15

For example,

public int DoSomething(in SomeType something){
  int local(){
     return something.anInt;
  }
  return local();
}

Why does the compiler issue an error that the something variable cannot be used in the local function?

10
  • 1
    "because the language is designed that way" / "the language has not implemented this feature" would be the basic answer. What are you actually trying to achieve that is blocked by this constraint?
    – Pac0
    Aug 14 at 14:37
  • @Pac0 Something very hard to explain that is way outside the usual parquet of C# devs. I am actually implementing a C# compiler , but it uses pre-verified C# syntax with Roslyn as input, and this particular quirk doesn't fit with my needs. But it does make me wonder what I am missing, as if there is some edge case here then I will probably need to understand it for what I am doing too
    – Frank
    Aug 14 at 14:42
  • @Pac0 If I had to guess, I'd say it has something to do with optimisation...that the local function is not permitted to 'see' something that is left in the originating/declaring scope...
    – Frank
    Aug 14 at 14:44
  • Fair enough for your need of understanding the rationale. I don't see right now a specific theoretical point that would make this impossible (though, maybe there is). Maybe this question will receive an enlightening answer! But keep in mind that in a language, features are unimplemented by default. It's some work to analyze, prioritize, design, etc. to add fancy perks to the language. So it may very well that C#doesn't allow it simply because... it has not been implemented in the language (yet?). See this Eric Lippert answer/disgression here stackoverflow.com/a/8673015/479251
    – Pac0
    Aug 14 at 14:46
  • 1
    making me think that it would be a good question to ask on their github (from roslyn or c#language?). This could become a feature request.
    – Pac0
    Aug 14 at 14:52

1 Answer 1

14

The documentation on local functions states the following

Variable capture

Note that when a local function captures variables in the enclosing scope, the local function is implemented as a delegate type.

And looking at lambdas:

Capture of outer variables and variable scope in lambda expressions

A lambda expression can't directly capture an in, ref, or out parameter from the enclosing method.

The reason is simple: it's not possible to lift these parameters into a class, due to ref escaping problems. And that is what would be necessary to do in order to capture it.

Example

public Func<int> DoSomething(in SomeType something){
  int local(){
     return something.anInt;
  }
  return local;
}

Suppose this function is called like this:

public Func<int> Mystery()
{
    SomeType ghost = new SomeType();
    return DoSomething(ghost);
}

public void Scary()
{
    var later = Mystery();
    Thread.Sleep(5000);
    later(); // oops
}

The Mystery function creates a ghost and passes it as an in parameter to DoSomething, which means that it is passed as a read-only reference to the ghost variable.

The DoSomething function captures this reference into the local function local, and then returns that function as a Func<int> delegate.

When the Mystery function returns, the ghost variable no longer exists. The Scary function then uses the delegate to call the local function, and local will try to read the anInt property from a nonexistent variable. Oops.

The "You may not capture reference parameters (in, out, ref) in delegates" rule prevents this problem.

You can work around this problem by making a copy of the in parameter and capturing the copy:

public Func<int> DoSomething2(in SomeType something){
  var copy = something;
  int local(){
     return copy.anInt;
  }
  return local;
}

Note that the returned delegate operates on the copy, not on the original ghost. It means that the delegate will always have a valid copy to get anInt from. However, it means that any future changes to ghost will have no effect on the copy.

public int Mystery()
{
    SomeType ghost = new SomeType() { anInt = 42 };
    var later = DoSomething2(ghost);
    ghost = new SomeType() { anInt = -1 };
    return later(); // returns 42, not -1
}
20
  • 2
    This seems like a good start to explaining the issue, but "ref escaping problems" is a bit hand-wavy for my taste. What exactly is the connection between delegates and lambdas here? Is the restriction on lambdas itself arbitrary, or what underlies that technically? Aug 14 at 15:41
  • 1
    @KarlKnechtel A lambda which captures variables gets converted into a class, where the fields contain the captured variables. ref escaping is well documented: you cannot have a ref field in a class, it's only allowed as a local variable. The first quote I gave shows that local functions become lambdas if there are captured variables Aug 14 at 16:27
  • 3
    Delaying enforcement until return local; means that the compiler must do escape analysis: "Is it possible for local to be called after this function returns?" Escape analysis is hard. For example, would list.Mystery(e => e.value == local()) be safe? You don't know, because you don't know what Mystery does. You would have to create more and more complex rules to allow this if Mystery is Select or Where, but not other methods, and when you're done it's not clear that you made things any better. Simple rules are simple to explain and to understand. Aug 14 at 16:30
  • 1
    Note also that "lazy compiler implementation" is thinking about the problem at the wrong level. This is not an implementation question. This is a language question. What you definitely don't want is "Some compilers accept this code, but others reject it." Or "This code compiles only if you set optimization level to 2 or higher (when escape analysis kicks in), but other level 2 optimizations make our problem nearly impossible to debug." The rules for what constitutes a syntactically legal program need to be independent of implementation. Aug 14 at 16:36
  • 1
    However Implementation as a delegate (just before the "Variable capture" you are linking to) states "Local functions are more flexible in that they can be written like a traditional method or as a delegate. Local functions are only converted to delegates when used as a delegate.". So I don't think the delegate variable capturing rules really explain the limitation in question. Also, even for delegates, one can understand ref and out behavior...
    – Ivan Stoev
    Aug 15 at 8:45

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