1001

Let's suppose if we have a class like

class Person { 
    internal int PersonID; 
    internal string car  ; 
}

Now I have a list of this class: List<Person> persons;

Now this list can have multiple instances with same PersonIDs, for example:

persons[0] = new Person { PersonID = 1, car = "Ferrari" }; 
persons[1] = new Person { PersonID = 1, car = "BMW"     }; 
persons[2] = new Person { PersonID = 2, car = "Audi"    }; 

Is there a way I can group by personID and get the list of all the cars he has?

For example, expected result would be

class Result { 
   int PersonID;
   List<string> cars; 
}

So after grouping, I would get:

results[0].PersonID = 1; 
List<string> cars = results[0].cars; 

result[1].PersonID = 2; 
List<string> cars = result[1].cars;

From what I have done so far:

var results = from p in persons
              group p by p.PersonID into g
              select new { PersonID = g.Key, // this is where I am not sure what to do

Could someone please point me in the right direction?

  • There is another example including Count and Sum here stackoverflow.com/questions/3414080/… – Developer Aug 5 '16 at 14:22
  • @Martin Källman: I agree with Chris Walsh. Most likely an app that has the O.P.'s "Person(s)" Class (Table) would already have a "'normal'" "Person(s)" Class (Table) that has the usu. Properties / Columns (i.e. name, gender, DOB). The O.P.'s "Person(s)" Class (Table) would prolly be a Child Class (Table) of the "'normal'" "Person(s)" Class ( Table) (i.e. an "OrderItem(s)" Class (Table) vs. a "Order(s)" Class (Table)). The O.P. was likely not using the actual name he'd use if it were in the same Scope as his "'normal'" "Person(s)" Class (Table) and/or may've simplified it for this post. – Tom Apr 25 '17 at 18:54
1649

Absolutely - you basically want:

var results = from p in persons
              group p.car by p.PersonId into g
              select new { PersonId = g.Key, Cars = g.ToList() };

Or as a non-query expression:

var results = persons.GroupBy(
    p => p.PersonId, 
    p => p.car,
    (key, g) => new { PersonId = key, Cars = g.ToList() });

Basically the contents of the group (when view as an IEnumerable<T>) is a sequence of whatever values were in the projection (p.car in this case) present for the given key.

For more on how GroupBy works, see my Edulinq post on the topic.

(I've renamed PersonID to PersonId in the above, to follow .NET naming conventions.)

Alternatively, you could use a Lookup:

var carsByPersonId = persons.ToLookup(p => p.PersonId, p => p.car);

You can then get the cars for each person very easily:

// This will be an empty sequence for any personId not in the lookup
var carsForPerson = carsByPersonId[personId];
  • 9
    @jon Skeet what if i want to add another property like name – user123456 Sep 21 '14 at 10:50
  • 21
    @Mohammad: Then you include that in the anonymous type. – Jon Skeet Sep 21 '14 at 11:36
  • 7
    @user123456 here's a good explanation of group by, it also includes an example of grouping by a composite key: How to: Group Query Results (C# Programming Guide) – Mathieu Diepman Jan 31 '15 at 8:51
  • 14
    @Mohammad you can do something like .GroupBy(p => new {p.Id, p.Name}, p => p, (key, g) => new { PersonId = key.Id, PersonName = key.Name, PersonCount = g.Count()}) and you will get all the people that occur with an Id, Name, and a number of occurrences for each person. – Chris Aug 6 '15 at 21:40
  • 10
    @kame: I was deliberately following .NET naming conventions, fixing the OP's names, basically. Will make that clear in the answer. – Jon Skeet Nov 2 '15 at 9:51
49
var results = from p in persons
              group p by p.PersonID into g
              select new { PersonID = g.Key,
                           /**/car = g.Select(g=>g.car).FirstOrDefault()/**/}
35
var results = from p in persons
              group p by p.PersonID into g
              select new { PersonID = g.Key, Cars = g.Select(m => m.car) };
30

You can also Try this.

var results= persons.GroupBy(n => new { n.PersonId, n.car})
                .Select(g => new {
                               g.Key.PersonId,
                               g.Key.car)}).ToList();
  • It is wrong returns the same list does not group by – Vikas Gupta Aug 23 at 7:43
  • It's work,i think something is missing that's why it's doesn't work in your code. – shuvo sarker Aug 26 at 18:18
26

try

persons.GroupBy(x => x.PersonId).Select(x => x)

or

to check if any person is repeating in your list try

persons.GroupBy(x => x.PersonId).Where(x => x.Count() > 1).Any(x => x)
13

I have created a working code sample with Query Syntax and Method Syntax. I hope it helps the others :)

You can also run the code on .Net Fiddle here:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class Person
{ 
    public int PersonId; 
    public string car  ; 
}

class Result
{ 
   public int PersonId;
   public List<string> Cars; 
}

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        List<Person> persons = new List<Person>()
        {
            new Person { PersonId = 1, car = "Ferrari" },
            new Person { PersonId = 1, car = "BMW" },
            new Person { PersonId = 2, car = "Audi"}
        };

        //With Query Syntax

        List<Result> results1 = (
            from p in persons
            group p by p.PersonId into g
            select new Result()
                {
                    PersonId = g.Key, 
                    Cars = g.Select(c => c.car).ToList()
                }
            ).ToList();

        foreach (Result item in results1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item.PersonId);
            foreach(string car in item.Cars)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(car);
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine("-----------");

        //Method Syntax

        List<Result> results2 = persons
            .GroupBy(p => p.PersonId, 
                     (k, c) => new Result()
                             {
                                 PersonId = k,
                                 Cars = c.Select(cs => cs.car).ToList()
                             }
                    ).ToList();

        foreach (Result item in results2)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item.PersonId);
            foreach(string car in item.Cars)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(car);
            }
        }
    }
}

Here is the result:

1
Ferrari
BMW
2
Audi
-----------
1
Ferrari
BMW
2
Audi

2

Try this :

var results= persons.GroupBy(n => n.PersonId)
            .Select(g => new {
                           PersonId=g.Key,
                           Cars=g.Select(p=>p.car).ToList())}).ToList();

But performance-wise the following practice is better and more optimized in memory usage (when our array contains much more items like millions):

var carDic=new Dictionary<int,List<string>>();
for(int i=0;i<persons.length;i++)
{
   var person=persons[i];
   if(carDic.ContainsKey(person.PersonId))
   {
        carDic[person.PersonId].Add(person.car);
   }
   else
   {
        carDic[person.PersonId]=new List<string>(){person.car};
   }
}
//returns the list of cars for PersonId 1
var carList=carDic[1];
  • 4
    g.Key.PersonId? g.SelectMany?? You clearly didn't try this. – Gert Arnold May 26 '16 at 7:10
  • you're write I edited some codes codes in it and didn't test it. My main point was the second part. But anyway thanks for your consideration. It was too late to edit that code when I realized it's wrong. so g.Key replaces g.Key.PersonId, and Select rather than SelectMany ! so messy sorry :))) – akazemis May 26 '16 at 7:18
  • 2
    @akazemis: I was actually trying to create (to use terms equivalent to OP's domain) SortedDictionary <PersonIdInt, SortedDictionary <CarNameString, CarInfoClass>>. The closest I could get using LINQ was IEnumerable <IGrouping <PersonIdInt, Dictionary <CarNameString, PersonIdCarNameXrefClass>>>. I ended using your for loop method which, btw, was 2x faster. Also, I would use: a) foreach vs. for and b) TryGetValue vs. ContainsKey (both for DRY principle - in code & runtime). – Tom Apr 25 '17 at 23:23
1

An alternative way to do this could be select distinct PersonId and group join with persons:

var result = 
    from id in persons.Select(x => x.PersonId).Distinct()
    join p2 in persons on id equals p2.PersonId into gr // apply group join here
    select new 
    {
        PersonId = id,
        Cars = gr.Select(x => x.Car).ToList(),
    };

Or the same with fluent API syntax:

var result = persons.Select(x => x.PersonId).Distinct()
    .GroupJoin(persons, id => id, p => p.PersonId, (id, gr) => new
    {
        PersonId = id,
        Cars = gr.Select(x => x.Car).ToList(),
    });

GroupJoin produces a list of entries in the first list ( list of PersonId in our case), each with a group of joined entries in the second list (list of persons).

-1
var results = persons.GroupBy(n => n.PersonId).Select(r => new Result {PersonID = r.Key, Cars = r.ToList() }).ToList()

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