252

This question already has an answer here:

I need to add leading zeros to integer to make a string with defined quantity of digits ($cnt). What the best way to translate this simple function from PHP to Python:

function add_nulls($int, $cnt=2) {
    $int = intval($int);
    for($i=0; $i<($cnt-strlen($int)); $i++)
        $nulls .= '0';
    return $nulls.$int;
}

Is there a function that can do this?

marked as duplicate by fedorqui, Foon, Malte Schwerhoff, Piran, jmarkmurphy Apr 5 '17 at 12:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

11 Answers 11

523

You can use the zfill() method to pad a string with zeros:

In [3]: str(1).zfill(2)
Out[3]: '01'
  • 1
    Is there a way to do the same only return an actual integer like 004 not a string like '004'? – Ajay Jul 29 '14 at 20:10
  • 37
    @Ajay 004 isn't an actual integer – Alvaro Jan 29 '15 at 18:37
  • 15
    The way 004 is parsed by the compiler, and then represented in memory, is exactly the same as 4. The only time a difference is visible is in the .py source code. If you need to store information like "format this number with leading zeros until the hundreds place", integers alone cannot provide that - you need to use alternate data structures (string work well in this case) – Gershom Maes Nov 11 '15 at 16:20
  • 19
    Need to say that this is not correct. The fact that 004 == 4 is kinda fortune. The way interpreter (python is not compiled) parses ints is different for ints starting with a leading 0. If a number starts with 0 then it is considered as 8-nary number. So yeah, 004 == 4, but 040 != 40 because 040 = 4 * 8 + 0 = 32. – sbeliakov Jan 9 '17 at 15:01
  • 8
    To clarify a couple of things: 1. That is true only for parsing of integer literals, not for conversion of strings to ints - eg. if you do a = 010 then the value of a will be 8 but if you do a = int("010") the value of a will be 10. 2. Only Python 2 behaves this way - in python 3, a = 010 would give a syntax error. Octals in python 3 start with 0o, eg. 0o10 (presumably to avoid this exact confusion). – Tom Mar 31 '17 at 8:58
148

The standard way is to use format string modifiers. These format string methods are available in most programming languages (via the sprintf function in c for example) and are a handy tool to know about.

i = random.randint(0,99999)
print "%05d" % i

which will output an string of length 5.


Edit: In Python2.6 and above, there is also:

print '{0:05d}'.format(i)

See: https://docs.python.org/2/library/string.html

  • 11
    % is deprecated in favor of .format – Alvaro Jan 29 '15 at 18:00
  • So what if you don't know the number of zeros before runtime? Let's say the length of a list? – Zelphir Aug 16 '15 at 23:26
  • 3
    @Zelphir you can dynamically create the formatting string, [('{{0:0{0:d}d}}').format(len(my_list)).format(k) for k in my_list] – Mark Aug 28 '15 at 8:31
  • I've chosen to concat the format string instead, inserting the length of a list for example. Are there any advantages of your way of doing it? – Zelphir Aug 29 '15 at 10:19
  • 2
    There is no need to use str.format() when all the template contains is one {...} placeholder. Avoid parsing the template and use the format() function instead: format(i, '05d') – Martijn Pieters Sep 29 '16 at 19:01
65

You most likely just need to format your integer:

'%0*d' % (fill, your_int)

For example,

>>> '%0*d' % (3, 4)
'004'
  • 1
    The question is - how to add not permanent quantity of zeros – ramusus Apr 9 '09 at 9:20
  • +1 formatting is the way to go – David Z Apr 9 '09 at 9:23
  • 2
    no that's not a question. – SilentGhost Apr 9 '09 at 9:23
  • 2
    This is not permanent - in fact you cannot add zeroes permanently to the from of an int - that would then be interpreted as an octal value. – Matthew Schinckel Apr 9 '09 at 11:56
  • @Matthew Schnickel: I think the OP wants to know a method to compute the number of zeros he needs. Formatting handles that fine. And int(x, 10) handles the leading zeros. – unbeknown Apr 9 '09 at 12:15
34

Python 3.6 f-strings allows us to add leading zeros easily:

number = 5
print(f' now we have leading zeros in {number:02d}')

Have a look at this good post about.

  • 1
    This is the most pythonic, and certainly my favourite of the answers so far. – John Forbes Sep 3 '18 at 6:40
  • 1
    This should now be the accepted answer – Johann Burgess Nov 28 '18 at 3:22
21

Python 2.6 allows this:

add_nulls = lambda number, zero_count : "{0:0{1}d}".format(number, zero_count)

>>>add_nulls(2,3)
'002'
12

For Python 3 and beyond: str.zfill() is still the most readable option

But it is a good idea to look into the new and powerful str.format(), what if you want to pad something that is not 0?

    # if we want to pad 22 with zeros in front, to be 5 digits in length:
    str_output = '{:0>5}'.format(22)
    print(str_output)
    # >>> 00022
    # {:0>5} meaning: ":0" means: pad with 0, ">" means move 22 to right most, "5" means the total length is 5

    # another example for comparision
    str_output = '{:#<4}'.format(11)
    print(str_output)
    # >>> 11##

    # to put it in a less hard-coded format:
    int_inputArg = 22
    int_desiredLength = 5
    str_output = '{str_0:0>{str_1}}'.format(str_0=int_inputArg, str_1=int_desiredLength)
    print(str_output)
    # >>> 00022
5

You have at least two options:

  • str.zfill: lambda n, cnt=2: str(n).zfill(cnt)
  • % formatting: lambda n, cnt=2: "%0*d" % (cnt, n)

If on Python >2.5, see a third option in clorz's answer.

2

One-liner alternative to the built-in zfill.

This function takes x and converts it to a string, and adds zeros in the beginning only and only if the length is too short:

def zfill_alternative(x,len=4): return ( (('0'*len)+str(x))[-l:] if len(str(x))<len else str(x) )

To sum it up - build-in: zfill is good enough, but if someone is curious on how to implement this by hand, here is one more example.

1

A straightforward conversion would be (again with a function):

def add_nulls2(int, cnt):
    nulls = str(int)
    for i in range(cnt - len(str(int))):
        nulls = '0' + nulls
    return nulls
-1

Just for the culture, on PHP, you have the function str_pad which makes exactly the job of your function add_nulls.

str_pad($int, $cnt, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
-2

This is my Python function:

def add_nulls(num, cnt=2):
  cnt = cnt - len(str(num))
  nulls = '0' * cnt
  return '%s%s' % (nulls, num)
  • 1
    Which is what str.zfill does :) – tzot Apr 9 '09 at 11:33
  • yes :) another method is this: '%03d' % 8 – Emre Apr 9 '09 at 12:19

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