15

Please suggest a ready-to-use tool for parsing C++ code into an abstract syntax tree? Lex/Yacc based tools would be preferred, but anything else would also be acceptable.

| |
  • 3
    Please don't lump C into this. Parsing C is relatively simple, and notably slightly different from parsing C++ (consider the following statement, legal in C++ but not C: (cond ? a : b) = 1;). They're not the same language, so choose only the one you really mean. – Chris Lutz Sep 6 '11 at 11:13
  • Agreed with @Chris Lutz, except that there are much better examples of problems in C++ parsing - see e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/1172939/… – user395760 Sep 6 '11 at 11:21
  • @delnan - I was more trying to illustrate the differences between parsing C and parsing C++. – Chris Lutz Sep 6 '11 at 11:24
  • I'd vote for clang, but if it is not appropriate for some reason, you could try Elsa: scottmcpeak.com/elkhound – SK-logic Sep 6 '11 at 12:59
  • @Ira - The question originally said "C/C++". Check the edit history. – Chris Lutz Sep 8 '11 at 5:02

10 Answers 10

9

You can look at gccxml. It dumps only the program structure, not the code, however.

If you want more than that, your best option is probably CLang.

Note that the C++ syntax cannot be parsed easily with only a Lex/Yacc parser. It is just too ambiguous.

| |
8

How about clang?

The goal of the Clang project is to create a new C, C++, Objective C and Objective C++ front-end for the LLVM compiler.

| |
  • 4
    Isn't that what rodrigo already suggested? – Bart Kiers Sep 6 '11 at 11:42
4

The option -fdump-translation-unit of the GCC compiler generates an abstract syntax tree for input files:

Dump a representation of the tree structure for the entire translation unit to a file. The file name is made by appending .tu to the source file name.

| |
4

Our DMS C++ Front End is a full-fledged C++11 parser with full name and type resolution. It parses C++ code, builds ASTs and symbol tables, and using its DMS Software Reengineering Toollkit can carry out arbitrary changes to the AST and regenerate valid code. It handles dialects of GCC, MS Visual Studio, and includes OpenMP.

DMS with the C++ Front End have been used to carry out massive changes on large systems of code.

EDIT June 2013: See this SO answer for examples of C++ ASTs produced by DMS.

EDIT June 2016: Handles C++14.

EDIT May 2019: Handles C++17

| |
2

TXL is used as the C++ parser embedded in a production commercial IDE that has sold hundreds of thousands of copies. So the question of whether TXL can do it is a non-issue.

However, the TXL grammar used in that product is proprietary, and not publicly available. The free C++ grammar provided on the TXL website has been used in many large scale C++ renovation projects, as Audrey154 points out above, but is not commercial quality, as Ira Baxter points out, and often requires some modification to adapt to the sources in a particular project.

| |
1

Try TXL (see txl.ca). Also colm (complang.org)

| |
  • Parsing C++? I don't think so. Colm perhaps, maybe. – Ira Baxter Sep 8 '11 at 4:15
  • I parsed and transformed WebKit (~10 MLOC C++) library with TXL. Before doing my task i considered antlr, strategoXT, DMS, gccxml, and several other tools. I know that AST produced by txl is not perfect but for my practical task it was enough. – Andrey154 Sep 9 '11 at 17:05
  • OK, so one can get something out of TXL for this. Most interesting tasks require you resolve the ambiguities and get the meaning of names rights. What specifically did you transform? – Ira Baxter Sep 9 '11 at 17:42
  • I did code (functions) instrumentation for performance/memory consumption profiling. It is analog of -finstrument-functions gcc's flag. It significantly narrowed my bottlenecks search. – Andrey154 Sep 9 '11 at 18:41
  • So all you really needed was the ability to recognize the start of a method? – Ira Baxter Sep 9 '11 at 19:28
1

ROSE compiler infrastructure is also one option. It is an open source compiler infrastructure to build source-to-source program transformation and analysis tools for large-scale C(C89 and C98), C++(C++98 and C++11), UPC, Fortran (77/95/2003), OpenMP, Java, Python and PHP applications.

So it has the advantage of having OpenMP which clang lacks.

| |
0

EDIT: I leave the following for reference and maybe it will come in handy in the future (if just for ANTLR itself and not for the C++ grammar). As of now, please consider Ira Baxter's comment about the actual usefulness of it.

[There are some C++ grammars available for ANTLR. ANTLR itself can generate a so called "tree parser" which allows you to work with the AST. Having that said, I don't now how complete (or correct) the grammars are with respect to the C++ standard. As always, YMMV.]

| |
  • None of these have been in anger, that I am aware of. – Ira Baxter Sep 8 '11 at 4:14
  • I manage a team that builds C++ parsers. If they aren't complete and accurate, they simply aren't usable in practice. The guy behind the ANTLR C++ parser gave up working on it (read his release notes) and left it AFAIK in an incomplete state. I know of zero successful uses of that grammar. (I'd be pleased to hear to successful uses). I know of a number of successful uses of ours, and they were really hard to get right. For C++, if the parser doesn't work, it really doesn't work. It just got a lot worse: C++11 is out. (We do this. It was harder.) – Ira Baxter Sep 8 '11 at 6:24
  • ... continues to get harder. C++14 was out in 2014; C++17 is being threatened for release this year. – Ira Baxter Feb 12 '17 at 22:02
0

eclipse CDT's API is easy to use, you can checkout the codes, and get useful from it's unittests

| |
  • If it is still up to date, may you say a little more? Where do you access this tool in the IDE? What settings? – Sandburg Feb 4 '19 at 10:39
0

The example c_json.py from https://github.com/eliben/pycparser can do it.

main()
{
    printf("hello, world\n");
}

gives

{
    "_nodetype": "FileAST", 
    "coord": null, 
    "ext": [
        {
            "_nodetype": "FuncDef", 
            "body": {
                "_nodetype": "Compound", 
                "block_items": [
                    {
                        "_nodetype": "FuncCall", 
                        "args": {
                            "_nodetype": "ExprList", 
                            "coord": "hello.c:3", 
                            "exprs": [
                                {
                                    "_nodetype": "Constant", 
                                    "coord": "hello.c:3", 
                                    "type": "string", 
                                    "value": "\"hello, world\\n\""
                                }
                            ]
                        }, 
                        "coord": "hello.c:3", 
                        "name": {
                            "_nodetype": "ID", 
                            "coord": "hello.c:3", 
                            "name": "printf"
                        }
                    }
                ], 
                "coord": "hello.c:2"
            }, 
            "coord": "hello.c:1", 
            "decl": {
                "_nodetype": "Decl", 
                "bitsize": null, 
                "coord": "hello.c:1", 
                "funcspec": [], 
                "init": null, 
                "name": "main", 
                "quals": [], 
                "storage": [], 
                "type": {
                    "_nodetype": "FuncDecl", 
                    "args": null, 
                    "coord": "hello.c:1", 
                    "type": {
                        "_nodetype": "TypeDecl", 
                        "coord": "hello.c:1", 
                        "declname": "main", 
                        "quals": [], 
                        "type": {
                            "_nodetype": "IdentifierType", 
                            "coord": "hello.c:0", 
                            "names": [
                                "int"
                            ]
                        }
                    }
                }
            }, 
            "param_decls": null
        }
    ]
}

You may also be able to get the LLVM AST in parsable form, start at http://clang.llvm.org/docs/IntroductionToTheClangAST.html

| |
  • The first part of this answer is C only. – masterxilo Feb 12 '17 at 21:53

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.