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I want to know that how the next() method exactly works in python?

lst=[1,2,3,4]
it=iter(lst)
print(next(it))
print(next(it))
print(next(it))
print(next(it))

Output
1
2
3
4

My Questions:

  1. When we call next() method on iterator, does the next() method returns the value returned by the iterator. If yes, how iterator gets the value from iterable?
  2. When we call next() method on iterator,does the next() methods fetch and returns the value directly from the iterable(without the involvement of iterator)?
  3. Does next() method keeps track of values (like which value to return at which call) or iterator keeps track of values, if iterator keeps track of values, how iterator do it? I mean how iterator keeps track of values?

Please clear my confusions.

1

1 Answer 1

0

All iterables define a function called __iter__. Here I have made a class called Foo which keeps counting up from 1.

class Foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.count = 1
    def __iter__(self):
        while True:
            yield self.count
            self.count += 1

bar = Foo()

When I do it = iter(bar), it checks if bar has an __iter__ function.

Then when I do next(it) it calls the __iter__ function and runs until it hits a yield. Then, it returns that value and pauses.

When you call next(it) again, it goes back to where it was in __iter__ and runs until it hits a yield again. If it exits the __iter__ function, it raises a StopIteration error.

4
  • I want to know the next() method and iterator relationship.. Aug 12 at 11:16
  • 1
    @user19626400 they told you what the relation is, as does my duplicate. Are you actually asking what the iter does for lists?
    – luk2302
    Aug 12 at 11:20
  • @luk2302 I want to know the behind the scenes working of next() method along with an iterator on which we call next() method. Aug 12 at 11:22
  • 1
    @user19626400 then what is unclear about "Then when I do next(it) it calls the __iter__ function and runs until it hits a yield. Then, it returns that value and pauses."?
    – luk2302
    Aug 12 at 12:21

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