33

Is there a way to define a XPath type query for nested python dictionaries.

Something like this:

foo = {
  'spam':'eggs',
  'morefoo': {
               'bar':'soap',
               'morebar': {'bacon' : 'foobar'}
              }
   }

print( foo.select("/morefoo/morebar") )

>> {'bacon' : 'foobar'}

I also needed to select nested lists ;)

This can be done easily with @jellybean's solution:

def xpath_get(mydict, path):
    elem = mydict
    try:
        for x in path.strip("/").split("/"):
            try:
                x = int(x)
                elem = elem[x]
            except ValueError:
                elem = elem.get(x)
    except:
        pass

    return elem

foo = {
  'spam':'eggs',
  'morefoo': [{
               'bar':'soap',
               'morebar': {
                           'bacon' : {
                                       'bla':'balbla'
                                     }
                           }
              },
              'bla'
              ]
   }

print xpath_get(foo, "/morefoo/0/morebar/bacon")

[EDIT 2016] This question and the accepted answer are ancient. The newer answers may do the job better than the original answer. However I did not test them so I won't change the accepted answer.

  • Why not using foo['morefoo']['morebar'] ? – MarcoS Sep 6 '11 at 13:07
  • 5
    because I want to do: def bla(query): data.select(query) – RickyA Sep 6 '11 at 13:12
  • @MarcoS It would be more interesting with lists where the path microlanguage would return multiple items. – Pavel Šimerda Oct 14 '17 at 9:44
  • @PavelŠimerda Yes, way more interesting, especially with wildcard queries (find all values under a specific key), and then - also recurse down lists or [named]tuples... – Tomasz Gandor Apr 25 '18 at 21:36

10 Answers 10

10

Not exactly beautiful, but you might use sth like

def xpath_get(mydict, path):
    elem = mydict
    try:
        for x in path.strip("/").split("/"):
            elem = elem.get(x)
    except:
        pass

    return elem

This doesn't support xpath stuff like indices, of course ... not to mention the / key trap unutbu indicated.

  • In 2011 maybe there weren't as many options as there are today, but in 2014, I think, solving the problem this way is not elegant and should be avoided. – nikolay Sep 26 '14 at 1:37
  • 9
    @nikolay is this just a guess or are there solutions that solve this more nicely? – Nils Werner Dec 16 '15 at 12:23
19

One of the best libraries I've been able to identify, which, in addition, is very actively developed, is an extracted project from boto: JMESPath. It has a very powerful syntax of doing things that would normally take pages of code to express.

Here are some examples:

search('foo | bar', {"foo": {"bar": "baz"}}) -> "baz"
search('foo[*].bar | [0]', {
    "foo": [{"bar": ["first1", "second1"]},
            {"bar": ["first2", "second2"]}]}) -> ["first1", "second1"]
search('foo | [0]', {"foo": [0, 1, 2]}) -> [0]
  • but this does not allow to modify the dict :( – Gaetan Nov 22 '18 at 13:55
12

There is an easier way to do this now.

http://github.com/akesterson/dpath-python

$ easy_install dpath
>>> dpath.util.search(YOUR_DICTIONARY, "morefoo/morebar")

... done. Or if you don't like getting your results back in a view (merged dictionary that retains the paths), yield them instead:

$ easy_install dpath
>>> for (path, value) in dpath.util.search(YOUR_DICTIONARY, "morefoo/morebar", yielded=True)

... and done. 'value' will hold {'bacon': 'foobar'} in that case.

  • The iterated statement doesn't run---there's no body to the for statement. – Mittenchops Jul 2 '13 at 15:04
12

There is the newer jsonpath-rw library supporting a JSONPATH syntax but for python dictionaries and arrays, as you wished.

So your 1st example becomes:

from jsonpath_rw import parse

print( parse('$.morefoo.morebar').find(foo) )

And the 2nd:

print( parse("$.morefoo[0].morebar.bacon").find(foo) )

PS: An alternative simpler library also supporting dictionaries is python-json-pointer with a more XPath-like syntax.

  • Note that jsonpath uses eval and jsonpath-rw looks unmaintained (it also says some features are missing, but I haven't tried it). – Sam Brightman Aug 19 '17 at 10:53
3

If terseness is your fancy:

def xpath(root, path, sch='/'):
    return reduce(lambda acc, nxt: acc[nxt],
                  [int(x) if x.isdigit() else x for x in path.split(sch)],
                  root)

Of course, if you only have dicts, then it's simpler:

def xpath(root, path, sch='/'):
    return reduce(lambda acc, nxt: acc[nxt],
                  path.split(sch),
                  root)

Good luck finding any errors in your path spec tho ;-)

  • This will avoid converting things to ints if a node is a dict: def xpath(root, path, sep='/'): return reduce(lambda node, key: node[key if hasattr(node, 'keys') else int(key)], path.split(sep), root) – samwyse Mar 28 '18 at 17:18
  • Cool solution. For Python 3, need from functools import reduce though. – Adrian W Jul 11 '18 at 15:25
  • I like this terseness - the parser should give a key not found error when the path spec is wrong, so that should not be very painful to debug. – michaPau Apr 20 at 18:28
1

More work would have to be put into how the XPath-like selector would work. '/' is a valid dictionary key, so how would

foo={'/':{'/':'eggs'},'//':'ham'}

be handled?

foo.select("///")

would be ambiguous.

  • Yes, you would need a parser for that. But what I am asking is for a xpath like method. "morefoo.morebar" is fine by me. – RickyA Sep 6 '11 at 13:24
  • 2
    @RickyA: '.' is also a value dictionary key. The same problem would exist. foo.select('...') would be ambiguous. – unutbu Sep 6 '11 at 13:44
1

Another alternative (besides that suggested by jellybean) is this:

def querydict(d, q):
  keys = q.split('/')
  nd = d
  for k in keys:
    if k == '':
      continue
    if k in nd:
      nd = nd[k]
    else:
      return None
  return nd

foo = {
  'spam':'eggs',
  'morefoo': {
               'bar':'soap',
               'morebar': {'bacon' : 'foobar'}
              }
   }
print querydict(foo, "/morefoo/morebar")
1

Is there any reason for you to the query it the way like the XPath pattern? As the commenter to your question suggested, it just a dictionary, so you can access the elements in a nest manner. Also, considering that data is in the form of JSON, you can use simplejson module to load it and access the elements too.

There is this project JSONPATH, which is trying to help people do opposite of what you intend to do (given an XPATH, how to make it easily accessible via python objects), which seems more useful.

  • The reason is that I want to split the data and the query. I want to be flexible in the query part. If I access it the nested way the query is hardcoded in the program. – RickyA Sep 6 '11 at 13:28
  • @RickyA, in the other comment you say morefoo.morebar is fine. Did you check the JSONPATH project (Download and look at the source and tests). – Senthil Kumaran Sep 6 '11 at 13:30
  • I did take a look at JSONPATH, but my input is not text/json. It's nested dictionaries. – RickyA Sep 6 '11 at 13:44
  • @RickyA's question is super valuable when using mongodb, for example. If you want to iterate over nested keys in a BSON document, this is necessary. – Mittenchops Jul 2 '13 at 14:47
0

dict > json > jmespath

You can use JMESPath which is a query language for JSON, and which has a python implementation.

import jmespath # pip install jmespath

data = {'root': {'section': {'item1': 'value1', 'item2': 'value2'}}}

jmespath.search('root.section.item2', data)
Out[42]: 'value2'

The jmespath query syntax and live examples: http://jmespath.org/tutorial.html

dict > xml > xpath

Another option would be converting your dictionaries to XML using something like dicttoxml and then use regular XPath expressions e.g. via lxml or whatever other library you prefer.

from dicttoxml import dicttoxml  # pip install dicttoxml
from lxml import etree  # pip install lxml

data = {'root': {'section': {'item1': 'value1', 'item2': 'value2'}}}
xml_data = dicttoxml(data, attr_type=False)
Out[43]: b'<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?><root><root><section><item1>value1</item1><item2>value2</item2></section></root></root>'

tree = etree.fromstring(xml_data)
tree.xpath('//item2/text()')
Out[44]: ['value2']
0
def Dict(var, *arg, **kwarg):
  """ Return the value of an (imbricated) dictionnary, if all fields exist else return "" unless "default=new_value" specified as end argument
      Avoid TypeError: argument of type 'NoneType' is not iterable
      Ex: Dict(variable_dict, 'field1', 'field2', default = 0)
  """
  for key in arg:
    if isinstance(var, dict) and key and key in var:  var = var[key]
    else:  return kwarg['default'] if kwarg and 'default' in kwarg else ""   # Allow Dict(var, tvdbid).isdigit() for example
  return kwarg['default'] if var in (None, '', 'N/A', 'null') and kwarg and 'default' in kwarg else "" if var in (None, '', 'N/A', 'null') else var

foo = {
  'spam':'eggs',
  'morefoo': {
               'bar':'soap',
               'morebar': {'bacon' : 'foobar'}
              }
   }
print Dict(foo, 'morefoo', 'morebar')
print Dict(foo, 'morefoo', 'morebar', default=None)

Have a SaveDict(value, var, *arg) function that can even append to lists in dict...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.