0

SliderButton component

Here's a SliderButton component which combines a RadzenSlider and a button:

@code {
    private decimal _value;

    [Parameter]
    public EventCallback<decimal> ValChanged { get; set; }

    [Parameter]
    public decimal Val 
    {
        get => _value;

        set
        {
            if (_value == value) return;

            _value = value;

            ValChanged.InvokeAsync(value);
        }
    }

    [Parameter] public decimal Max { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public EventCallback<decimal> ChangeProc { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public EventCallback CommitProc { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public string Label { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public string ButtonStyle { get; set; } = "btn-primary";
}

<RadzenSlider Style="width: 50%; " @bind-Value="@Val" TValue="decimal" Min="0" Max="@(Math.Max(Max, 0.1m))" Change="ChangeProc" />

<button class="btn @ButtonStyle btn-sm" style="width: 150px;" @onclick="CommitProc">
    @Label @Val
</button>

Example usage

Here's an example usage of SliderButton in the app:

@code { private decimal deposit = 0; }

<SliderButton Label="Deposit" @bind-Val="@deposit" Max="economy_base.Cash" 
    ChangeProc="@(arg => { CopyEconomy(economy_base, economy); economy.Deposit(arg); })"
    CommitProc="@(() => { CopyEconomy(economy, economy_base); deposit = 0; })" />

Here's what that instance looks like (highlighted in red):

enter image description here

Parameter modification - _value = value; not recommended?

Another helpful user on here in another question said the following regarding this code:

Incidentally, you should not modify the values of parameter properties in your app. You should not do something like this:

   set
   {
      // ...
        _value = value;

      //... 
   }

parameter properties are the way Blazor passes values from one component to another, and you must not alter their values. If you need to manipulate thier values, you should create a local copy for them. Parameter properties should be treated as DTO. If you fail to adhere to this, you may incur very suble errors you'll never be able to discern.

Steve Sanderson's view

The user also pointed out the following issue from Steve Sanderson regarding parameter modification:

https://github.com/dotnet/aspnetcore/issues/26230

If a [Parameter] property has setter logic, the setter could be used to cause side effects that create problems, such as infinite rendering loops. There have been reports of side-effects causing unexpected extra rendering and overwriting parameter changes at #24599 (comment)

In general, a [Parameter] property is intended as a framework-managed communication channel between a parent and a child component. Developers shouldn't either (1) write to the parameter themselves, either from inside or outside the component, except when implementing their own SetParametersAsync logic, or (2) trigger any side-effects from the setter.

Additionally we should strengthen the documentation about parameters to advise developers that not only should they not overwrite the incoming data on a [Parameter] (because their changes can get lost next time the parent renders), but also they should not cause side-effects from the setter.

Why am I modifying the parameter?

When the user presses the button, the intention is for the slider to go to zero.

So looking at the code:

@code { private decimal deposit = 0; }

<SliderButton Label="Deposit" @bind-Val="@deposit" Max="economy_base.Cash" 
    ChangeProc="@(arg => { CopyEconomy(economy_base, economy); economy.Deposit(arg); })"
    CommitProc="@(() => { CopyEconomy(economy, economy_base); deposit = 0; })" />

you'll notice the following:

  • CommitProc sets deposit to zero. This runs when the user presses the button.
  • The RadzenSlider is bound to deposit. So when CommitProc sets deposit to zero, the slider is updated.

I setup the binding code based on this highly rated question:

How to make two-way binding on Blazor component

It explicitly recommends modifying the parameter in the setter.

Question

If modifying parameters is not recommended, what's the recommended approach to implementing something like SliderButton above?

Live app

There's a live instance of the app this is being used in here:

https://radzenslider20220725003447.azurewebsites.net/banking-system

Code

The app is a simple fractional reserve banking simulator.

The code is on github.

SliderButton:

https://github.com/dharmatech/FractionalReserveBankingTest/blob/slider-button-2022-08-01/BankCapitalWasm/Shared/SliderButton.razor

App:

https://github.com/dharmatech/FractionalReserveBankingTest/blob/slider-button-2022-08-01/BankCapitalWasm/Pages/BankingSystem.razor

Update

Some great answers have been posted below. I've implemented each of these in a test branch of the app to compare.

Mister Magoo:

https://github.com/dharmatech/FractionalReserveBankingTest/blob/569805a99cfd3bd3ea054cab2f8e6534411e6118/BankCapitalWasm/Shared/SliderButtonAlt3.razor

enet:

https://github.com/dharmatech/FractionalReserveBankingTest/blob/569805a99cfd3bd3ea054cab2f8e6534411e6118/BankCapitalWasm/Shared/SliderButtonAlt4.razor

Shaun Curtis:

https://github.com/dharmatech/FractionalReserveBankingTest/blob/569805a99cfd3bd3ea054cab2f8e6534411e6118/BankCapitalWasm/Shared/SliderButtonAlt5.razor

3
  • 2
    If you want an ACTIVE control (one that causes stuff to happen), then generally it's better to avoid 2-way binding and handle the change in an event handler instead. The purpose of the ValChanged event is to allow the parent to do 2-way binding using @bind-Val. The event callback is what lets the parent know the new value, not changes you make to Val. Invoke ValChanged from an async event handler for whatever of the Radzen control's events that expose the changed value. (It looks like ChangeProc). You don't need to @bind-value in the Radzen component, either. Aug 2 at 3:01
  • @Bennyboy1973 Thanks for taking a look. According to the Radzen documentation, the way to change the value of a RadzenSlider is to use @bind-Value.
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 5:56
  • @Bennyboy1973 Link to the documentation: blazor.radzen.com/docs/guides/components/…
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 6:41

4 Answers 4

2

The first thing to say is you are not modifying a Parameter with this code:

CommitProc="@(() => { CopyEconomy(economy, economy_base); deposit = 0; })"

  • you are modifying a local variable deposit in the parent - as per your example
@code { private decimal deposit = 0; }

<SliderButton Label="Deposit" @bind-Val="@deposit" Max="economy_base.Cash" 
    ChangeProc="@(arg => { CopyEconomy(economy_base, economy); economy.Deposit(arg); })"
    CommitProc="@(() => { CopyEconomy(economy, economy_base); deposit = 0; })" />

deposit is a local variable to the consumer of the SliderButton.

What will happen here is

  1. User clicks the button, which Invokes your CommitProc
  2. CommitProc sets deposit to zero
  3. Blazor calls StateHasChanged on the parent/consumer of SliderButton because CommitProc is an EventCallback
  4. The internal renderer detects a change in deposit and calls for a re-render of SliderButton with the new deposit value = 0.

This is all perfectly acceptable and in no way related to the linked discussions about momdifying Parameters inside a component.

Edit: Additional clarification.

Yes, setting _value - which is the backing field for Parameter Val is a bad idea as described in the linked notes.

I would do this instead - using a private field for the Radzen binding.

@code {

    [Parameter]
    public EventCallback<decimal> ValChanged { get; set; }

    [Parameter]
    public decimal Val { get; set; }

    private decimal _value
    {
        get => Val;

        set
        {
            if (_value == value) return;

            ValChanged.InvokeAsync(value);
        }
    }

    [Parameter] public decimal Max { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public EventCallback<decimal> ChangeProc { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public EventCallback CommitProc { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public string Label { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public string ButtonStyle { get; set; } = "btn-primary";
}

<RadzenSlider Style="width: 50%; " @bind-Value="@_value" TValue="decimal" Min="0" Max="@(Math.Max(Max, 0.1m))" Change="ChangeProc" />

<button class="btn @ButtonStyle btn-sm" style="width: 150px;" @onclick="CommitProc">
    @Label @Val
</button>
4
  • Thanks for taking a look. 🙂 Yup, I understand what you're saying there. The person with the critique said that the line _value = value; in the implementation of SliderButton meant that that parameter was modifying itself. He's saying that that's not recommended.
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 10:13
  • 1
    Ok, understood - answer updated Aug 2 at 10:46
  • Yup, I tested your code just now and it worked. Thank Mister Magoo! Good suggestion.
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 10:51
  • Before you made your update, I also posted another approach: stackoverflow.com/a/73206088/268581
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 10:52
2

As everyone else has written an answer to this, I didn't want to miss out!

I don't think there's a need for a setter at all. It's purpose is to catch a change in the value which you can do by wiring in the "Bind" stuff manually (in a similar way to the InputBase controls). Any slider changes are now captured by SliderChanged and passed to the parent by calling ValueChanged. In the parent this is bound through @bind-value to update deposit.


<RadzenSlider Style="width: 50%;" Value=@Value TValue=decimal Min=0 Max=@(Math.Max(Max, 0.1m)) ValueChanged=SliderChanged />
<button class="btn @ButtonStyle btn-sm ms-2" style="width: 150px;" @onclick=CommitProc>
    @this.Label @this.Value
</button>

@code {
    [Parameter] public decimal Value { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public EventCallback<decimal> ValueChanged { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public decimal Max { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public EventCallback CommitProc { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public EventCallback<decimal> ChangeProc { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public string Label { get; set; } = string.Empty;
    [Parameter] public string ButtonStyle { get; set; } = "btn-primary";

    void SliderChanged(decimal value)
    {
        ValueChanged.InvokeAsync(value);
        if (ChangeProc.HasDelegate)
            ChangeProc.InvokeAsync(value);
    }
}

Here's my test page:

@page "/"

<PageTitle>Index</PageTitle>

<h1>Hello, world!</h1>

<SliderButton Label="Deposit" @bind-Value=deposit Max="100" ChangeProc=this.Change CommitProc=this.Commit />

<div class=" m-3 p-2 bg-dark text-white">
    @deposit
</div>
@code {
    private decimal deposit = 0;

    private async Task Change(decimal value)
    {
        //emulate your CopyEconomy stuff
        await Task.Delay(100);
    }

    private async Task Commit()
    {
        //emulate your CopyEconomy stuff
        await Task.Delay(100);
        deposit = 0;
    }
}
6
  • [Polite] The way you do that is more or less similar to how Mister Magoo does it. This is valid and it should work. It is less confusing than Mister Magoo's approach, and I'm of the opinion that it's a better solution as it allows you to perform various manipulations, validations, calling a database, etc. in the SliderChanged method before passing it back to the parent component. Not that it is expected here, but I speak in general. Yes, it's much clearer, and valid. But alas, to do that that way requires some knowledge, which I believe @dharmatech does not have.
    – enet
    Aug 2 at 17:42
  • After all, I think, the question is about a structured way not to overrides parameter properties. What is more natural than using a simple and clear way to do that. Incidentally, does your code work without providing ValueExpression?
    – enet
    Aug 2 at 17:42
  • Thanks! Interesting approach. Nice and concise.
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 17:58
  • 1
    @enet . Yes you only need the two. There's no indication of validation here, and without the full context, I intentionally missed it out. Thx. Aug 2 at 20:05
  • Just got a chance to test it in the app and yup, works as expected. Link to the file. I also have the other answers as variations in that branch to explore.
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 21:07
0

Here's SliderButton based on the approach described in enet's answer. I've tested it and it works.

@code {

    [Parameter]
    public EventCallback<decimal> ValChanged { get; set; }

    [Parameter]
    public decimal Val { get; set; }

    private decimal _value;
    private decimal LocalVal
    {
        get => _value;

        set
        {
            if (_value == value) return;

            _value = value;

            ValChanged.InvokeAsync(_value);
        }
    }

    protected override void OnParametersSet()
    {
        if (LocalVal != Val)
        {
            LocalVal = Val;
        }
    }

    [Parameter] public decimal Max { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public EventCallback<decimal> ChangeProc { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public EventCallback CommitProc { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public string Label { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public string ButtonStyle { get; set; } = "btn-primary";
}

<RadzenSlider Style="width: 50%; " @bind-Value="@LocalVal" TValue="decimal" Min="0" Max="@(Math.Max(Max, 0.1m))" Change="ChangeProc" />

<button class="btn @ButtonStyle btn-sm" style="width: 150px;" @onclick="CommitProc">
    @Label @Val
</button>
-2

Here's another implementation of SliderButton which doesn't change Val from within the setter, which seems to be the main criqitue.

@code {
    [Parameter]
    public EventCallback<decimal> ValChanged { get; set; }

    [Parameter]
    public decimal Val { get; set; }   

    async Task UpdateVal(decimal arg)
    {
        Val = arg;

        await ValChanged.InvokeAsync(Val);
    }

    [Parameter] public decimal Max { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public EventCallback<decimal> ChangeProc { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public EventCallback CommitProc { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public string Label { get; set; }

    [Parameter] public string ButtonStyle { get; set; } = "btn-primary";
}

<RadzenSlider Style="width: 50%;" Value=@Val TValue="decimal" Min="0" Max="@(Math.Max(Max, 0.1m))" 
    Change=@(async val => 
    { 
        await UpdateVal(val);  
        await ChangeProc.InvokeAsync(val); 
    }) />

<button class="btn @ButtonStyle btn-sm" style="width: 150px;" @onclick="CommitProc">
    @Label @Val
</button>

Component file on github:

https://github.com/dharmatech/FractionalReserveBankingTest/blob/68d9beee2b24ca1c72cbeb52cdd3b0ef3b4d394d/BankCapitalWasm/Shared/SliderButtonAlt2.razor

The approach here is based on what's described at this page on Blazor University:

https://blazor-university.com/components/two-way-binding/

Update

Here's a new version based on the comments below. What changed?

  • Remove Val = arg
  • Change await ValChanged.InvokeAsync(Val); to await ValChanged.InvokeAsync(val);
  • Move await ValChanged.InvokeAsync(val); to lambda
  • Remove UpdateVal
@code {

    // two-way binding
    [Parameter] public decimal Val { get; set; }   
    [Parameter] public EventCallback<decimal> ValChanged { get; set; }
        
    // one-way binding
    [Parameter] public decimal Max { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public EventCallback<decimal> ChangeProc { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public EventCallback CommitProc { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public string Label { get; set; }
    [Parameter] public string ButtonStyle { get; set; } = "btn-primary";
}

<RadzenSlider Style="width: 50%;" Value=@Val TValue=decimal Min=0 Max=@(Math.Max(Max, 0.1m))
    Change=@(async val => 
    { 
        await ValChanged.InvokeAsync(val);
        await ChangeProc.InvokeAsync(val); 
    }) />

<button class="btn @ButtonStyle btn-sm" style="width: 150px;" @onclick=CommitProc>
    @Label @Val
</button>
5
  • 3
    you are modifying the Val parameter ! The point is not to modify it, not the location (set accessor) where it it modified.
    – enet
    Aug 2 at 10:52
  • OK, thanks for the clarification. I'm reviewing the answers from you and Mister Magoo above.
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 11:01
  • 1
    I agree with @enet on this. I don't care what other sources do. There are very valid reasons to never set Parameters outside the SetParametersAsync context. For reference, here's about the only case I know where it's valid to do so - docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/blazor/…. Aug 2 at 16:21
  • @MrCakaShaunCurtis I've added the new version to this answer. It does indeed seem very similar to yours. Note that I left in the awaits. Not sure if I should remove them or leave them in. It works with them in.
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 22:28
  • @enet I've updated this answer to add a modified version. I list the changes I made there. After the changes, it seems nearly identical to Shaun 's version.
    – dharmatech
    Aug 2 at 22:29

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