15

Here is the MWE:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <queue>
using namespace std;

bool operator<(tuple<int, int, int> lhs, tuple<int, int, int> rhs)
{
    return get<1>(lhs) < get<1>(rhs);
}

int main()
{
    priority_queue<tuple<int, int, int>> q;
    q.push(make_tuple(2, 5, 3));
    q.push(make_tuple(2, 3, 3));
    cout << get<1>(q.top());
    return 0;
}

The weird part is that whether I type < or > in the sentence return get<1>(lhs) < get<1>(rhs);, the output is always 5. Why does this happen?

4
  • 6
    My best guess: it's using the default comparison operator for generic tuples. Probably because your operator is not in the std namespace. Try implementing a custom comparator that explicitly calls your operator.
    – Wutz
    Aug 16 at 7:03
  • 3
  • 7
    @JasonLiam it's not a dupe of that
    – Wutz
    Aug 16 at 7:08
  • 7
    You should probably not use std::tuple for things like this, since it comes with it's own comparison operator overloads. You should probably define your own struct with three ints... That way you can also give your members proper names. But if you really want this, you can specify the compare function for the priority_queue, e.g. auto cmp = [](tuple<int, int, int> lhs, tuple<int, int, int> rhs) { return get<1>(lhs) < get<1>(rhs); }; and priority_queue<tuple<int, int, int>,std::vector<tuple<int, int, int>>, decltype(cmp)> q;
    – JHBonarius
    Aug 16 at 7:24

2 Answers 2

23

Your overload of operator< is not selected because it's in a different namespace than both std::priority_queue and std::tuple. It's not in the candidate set, so it is never even considered as an overload candidate.

The search for a suitable overload happens in the namespace where the operator is called from, which is the namespace priority_queue lives in, i.e. std. Argument-dependent lookup causes an additional search in the namespaces of the arguments, but because tuple is also in the std namespace, that doesn't help either. There is no reason for the compiler to ever consider the global namespace at all.

Instead, the standard library's definition of std::operator< for tuples is used. You can see that if you put your own implementation in a namespace std block:

// !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
// BAD SOLUTION, DO NOT USE
// !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

namespace std {
bool operator<(tuple<int, int, int> lhs, tuple<int, int, int> rhs)
{
    return get<1>(lhs) > get<1>(rhs); // Changed to > so we can see the difference.
}
}

Now the output is 3. Your operator is now considered and takes precedence over the default one, because non-template functions come before template functions.

But it is forbidden by the standard to put your own code into namespace std (with some small exceptions), so what to do? The solution is to pass a comparator functor explicitly:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <queue>
using namespace std;

struct element_1_greater {
    bool operator()(tuple<int, int, int> lhs, tuple<int, int, int> rhs)
    {
        return get<1>(lhs) > get<1>(rhs);
    }
};

int main()
{
    priority_queue<tuple<int, int, int>, vector<tuple<int, int, int>>, element_1_greater> q;
    q.push(make_tuple(2,5,3));
    q.push(make_tuple(2,3,3));
    cout << get<1>(q.top()) << '\n';
    return 0;
}

Notice that we need to pass the second argument to priority_queue as well; you can shorten this with a typedef or using declaration of course.

1
  • Yeah, I showed the custom comparator template argument in the comments. I put it there, because it's not an actual answer to the question. And "best solution" is debatable. In my experience it's often "better" to replace the tuple by a custom class, if only to have proper names for the members.
    – JHBonarius
    Aug 16 at 7:35
2

std::tuple is in the namespace std, the compiler looks for an overloaded operator< (3) in the namespace std until C++20 and operator<=> (7) also in the namespace std since C++20. The one of the global namespace is not considered while searching due to the argument dependent name lookup rules.

The fix:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <queue>
using namespace std;

bool operator<(tuple<int, int, int> lhs, tuple<int, int, int> rhs)
{
    return get<1>(lhs) > get<1>(rhs);
}

int main()
{
    using T = tuple<int, int, int>;
    priority_queue<T, vector<T>, bool(*)(T, T)> q(::operator<);
    q.push(make_tuple(2,5,3));
    q.push(make_tuple(2,3,3));
    cout << get<1>(q.top());
    return 0;
}
// Outputs: 3
5
  • This answer would be better if it explained why it's a closer match, with reference to the C++ overloading rules. In particular, non-template functions typically take precedence over template functions like the std implementation of operator<, so why isn't that happening here?
    – Thomas
    Aug 16 at 7:11
  • Not a closer match, just OP's overload is even not in overload set with ADL.
    – Jarod42
    Aug 16 at 7:14
  • @Jarod42 Why not? Why wouldn't ADL apply here?
    – Thomas
    Aug 16 at 7:15
  • 1
    @Thomas: ADL applies, priority_queue ans tuple bring namespace std, int brings no namespaces (and not the global namespace); So only std::operator< are found.
    – Jarod42
    Aug 16 at 7:18
  • @Jarod42 does adl take precedence? Because since the custom operator is defined in the global namespace I would have expected it to be found/considered as well.
    – Wutz
    Aug 16 at 7:23

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