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I'm building a Python script to do a network inventory on our internal system. Each system has up to five clusters and I am looking for a way to adjust the list to put them all into one line per cluster. Here's the way they are stored on the system:

Cluster One
Primary System
Node One
x.x.x.x (Node IP)
Node two
x.x.x.x (Node IP)
Cluster Two
Primary System
Node One
x.x.x.x (Node IP)
Node two
x.x.x.x (Node IP)

I need to have them adjusted to look like this:

Cluster One,Primary System,Node One,x.x.x.x (Node IP),Node Two,x.x.x.x (Node IP)
Cluster Two,Primary System,Node One,x.x.x.x (Node IP),Node Two,x.x.x.x (Node IP)

Here is some REALLY sloppy code I'm using right now, but I was wondering if there is a more efficient way to do it:

NetworkTableCount = len(NetworkTable) / 6 + 1
    count = 1
    while count < NetworkTableCount:
            if count == 1:
                    Temp = (NetworkTable[0]+","+NetworkTable[1]+","+NetworkTable[2]+","+NetworkTable[3]+","+NetworkTable[4]+","+NetworkTable[5]+"\n")
            elif count == 2:
                    Temp = (NetworkTable[6]+","+NetworkTable[7]+","+NetworkTable[8]+","+NetworkTable[9]+","+NetworkTable[10]+","+NetworkTable[11]+"\n")
            elif count == 3:
                    Temp = (NetworkTable[12]+","+NetworkTable[13]+","+NetworkTable[14]+","+NetworkTable[15]+","+NetworkTable[16]+","+NetworkTable[17]+"\n")
            elif count == 4:
                    Temp = (NetworkTable[18]+","+NetworkTable[19]+","+NetworkTable[20]+","+NetworkTable[21]+","+NetworkTable[22]+","+NetworkTable[23]+"\n")
            elif count == 5:
                    Temp = (NetworkTable[24]+","+NetworkTable[25]+","+NetworkTable[26]+","+NetworkTable[27]+","+NetworkTable[28]+","+NetworkTable[29]+"\n")
            NetworkTopology.write(Temp)
            count = count + 1

I'm self taught in Python so it may just be a simple adjustment. Thanks in advance.

  • 1
    You should first refactor your code to simplificate the computation of Temp. There is enough ressemblance in these lines to generalise them into one easier to read line. Consider using something like this: index = (count - 1) * 6; ",".join(NetworkTable[index:index+6]) – Lynch Sep 6 '11 at 18:43
2

First look: How do you split a list into evenly sized chunks?

Using one of the answers:

>>> import itertools
>>> NetworkTable
['Cluster One', 'Primary System', 'Node One', 'x.x.x.x (Node IP)', 'Node two', 'x.x.x.x (Node IP)', 'Cluster Two', 'Primary System', 'Node One', 'x.x.x.x (Node IP)', 'Node two', 'x.x.x.x (Node IP)']
>>> l = [NetworkTable[i:i+6] for i in range(0, len(NetworkTable), 6)]
>>> l
[['Cluster One', 'Primary System', 'Node One', 'x.x.x.x (Node IP)', 'Node two', 'x.x.x.x (Node IP)'], ['Cluster Two', 'Primary System', 'Node One', 'x.x.x.x (Node IP)', 'Node two', 'x.x.x.x (Node IP)']]
>>> #Now it's easy. Do what you want with l.
>>> [", ".join(i) + "\n" for i in l]
['Cluster One, Primary System, Node One, x.x.x.x (Node IP), Node two, x.x.x.x (Node IP)\n', 'Cluster Two, Primary System, Node One, x.x.x.x (Node IP), Node two, x.x.x.x (Node IP)\n']
1

I would proces the lines based on the name they begin with, as it seems a 'Cluster' specifies a new set of data:

file = open('my_file')
clusters=[]
line = file.readline()
while line.strip().startswith("Cluster"):
        cluster = []
        cluster.append(line.strip())
        line = file.readline()
        cluster.append(line.strip())
        line = file.readline()
        while line.strip().startswith("Node"):
                node = []
                node.append(line.strip())
                line = file.readline()
                node.append(line.strip())
                cluster.append(node)
                line = file.readline()
        clusters.append(cluster)
# now you have a list of clusters, where nodes are in a list too
print(clusters[0])
print(clusters[1])
  • Thank you for the answer. Unfortunately it's not ALWAYS called "Cluster". It's based on how the system is configured, but about 80% DO start with "Cluster". No matter what though, it'll always be in sets of six. – Taylor Sep 9 '11 at 13:02

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