4 didn't support custom messages in this dialog. As of last month, Chrome 51 is being rolled out in which custom messages are also being removed.

Some alternatives exist elsewhere on this site, but I think a dialog like this is clear enough:

Do you want to leave this site?

Changes you made may not be saved.

Leave Stay

  • 6
    Note that using custom strings doesn't work anymore in Chrome; chromestatus.com/feature/5349061406228480 – amann May 4 '17 at 12:58
  • 5
    Yes, that's described in the last section of my answer. – CodeCaster May 4 '17 at 13:00
  • 2
    @Chris that'll be because Angular is manipulating the DOM to change the page, while not navigating away from the current document. – CodeCaster May 4 '17 at 18:07
  • 10
    Be warned jQuery areYouSure has been abandoned since 2014 (57 open issues on Github) , it's full of bugs from my experience, it may seem like it works at first but after some quick tests I realised it doesn't always work. Would Not recommend this at all – Mark Jan 10 '18 at 21:38
  • 3
    @JacopoStanchi I unfortunately didn't find any. And I mean I looked quite a lot - but this was back in Jan 10 so someone may have written something but I doubt it. Your best bet is to implement it yourself - it's not what you want to hear tho so sorry. ( But at least you won't get any surprises like I did using jQuery areYouSure.) Plus who knows maybe you could even make it open source and your implementation would be shared with others ;) – Mark Jul 6 '18 at 14:38
72

Check out the JavaScript onbeforeunload event. It's non-standard JavaScript introduced by Microsoft, however it works in most browsers and their onbeforeunload documentation has more information and examples.

  • 1
    I think it is become standards now. >> The event was originally introduced by Microsoft in Internet Explorer 4 and standardized in the HTML5 specification. – vee Jul 9 '18 at 16:06
32

via jquery

$('#form').data('serialize',$('#form').serialize()); // On load save form current state

$(window).bind('beforeunload', function(e){
    if($('#form').serialize()!=$('#form').data('serialize'))return true;
    else e=null; // i.e; if form state change show warning box, else don't show it.
});

You can Google JQuery Form Serialize function, this will collect all form inputs and save it in array. I guess this explain is enough :)

8

Universal solution requiring no configuration that automatically detects all input modification, including contenteditable elements:

"use strict";
(() => {
const modified_inputs = new Set;
const defaultValue = "defaultValue";
// store default values
addEventListener("beforeinput", (evt) => {
    const target = evt.target;
    if (!(defaultValue in target || defaultValue in target.dataset)) {
        target.dataset[defaultValue] = ("" + (target.value || target.textContent)).trim();
    }
});
// detect input modifications
addEventListener("input", (evt) => {
    const target = evt.target;
    let original;
    if (defaultValue in target) {
        original = target[defaultValue];
    } else {
        original = target.dataset[defaultValue];
    }
    if (original !== ("" + (target.value || target.textContent)).trim()) {
        if (!modified_inputs.has(target)) {
            modified_inputs.add(target);
        }
    } else if (modified_inputs.has(target)) {
        modified_inputs.delete(target);
    }
});
addEventListener("beforeunload", (evt) => {
    if (modified_inputs.size) {
        const unsaved_changes_warning = "Changes you made may not be saved.";
        evt.returnValue = unsaved_changes_warning;
        return unsaved_changes_warning;
    }
});
})();
  • Cool beans. Just copy paste this code into your test page, make a change and hit refresh. It will display a native browser alert warning you that you have unsaved changes. – TheLegendaryCopyCoder Oct 9 '18 at 8:27
  • This worked for me on Chrome 71.0.3578.98 (Official Build) (64-bit) – JacobRossDev Jan 30 at 20:52
7

Based on the previous answers, and cobbled together from various places in stack overflow, here is the solution I came up with which handles the case when you actually want to submit your changes:

window.thisPage = window.thisPage || {};
window.thisPage.isDirty = false;

window.thisPage.closeEditorWarning = function (event) {
    if (window.thisPage.isDirty)
        return 'It looks like you have been editing something' +
               ' - if you leave before saving, then your changes will be lost.'
    else
        return undefined;
};

$("form").on('keyup', 'textarea', // You can use input[type=text] here as well.
             function () { 
                 window.thisPage.isDirty = true; 
             });

$("form").submit(function () {
    QC.thisPage.isDirty = false;
});
window.onbeforeunload = window.thisPage.closeEditorWarning;

It's worth noting that IE11 seems to require that the closeEditorWarning function returns undefined for it not to show an alert.

  • This solution does not verify that any values are changed from their original state, therefor invalidating in the case that the user inputs text and the deletes that inputted text before attempting to navigate away. – Brett Weber Apr 24 '14 at 22:41
  • Good point, @BrettWeber. You could modify closeEditorWarning in that case, and have "if (window.thisPage.isDirty && uiHasChanged())", where uiHasChanged is a function that knows about the original state from the server, and checks all differences, but this solution was for a case where I didn't particularly want to do all that extra work, and this only has false positives when actual keypresses have been made in the textareas, which I felt was a reasonable compromise. :) – Jonathan Apr 25 '14 at 14:27
  • Shouldn't QC.thisPage.isDirty = false; be window.thisPage.isDirty = false;? That way, it will check if you're submitting the form and not show a warning. Seemed to work for my tests. Also, most forms have an input rather than a textarea. I used the following which works rather well: $("form").on('keyup', 'textarea,input,select', function () { – Mike Jun 27 '17 at 10:12
6

The following one-liner has worked for me.

window.onbeforeunload = s => modified ? "" : null;

Just set modified to true or false depending on the state of your application.

  • 1
    Some suggestions: Return a custom message rather than an empty string as some browsers will display it (e.g. Edge), and return undefined rather than null as IE will print 'null' if modified is false. – Kevin Lee Jul 17 '17 at 5:50
  • how about mobile devices? my understanding is that IOS devices do not honor onbeforeunload. – jaybro Apr 10 '18 at 18:59
6

Built on top of Wasim A.'s excellent idea to use serialization. The problem there was that the warning was also shown when the form was being submitted. This has been fixed here.

var isSubmitting = false

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('form').submit(function(){
        isSubmitting = true
    })

    $('form').data('initial-state', $('form').serialize());

    $(window).on('beforeunload', function() {
        if (!isSubmitting && $('form').serialize() != $('form').data('initial-state')){
            return 'You have unsaved changes which will not be saved.'
        }
    });
})

It has been tested in Chrome and IE 11.

  • Wasim A and Eerik Sven Puudist - Thanks I used id for form and id for my save button as all my buttons were type submit <form action="" id="marksform" method="POST"> <td><input type="submit" name="submit_button" id="save" value="Save"></td> <td><input type="submit" name="submit_button" value="Next"></td> and few more all type submit Hence replaced .Submit( by specific click $('#save').click(function(){ isSubmitting = true }) Use '#marksform' instead of 'form' – Jayanta 20 hours ago
4

Following code works great. You need to reach your form elements' input changes via id attribute:

var somethingChanged=false;
            $('#managerForm input').change(function() { 
                somethingChanged = true; 
           }); 
            $(window).bind('beforeunload', function(e){
                if(somethingChanged)
                    return "You made some changes and it's not saved?";
                else 
                    e=null; // i.e; if form state change show warning box, else don't show it.
            });
        });
3
var unsaved = false;
$(":input").change(function () {         
    unsaved = true;
});

function unloadPage() {         
    if (unsaved) {             
        alert("You have unsaved changes on this page. Do you want to leave this page and discard your changes or stay on this page?");
    }
} 
window.onbeforeunload = unloadPage;
  • I inserted it in a separate file and I included it with <script src="warnOnChange.js"></script> but nothing happens when I modify a textfield and then I execute an header command. – Fabrizio Bartolomucci Dec 9 '14 at 10:42
  • doesn't work... – Sak Aug 1 '17 at 10:47
1

Adding to te idea of @codecaster you could add this to every page with a form (in my case i use it in global way so only on forms would have this warn) change his function to

if ( formSubmitting || document.getElementsByTagName('form').length == 0) 

Also put on forms submit including login and in cancel buttons links so when person press cancel or submit the form won't trigger the warn also in every page witouth a form...

<a class="btn btn-danger btn-md" href="back/url" onclick="setFormSubmitting()">Cancel</a>
1

You could check for a detailed explanation here: http://techinvestigations.redexp.in/comparison-of-form-values-on-load-and-before-close/ comparison-of-form-values-on-load-and-before-close

The main code:

function formCompare(defaultValues, valuesOnClose) {

    // Create arrays of property names
    var aPropsFormLoad = Object.keys(defaultValues);
    var aPropsFormClose = Object.keys(valuesOnClose);

    // If number of properties is different,
    // objects are not equivalent
    if (aPropsFormLoad.length != aPropsFormClose.length) {
        return false;
    }

    for (var i = 0; i < aPropsFormLoad.length; i++) {
        var propName = aPropsFormLoad[i];

        // If values of same property are not equal,
        // objects are not equivalent
        if (defaultValues[aPropsFormLoad]+"" !== valuesOnClose[aPropsFormLoad]+"") {
            return false;
        }
    }

    // If we made it this far, objects
    // are considered equivalent
    return true;

}

//add polyfill for older browsers, as explained on the link above

//use the block below on load
    for(i=0; i < document.forms[0].elements.length; i++){
    console.log("The field name is: " + document.forms[0].elements[i].name +
        " and it’s value is: " + document.forms[0].elements[i].value );
    aPropsFormLoad[i] = document.forms[0].elements[i].value;
    }

//create a similar array on window unload event.

//and call the utility function
    if (!formCompare(aPropsOnLoad, aPropsOnClose))
    {
    //perform action: 
    //ask user for confirmation or
    //display message about changes made
    }
1

Short answer:

let pageModified = true

window.addEventListener("beforeunload", 
  () => pageModified ? 'Close page without saving data?' : null
)
1

The solution by Eerik Sven Puudist ...

var isSubmitting = false;

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('form').submit(function(){
        isSubmitting = true
    })

    $('form').data('initial-state', $('form').serialize());

    $(window).on('beforeunload', function() {
        if (!isSubmitting && $('form').serialize() != $('form').data('initial-state')){
            return 'You have unsaved changes which will not be saved.'
        }
    });
})

... spontaneously did the job for me in a complex object-oriented setting without any changes necessary.

The only change I applied was to refer to the concrete form (only one form per file) called "formForm" ('form' -> '#formForm'):

<form ... id="formForm" name="formForm" ...>

Especially well done is the fact that the submit button is being "left alone".

Additionally, it works for me also with the lastest version of Firefox (as of February 7th, 2019).

-4

First of all, most browsers has this function by default. And why do you need this at all? Why not to keep the form synced? I mean, save it on any change without waiting any submitting from user. Like Google Contacts do. Of course if only all fields in form are mandatory. Users do not like when them force to fill something up without the opportunity to go away to think if they need it. :)

  • will you are right but my forms are generated dynamically and the fields are not in my control so for me it is not possible to trace all field and send request through ajax, if you have something in mind please share with me. – Khan Sep 9 '11 at 7:56
  • Okay it may not be necessary for your purposes but it is still able to be implemented. If the form elements are on the screen you can attach your own event handlers and get any data you want. Then use AJAX to save the data to where ever you like. Even if the forms have randomly generated IDs or class names, you can use XPaths if you can anticipate the form's structure. It's XML/HTML right? So you could even have a JAD with the people responsible for the dynamically generated form and talk about how XSTL could benefit you both on this project. Just a thought... – SimonDever May 24 '13 at 15:29
  • 1
    save it on any change without waiting any submitting from user You don't always want to do this. Sometimes the user wants to make many changes and then review and confirm that they want to save it. – BadHorsie Jan 28 '16 at 13:03
  • I didn't suggest to submit the form. The data could be saved in localStorage, in some cache or even be submitted with some draft flag. There are many methods for this behavior. It is much better than alerting user about that he didn't finished the form and if he won't and will close the window he will have to fill it up again next time. "Come on, man, don't be lazy, your train/bus/plane/etc. does not matter as well as we do not care that you forgot a charger from your laptop, just fill this damn form!" – YuS Jan 29 '16 at 12:42

protected by Aniket Thakur Dec 13 '17 at 4:35

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