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How can I concatenate matrices of same columns but different number of rows? For example, I want to concatenate a (dim(a) = 15 7000) and b (dim(b) = 16 7000) and I want the result to be a matrix of 31 rows by 7000 columns.

Can I also do this for matrices with a different number of rows and columns? Say I want to combine a matrix of 15 rows and 7000 columns with another of 16 rows and 7500 columns. Can I create one dataset with that?

4 Answers 4

64

Sounds like you're looking for rbind:

> a<-matrix(nrow=10,ncol=5)
> b<-matrix(nrow=20,ncol=5)
> dim(rbind(a,b))
[1] 30  5

Similarly, cbind stacks the matrices horizontally.

I am not entirely sure what you mean by the last question ("Can I do this for matrices of different rows and columns.?")

3
  • Say I want to combine a matrix of 15 rows and 7000 columns and another of 16 rwos and 7500 columns. The goal is to loop through each row and find the max value. Commented Sep 6, 2011 at 19:22
  • 4
    @GTyler Your question for combining 15x7000 and 16x7500 is not well defined. You'll need to edit your question (not leave a comment) to specify things like: what dimension is the result? what happens to all the excess rows/column? how is each element of the resulting matrix uniquely determined?
    – joran
    Commented Sep 6, 2011 at 20:48
  • @joran I disagree and I also think that rbind or cbind are the wrong functions for this problem! Being able to combine data frames or matrices of differing row and/or column numbers is more suited to cbindX, as I mention below!
    – gawbul
    Commented Jun 9, 2013 at 13:54
7

cbindX from the package gdata combines multiple columns of differing column and row lengths. Check out the page here:

http://hosho.ees.hokudai.ac.jp/~kubo/Rdoc/library/gdata/html/cbindX.html

It takes multiple comma separated matrices and data.frames as input :) You just need to

install.packages("gdata", dependencies=TRUE)

and then

library(gdata)
concat_data <- cbindX(df1, df2, df3) # or cbindX(matrix1, matrix2, matrix3, matrix4)
3
  • 1
    cbindX is a great function, but the OP clearly only is asking about binding matrices by row (note the dimensions of the result they specify), not by column, and gdata does not contain an analogous rbind function. There is an rbind.fill function in plyr however.
    – joran
    Commented Jun 9, 2013 at 14:58
  • Additionally, my comment that their question was not well defined was correct. You seem to be ignoring this part: "The goal is to loop through each row and find the max value." It is entirely unclear what the OP meant by that. If they were only going to fill missing cells with NA, then I would have simply recommended rbind.fill.
    – joran
    Commented Jun 9, 2013 at 15:05
  • I still disagree. cbindX does what they want, i.e. "combine a matrix of 15 rows and 7000 columns and another of 16 rwos and 7500 columns". rbind.fill seems to work with differing column numbers too though? That being said, dplyr now uses the rbind_list or rbind_all. They can then use something like apply(concat_data, 1, max) to get the max values per row?
    – gawbul
    Commented Jan 5, 2015 at 14:58
0

Others have addressed the matter of concatenating two matrices:

  • horizontally with cbind (the "c" stands for "column", so you are binding the columns of the two matrices); or
  • vertically with rbind (the "r" stands for "row", so you are binding the rows of the two matrices).

What others haven't pointed out explicitly is that:

  • because cbind binds columns, the two matrices have to have the same number of rows: cbind builds a matrix that is wider, but it needs the "height" (# of rows) of the two matrices to match; and
  • because rbind binds rows, the two matrices have to have the same number of columns: rbind builds a matrix that is taller, but it needs the "width" (# of columns) of the two matrices to match.

Take a look at this:

> A <- matrix(nrow = 3, ncol = 4)
> B <- matrix(nrow = 3, ncol = 5)
> C <- matrix(nrow = 4, ncol = 5)
> D <- cbind(A, B)  # Works because A and B have same # of rows
> cbind(A, C)       # Fails
Error in cbind(A, C) : number of rows of matrices must match (see arg 2)
> E <- rbind(B, C)  # Works because B and C have same # of columns
> rbind(A, C)       # Fails
Error in rbind(A, C) : 
  number of columns of matrices must match (see arg 2)

So, no, you cannot put together two matrices if they have a different number of rows and a different number of columns. You would need to do something to either one of the matrices first, to make sure that their shapes become compatible for concatenation.

0

From the dplyr documentation we have bind_cols and bind_rows:

bind_cols   Efficiently bind multiple data frames 
 by row and column
bind_rows   Efficiently bind multiple data frames 
 by row and column

So using dplyr:

A = matrix(1:9, ncol = 3)
B = matrix(1:9, ncol = 3)

A %>% as_tibble(A,B) %>% bind_rows(as_tibble(B))
     V1    V2    V3
  <int> <int> <int>
1     1     4     7
2     2     5     8
3     3     6     9
4     1     4     7
5     2     5     8
6     3     6     9

A %>% as_tibble() %>% bind_cols(as_tibble(B))
  V1...1 V2...2 V3...3 V1...4 V2...5 V3...6
   <int>  <int>  <int>  <int>  <int>  <int>
1      1      4      7      1      4      7
2      2      5      8      2      5      8
3      3      6      9      3      6      9

If you want return as a matrix just %>% as.matrix()

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