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My applications in C++Builder use a VCL TTreeview with nodes of several derived TTreeNode classes. After changing the Windows Theme, the treeview somehow gets recreated, not just repainted. During the recreation the derived treenode destructors get called, but their constructors are not called. It appears the new nodes are all of the basic TTreeNode type instead of the derived types. As a result all methods and properties of the derived classes are lost in the process.

In addition, in the recreation the nodes obtain new addresses in TreeView->Items (TTreeNodes), which will become a problem if the theme change occurs during a long-time action upon a certain node ending with the creation of a child node, i.e. the child has to be added to a parent address that does not exist anymore.

Is there a way to prevent a theme change to have an effect on the TTreeView and its nodes? Or any other solution?

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During the recreation the derived treenode destructors get called, but their constructors are not called. It appears the new nodes are all of the basic TTreeNode type instead of the derived types.

Correct. During HWND recreation, before its HWND is destroyed, TTreeView saves its node data to a temporary memory stream and destroys its node objects, and then after a new HWND becomes available, it creates new node objects and restores the saved node data into them. But, when saving and restoring that data, it has no concept of your derived classes, and so it can't persist them correctly.

If all of your nodes are the same derived type, then you should be OK by simply using the TTreeView.OnCreateNodeClass event or overriding the virtual TTreeView.CreateNode() method. But, if your nodes are using multiple derived types, then you are just SOL, sorry. There is simply no way for the native functionality to know which derived type to recreate for which node.

In addition, in the recreation the nodes obtain new addresses in TreeView->Items (TTreeNodes)

Yes, because they are new objects.

which will become a problem if the theme change occurs during a long-time action upon a certain node ending with the creation of a child node, i.e. the child has to be added to a parent address that does not exist anymore.

What are you doing that takes so long that it spans across a window recreation at all? Don't save TTreeNode references to begin with, and you won't have this problem. If you need to track custom data, use the TTreeNode.Data property instead, that is correctly persisted during window recreation.

Is there a way to prevent a theme change to have an effect on the TTreeView, and its nodes?

Not that I'm aware of, no.

Or any other solution?

Handle the window recreation yourself. Set the TTreeView.CreateWndRestores property to false, and then override the virtual DestroyWnd() method to save the node data however you want when the ControlState property has the csRecreating flag, and override the virtual CreateWnd() method to restore that data as needed. For instance, you could save each node's class name, and then use that to create your derived node objects again.

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  • Thanks, Remy. My applications are doing statistical analyses that may sometimes take up hours of computation time. The treeview is used for navigating through the various stages of an analysis. For instance, the root node may represent a dataset with thousands of genetic observations on hundreds of individuals, after one type of analysis a child node may be created representing how observations correspond to chromosomes, grand-child nodes will represent chromosomes, etcetera. Aug 13 at 13:35
  • A client using my English language software on a Japanese Windows PC complained about runtime errors after using a Windows lock-screen and also after changing a Windows theme. While I cannot reproduce the errors after a lock-screen, the errors with theme changes are reproducible. I assume the Japanese lock-screen will be caused by the same TTreeView recreation. By the way, the TTreeView recreation appears to occur when switching between the default Windows theme and another theme; switching between two non-default themes does not force a TTreeView recreation. I don't understand the difference. Aug 13 at 13:51
  • Given the long computations, I think lock-screens are inevitable. Destroying a node while it's method is in a long computation is a bad idea. So I am looking for entirely preventing the recreation of a TTreeView, or actually its TreeNode objects (multiple derived classes in a single tree; OOP polymorphism!). Currently I am trying to catch the WM_THEMECHANGED notification in order to prevent the recreation, but it does not show up in the handler I assigned to WindowProc of the derived TTreeView class. Assistance here is greatly appreciated! Aug 13 at 14:05
  • WM_THEMECHANGED is going to be sent to the Form's window, and likely trigger window recreations along the entire parent/child hierarchy, including the TreeView's parent. A child window can't exist without a parent window. Also, even if you intercepted/blocked the message in your app, the mere act of the OS sending the MESSAGE means open HTHEME handles were invalidated, apps have to close and reopen the current theme. So that could cause other visual side effects if you interfere with the message. Aug 13 at 17:31
  • Since TTreeView doesn't allow you to relink a TTreeNode to a new HTREEITEM ID, but does allow you to stop the default persistence of node data during window recreation, I think your best bet is to do what I said earlier. Either intercept the recreation and persist your own custom data so you can recreate the derived nodes, or else track your custom data outside of the TreeView and just use it for a display of your data, don't store the data inside the TreeView itself (ie, create your own tree in memory, and link its nodes to the TreeView nodes only for display purposes). Aug 13 at 17:35
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I certainly want to prevent the nodes from being recreated. So I derived a TTreeView class overriding CreateWnd() and DestroyWnd() (and a helper boolean variable recreating):

void __fastcall TreeView_c::CreateWnd(void)
  {
  if (recreating)  recreating= false;
  else TreeView::CreateWnd();
  }

void __fastcall TreeView_c::DestroyWnd(void)
  {
  if (CreateWndRestores  &&
      Items->Count > 0   &&
      ControlState.Contains(csRecreating))
       recreating= true;
  else TTreeView::DestroyWnd();
  }

This seems to work, there are no more runtime errors after a Windows theme change. But it just seems too simple to be correct, am I not testing enough themes?

A strange thing is that a theme change does get into DestroyWnd(), setting recreating to true, but does not get into CreateWnd(). I don't understand why not?

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