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In this MSDN article (Chapter 6 — Improving ASP.NET Performance), it says the following:

"Avoid Asynchronous Calls Unless You Have Additional Parallel Work

Make asynchronous calls from your Web application only when your application has additional parallel work to perform while it waits for the completion of the asynchronous calls, and the work performed by the asynchronous call is not CPU bound. Internally, the asynchronous calls use a worker thread from the thread pool; in effect, you are using additional threads.

At the same time that you make asynchronous I/O calls, such as calling a Web method or performing file operations, the thread that makes the call is released so that it can perform additional work, such as making other asynchronous calls or performing other parallel tasks. You can then wait for completion of all of those tasks. Making several asynchronous calls that are not CPU bound and then letting them run simultaneously can improve throughput.

This is confusing to me. My understanding was that when you make an asynchronous I/O call that no thread is used while waiting, but that an IOCP is set with a reference to your callback method. Is it true that you should only use async calls when you have parallel work? My understanding was that for an ASP.NET Web Service, it is often a good idea to change a WebMethod Foo to BeginFoo/EndFoo when you will be calling an I/O bound operation and implement the whole thing asynchronously.

Can someone help me understand what is meant by “asynchronous calls use a worker thread from the thread pool; in effect, you are using additional threads”, and the difference between WorkerThreads and IO-threads?

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It's important to make a clear distinction process intensive operations (like calculating the one billionth prime number) and IO bound operations (like making a web service request).

A process intensive operation does require a thread to run on, so you are correct, using the ASP.NET asynchronous implementation has no benefit since you are still taking up an IIS thread.

IO bound operations are different, they use operating system IO completion ports and do not require a thread. In this case it can really help to use the ASP.NET asynchronous model because the request processing will only require a thread for a short time to execute the IO request, and then another thread for a short time to process the IO callback and return the response. This can really help scalability.

Jeff Prosise has a good post on the subject here: http://www.wintellect.com/CS/blogs/jprosise/archive/2010/03/29/asynchronous-controllers-in-asp-net-mvc-2.aspx

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Each request to an ASP.NET application is run in its own thread from a pool of threads available to the w3wp worker process. When you run an asynchronous call you are, in effect, making a separate request to the ASP.NET application and using another of the threads available in the pool. The pool is a fixed size depending upon your server configuration and hardware limitations, it represents the maximum number of request your server can fulfill at any one time.

Asynchronous calls are used primarily when multiple "heavy" operations are necessary in order to decrease the time it takes to return a page to the client and in some cases to increase overall thread availability.

Think of it this way, you request a webpage that has four stock graphs (1 thread in use). The page makes a request to the first stock service (1 new thread + 1 old thread = 2 threads in use.) The page receives the results (1 thread closed, 1 thread in use). The page makes a request to the second stock service (1 new thread + 1 old thread = 2 threads in use.) And so on. Assuming each stock service takes four seconds to respond, you are tying up 2 threads at 16 seconds each for a total processing time of 32 seconds (not to mention the fact that it takes 16 seconds for the clients page to load.) These numbers are all fake of course but are intended to illustrate the point.

Now, in an asynchronous implementation you request a webpage that has four stock graphs (1 thread in use.) The page makes four requests to stock services (1 old thread + 4 new threads = 5 threads in use) Assuming each stock service takes four seconds to respond, you are tying up 5 threads at 4 seconds each for a total processing time of 20 seconds AND the client received the page in 4 seconds. You reduced the overall cost of the operations because your primary thread, which cannot be released until the client page is served, was in use for a shorter period of time.

Finally, none of this has much to do with I/O threads. Calling an asynchrounous web method because it contains I/O operations will not necessarily provide you with any benefit unless you have significant processing to complete while you wait for the results. Or, in the words of the article, "Avoid Asynchronous Calls Unless You Have Additional Parallel Work."

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have a look at this one http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms979194.aspx as it should show you how to monitor thread pool. Hope this helps... Regards, Andy

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