9

I have a Byte array :

BYTE Buffer[20000]; this array contains the following data:

00FFFFFFFFFFFF0010AC4C4053433442341401030A2F1E78EEEE95A3544C99260F5054A54B00714F8180B3000101010101010101010121399030621A274068B03600DA281100001C000000FF003457314D44304353423443530A000000FC0044454C4C2050323231300A2020000000FD00384B1E5310000A20202020202000FA

My question is how can i search this array for a pattern like "000000FC"? I don't really think it is important, but i need the index where i can find my pattern too. Could someone provide an example for this, because i don't really understand this :(

  • It's exactly the same as searching for a substring in a larger string. Wikipedia has plenty of information. – Joey Sep 6 '11 at 11:50
  • 1
    Looks like strstr() (in C, don't know about C++) does what you want. – pmg Sep 6 '11 at 11:51
  • 5
    @pmg: strstr() works on zero-terminated arrays. It won't work on these, which contain zero-valued bytes. – Mike Seymour Sep 6 '11 at 13:11
  • 1
    +1 @Mike: I assumed the data exists as shown. If the "00" means "\x00" then strstr() is not right. – pmg Sep 6 '11 at 13:36
24

Since you're in C++, do it the C++ way:

char a[] = { 0, 0, 0, 0xFC };
char Buffer[20000] = ...

std::string needle(a, a + 4);
std::string haystack(Buffer, Buffer + 20000);  // or "+ sizeof Buffer"

std::size_t n = haystack.find(needle);

if (n == std::string::npos)
{
    // not found
}
else
{
    // position is n
}

You can also use an algorithm to search the array directly:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

auto it = std::search(
    std::begin(Buffer), std::end(Buffer),
    std::begin(a), std::end(a));

if (it == std::end(Buffer))
{
    // not found
}
else
{
    // subrange found at std::distance(std::begin(Buffer), it)
}

Or, in C++17, you can use a string view:

std::string_view sv(std::begin(Buffer), std::end(Buffer));

if (std::size_t n = sv.find(needle); n != sv.npos)
{
    // found at position n
}
else
{
    // not found
}
  • No problem. You can also create the needle in one line: std::string needle("\0x00\0x00\0x00\0xFC", 4);. Saves you a temporary :-) – Kerrek SB Sep 6 '11 at 12:44
  • assumes that the needle is word aligned. EDIT: just noticed it says a "BYTE" array and not a "BIT" array. – phoxis Sep 7 '11 at 5:20
  • came here hoping for an answer in c, was dissapoint. c++ implementation checks out though. thanks – sc2bigjoe Jun 11 '16 at 0:14
  • 1
    I was disappointed with the solution due to the copying involved, especially since the size in the demonstration is 20000 :( – Paul Sep 2 '16 at 20:05
  • 1
    @Paul: Great point, thanks. I didn't know C++ back then. I added a few other options. – Kerrek SB Sep 2 '16 at 20:11
7

You want something like memmem (that code is licensed with the GPL).

However, it should not be difficult to roll your own. Like in memmem's implementation, you need a loop that uses memchr to find the first character of your needle in the haystack, and memcmp to test each hit and see if all of your needle is there.

  • That's about the worst possible implementation of memmem... – R.. Sep 6 '11 at 12:37
  • @R..: Admittedly I did not look for others, and I only linked to it as an example. In the OP's shoes I 'd take my own advice and roll my own, as it's a simple matter really. – Jon Sep 6 '11 at 12:46
  • Rolling your own is not a bad idea, but O(N²) is pretty bad, especially when O(N) with best-case approaching N/M is possible... – R.. Sep 6 '11 at 12:52
  • @R..: Much easier to implement than a Boyer-Moore equivalent though. But anyway, what I 'd like to hear is how to amend the answer to make it useful (let's limit it to plain C since the accepted answer is a good C++ approach). – Jon Sep 6 '11 at 12:58
  • 3
    Everything you could ever want and more: igm.univ-mlv.fr/~lecroq/string – R.. Sep 6 '11 at 13:54
2

Try this, just needed it:

// Returns a pointer to the first byte of needle inside haystack, 
static uint8_t* bytes_find(uint8_t* haystack, size_t haystackLen, uint8_t* needle, size_t needleLen) {
    if (needleLen > haystackLen) {
        return false;
    }
    uint8_t* match = memchr(haystack, needle[0], haystackLen);
    if (match != NULL) {
        size_t remaining = haystackLen - ((uint8_t*)match - haystack);
        if (needleLen <= remaining) {
            if (memcmp(match, needle, needleLen) == 0) {
                return match;
            }
        }
    }
    return NULL;
}

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