15

I have the following code:

var foo = (from data in pivotedData.AsEnumerable()
                   select new
                   {
                     Group = data.Field<string>("Group_Number"),
                     Study = data.Field<string>("Study_Name")
                   }).Distinct();

As expected this returns distinct values. However, what I want is to return a strongly-typed collection as opposed to an anonymous type, so when I do:

var foo = (from data in pivotedData.AsEnumerable()
                   select new BarObject
                   {
                     Group = data.Field<string>("Group_Number"),
                     Study = data.Field<string>("Study_Name")
                   }).Distinct();

This does not return the distinct values, it returns them all. Is there a way to do this with actual objects?

4
  • 9
    Implement Equals() and GetHashCode() on your type.
    – dlev
    Sep 7 '11 at 15:16
  • @dlev what GetHashCode should do?
    – BrunoLM
    Sep 7 '11 at 15:20
  • @BrunoLM: Read for example this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/6305324/… GetHashCode should deliver a hashcode over all fields that Equals also compares, and is used for hashtables or dictionaries for quick lookup of objects. Sep 7 '11 at 15:24
  • @Bruno Distinct will attempt to put each object into a hash table (and will return only those that do not already exist.) That means that hash code must be implemented properly to ensure that equal items have the same hash. Otherwise, Equals() (probably) won't be called, since the objects might hash to different buckets.
    – dlev
    Sep 7 '11 at 15:25
12

For Distinct() (and many other LINQ features) to work, the class being compared (BarObject in your example) must implement implement Equals() and GetHashCode(), or alternatively provide a separate IEqualityComparer<T> as an argument to Distinct().

Many LINQ methods take advantage of GetHashCode() for performance because internally they will use things like a Set<T> to hold the unique items, which uses hashing for O(1) lookups. Also, GetHashCode() can quickly tell you if two objects may be equivalent and which ones are definitely not - as long as GetHashCode() is properly implemented of course.

So you should make all your classes you intend to compare in LINQ implement Equals() and GetHashCode() for completeness, or create a separate IEqualityComparer<T> implementation.

4
  • Thanks, this is what I have done. I take it that GetHashCode is more important if I am storing the objects in, for example, a dictionary? Sep 7 '11 at 15:41
  • @Darren: GetHashCode() is a very quick way of seeing if two objects MAY be equivalent. This is because any two equivalent objects should always have the same hash code. There's many LINQ methods that take advantage of the hash code for processing and internally use sets or dictionaries. Thus, when using LINQ, both are important. Sep 7 '11 at 15:44
  • 1
    @Darren: Just decompiled Distinct() and it indeed does use a Set<TSource> internally which utilizes hashing. Sep 7 '11 at 15:46
  • 1
    @Darren: Look at the blog post, Gage has mentioned: blog.jordanterrell.com/post/…. Distinct requires GetHashCode to function correctly. Sep 7 '11 at 15:46
4

Either do as dlev suggested or use:

var foo = (from data in pivotedData.AsEnumerable()
               select new BarObject
               {
                 Group = data.Field<string>("Group_Number"),
                 Study = data.Field<string>("Study_Name")
               }).GroupBy(x=>x.Group).Select(x=>x.FirstOrDefault())

Check this out for more info http://blog.jordanterrell.com/post/LINQ-Distinct()-does-not-work-as-expected.aspx

1
  • Thats (in my opinion) not a very nice solution, as Distinct is much faster and is just designed to do what the op wants. The blog post, however, was interesting. Looks like I was right in assuming Distinct uses a HashSet<> internally. Sep 7 '11 at 15:43
4

You need to override Equals and GetHashCode for BarObject because the EqualityComparer.Default<BarObject> is reference equality unless you have provided overrides of Equals and GetHashCode (this is what Enumerable.Distinct<BarObject>(this IEnumerable<BarObject> source) uses). Alternatively, you can pass in an IEqualityComparer<BarObject> to Enumerable.Distinct<BarObject>(this IEnumerable<BarObject>, IEqualityComparer<BarObject>).

3

Looks like Distinct can not compare your BarObject objects. Therefore it compares their references, which of course are all different from each other, even if they have the same contents.

So either you overwrite the Equals method, or you supply a custom EqualityComparer to Distinct. Remember to overwrite GetHashCode when you implement Equals, otherwise it will produce strange results if you put your objects for example into a dictionary or hashtable as key (e.g. HashSet<BarObject>). It might be (don't know exactly) that Distinct internally uses a hashset.

Here is a collection of good practices for GetHashCode.

2

You want to use the other overload for Distinct() that takes a comparer. You can then implement your own IEqualityComparer<BarObject>.

1

Try this:

var foo = (from data in pivotedData.AsEnumerable().Distinct()
                   select new BarObject
                   {
                     Group = data.Field<string>("Group_Number"),
                     Study = data.Field<string>("Study_Name")
                   });
2
  • That may be possible, but it has not the same semantics. If there are other fields besides 'Group' and 'Study' some duplicates might get left over. Sep 7 '11 at 15:44
  • Yes, there are other fields. I ommitted them for brevity. I did try this approach initially. Thanks anyway. Sep 7 '11 at 15:46
-1

Should be as simple as:

var foo = (from data in pivotedData.AsEnumerable()
               select new
               {
                 Group = data.Field<string>("Group_Number"),
                 Study = data.Field<string>("Study_Name")
               }).Distinct().Select(x => new BarObject {
                 Group = x.Group,
                 Study = x.Study
               });

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.