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Sometimes when I'm proving something, I have a hypothesis P x y, and I know that I have a definition like R x := exists y, P x y. I would like to add the hypothesis R x, but I don't know how to do it. I tried to use pose proof (R x), but I got something of type Prop. Is there a way to do it?

2 Answers 2

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If you have a hypothesis Hxy: P x y, you can write assert (Rx: R x) by (exists y; assumption).

On the other direction, if you have a hypothesis Hx: R x, the tactic destruct Hx as [y Pxy] adds the witness yand the corresponding hypothesis to your context.

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You can add a new argument to your lemma, and inside the proof, you can then extract a witness y' for your y. In ssreflect, you could write:

From mathcomp Require Import all_ssreflect.

Set Implicit Arguments.
Unset Strict Implicit.
Unset Printing Implicit Defensive.

Variable T : Type.

Variable P : T -> T -> Prop.

Definition R x := exists y, P x y.

Lemma foo x y (p : P x y) (r : R x) : false.
Proof.
move: r => [y' pxy'].

EDIT: You can also derive a proof of R x directly in the proof of foo, as follows:

Lemma foo x y (p : P x y) : false.
Proof.
have r : R x by exists y.
move: r => [y' pxy'].

or, more succinctly:

Lemma foo x y (p : P x y) : false.
Proof.
have [y' pxy'] : R x by exists y.
``
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  • I don't see how this answers the question asked by the OP.
    – eponier
    Aug 8 at 11:24
  • This is to address the sentence "I would like to add the hypothesis R x, but I don't know how to do it." This is done here by adding one additional parameter, r, to the whole lemma. Note that R is only a definition, not a Prop. Aug 8 at 14:03
  • 1
    Oh, sorry: I see the point of your question. One can indeed also add explicitly the R x property without having to add an additional parameter via have r : R x by exists y. in the proof of foo. I got sidetracked by the use of the word "hypothesis" in the original question. Aug 8 at 18:18

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